Kinyonga
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I'm a bit confused by these sentences in my AQA A-level biology course:

The area of the graph [showing how the rate of PS increases compared to the light intensity] that curves is known as the light compensation point. This is the point at which the amount of CO2 used in photosynthesis is equal to the amount of CO2 produced in respiration.

Could someone explain this, please? Thanks!
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Kinyonga
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Reality Check
I request your supreme knowledge to aid me in this...
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Jasmine528
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Hi,
What specifically are you confused about? As I understand it but I'm struggling to find a way to reword it.
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Kinyonga
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(Original post by Jasmine528)
Hi,
What specifically are you confused about? As I understand it but I'm struggling to find a way to reword it.
It's this bit mainly: This is the point at which the amount of CO2 used in photosynthesis is equal to the amount of CO2 produced in respiration.
The amount of CO2 where? Produced by what, when?
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Jasmine528
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The amount of CO2 produced by the plant in respiration is equal to the amount of CO2 being used by the plant in photosynthesis.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Kinyonga)
It's this bit mainly: This is the point at which the amount of CO2 used in photosynthesis is equal to the amount of CO2 produced in respiration.
The amount of CO2 where? Produced by what, when?
I am duly summoned

As you know, cellular respiration produces CO2 in animals - plants are no different. When the amount of CO2 being used in photosynthesis equals the amount being produced by the plant's respiration, this is called the light compensation point.

At this point, the net CO2 assimilation is zero. You can see from this that the compensation point is likely to occur at two points in the day...
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Vinny C
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I am duly summoned

As you know, cellular respiration produces CO2 in animals - plants are no different. When the amount of CO2 being used in photosynthesis equals the amount being produced by the plant's respiration, this is called the light compensation point.

At this point, the net CO2 assimilation is zero. You can see from this that the compensation point is likely to occur at two points in the day...
Interesting, thanks.
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Kinyonga
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I am duly summoned

As you know, cellular respiration produces CO2 in animals - plants are no different. When the amount of CO2 being used in photosynthesis equals the amount being produced by the plant's respiration, this is called the light compensation point.

At this point, the net CO2 assimilation is zero. You can see from this that the compensation point is likely to occur at two points in the day...
Oh I see! I guess I was just looking too far for an explanation, as usual haha. Thanks
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Vinny C
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(Original post by Kinyonga)
Oh I see! I guess I was just looking too far for an explanation, as usual haha. Thanks
Not at all... I have learned from this. So... the net effect of the plant should be to absorb CO2 and release oxygen!
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