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    This is a really good idea

    Will do one at some point, when I have a spare three seconds...
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    Omg, I'm so glad I didn't do PPE - THREE essays a week?? :O
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    You're glad you didn't go to Oxford...the workload is inhumane!
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    and I thought Jap-Pol at SOAS was bad...
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    Sooo ... I'm bumping this because I have nothing else to do :ninja: is anyone ever doing a Week in the Life for SOAS any time soon?

    :ninja:
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    Okayyyy I'll put mine on seeing as it's the kind of thing I would like to have known this time last year....
    I'm a first year doing BA Japanese and Korean. People who do this: You won't learn Korean language until year two but considering the Japanese side, this is actually a good thing. It's pretty intense.
    Every week I have ten hours of Japanese language. And five hours of lectures (Japanese history and Korean history.) I'm in elementary Japanese (EJ) class which is basically for people who when they started out, didn't know much Japanese. There is an advanced class (AJ) who are people who did GCSE (and remember it still), A Level, spent significant time in Japan etc. If you're really pro you can get into second year straight away. :P No one cares which group you're in so don't go thinking "oh I'm gonna be in AJ cuz I'm really clever" - tbh AJ seems a bit of a disadvantage because you'll have less class time but cover the same amount of work. (but seeing as you already know some Japanese you will cope. My friends from AJ tell me the teachers said that EJ people will be better at the end because AJ students get complacent.. we'll see.)

    Anyway..
    Monday: 11-12 - Weekly "quiz." (Yes, that's right. There is a test every week and although it's not major, it gives you something to work for so don't worry.)
    12-1 - Grammar (Cover one chapter from the textbook.)
    2-3 - Reading class (Basically.. reading a story of some kind and answering questions.)

    Tuesday: 9-11 - Grammar (Review chapter from Monday and cover another. You mostly do two chapters a week from minna no nihongo. Occasionally three. )
    12-1 - Practical class (Speaking class. You practice conversations from the book. A lot of people hate this class. This one is a different teacher from the Friday one. More often you do things from a sheet or "roleplays" e.g. in a shop in this lesson.)

    Wednesday: 10-11 Kanji class (This comprises going over the 20 (25 after 2 months or so) kanji for that week, new katakana words/spelling/intonation and new readings of words which have a lot.)
    11-12 - Writing class (hm. Learning how to write? It's like specific details e.g. Arabic or kanji numerals, paragraph spaces (lol) and differences between similar words. Every week we have to do a piece of writing e.g. a postcard.)

    Thursday: The Japanese department has this day off so if you're single honours, lucky you.
    3-5 Korean history to the 20th C. (This covers from palaeolithic (stone age) up to the first half of 20th C I think. Mostly it's about the middle of that period e.g. 3 kingdoms.)

    Friday: 10-11 Translation class (At the start you'll have a vocabulary/spelling test for the words from the two chapters (30~50 words/ch - not as hard as it sounds) of that week. Then you'll go over the translation homework which you did the night before.)
    12-1 - Practical (see previous.)
    1:15 - 4 Aspects of Japanese Culture (Everyone's favourite. It's pretty interesting as long as it's not about religion - there's a different teacher for that and she's actually a phD student so it's not that great. Anyway, mainly it's Alan Cummings who's not bad. There's a break in the middle and one "lecture" either side.)

    Mostly people have the same classes on the days like my timetable but they might be at a different time. There is another Korean class (modern history) on Tuesday. For dual-honours students, only the Japanese language classes are compulsory. So you don't need to take Aspects (there might be a requirement for your other department, though. I had to take at least one Korean module, although there was only two on offer this year.)

    About homework: Every week you will do: the grammar exercises from minna corresponding to the chapters you covered, the listening exercises from minna for those chapters, the reading homework (e.g. translations, questions), writing homework, kanji homework 1 and 2 (both easy), grammar exercises from the SOAS work book and translation from the SOAS book.
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    (Original post by fourr)
    Okayyyy I'll put mine on seeing as it's the kind of thing I would like to have known this time last year....
    I'm a first year doing BA Japanese and Korean. People who do this: You won't learn Korean language until year two but considering the Japanese side, this is actually a good thing. It's pretty intense.
    Every week I have ten hours of Japanese language. And five hours of lectures (Japanese history and Korean history.) I'm in elementary Japanese (EJ) class which is basically for people who when they started out, didn't know much Japanese. There is an advanced class (AJ) who are people who did GCSE (and remember it still), A Level, spent significant time in Japan etc. If you're really pro you can get into second year straight away. :P No one cares which group you're in so don't go thinking "oh I'm gonna be in AJ cuz I'm really clever" - tbh AJ seems a bit of a disadvantage because you'll have less class time but cover the same amount of work. (but seeing as you already know some Japanese you will cope. My friends from AJ tell me the teachers said that EJ people will be better at the end because AJ students get complacent.. we'll see.)

    Anyway..
    Monday: 11-12 - Weekly "quiz." (Yes, that's right. There is a test every week and although it's not major, it gives you something to work for so don't worry.)
    12-1 - Grammar (Cover one chapter from the textbook.)
    2-3 - Reading class (Basically.. reading a story of some kind and answering questions.)

    Tuesday: 9-11 - Grammar (Review chapter from Monday and cover another. You mostly do two chapters a week from minna no nihongo. Occasionally three. )
    12-1 - Practical class (Speaking class. You practice conversations from the book. A lot of people hate this class. This one is a different teacher from the Friday one. More often you do things from a sheet or "roleplays" e.g. in a shop in this lesson.)

    Wednesday: 10-11 Kanji class (This comprises going over the 20 (25 after 2 months or so) kanji for that week, new katakana words/spelling/intonation and new readings of words which have a lot.)
    11-12 - Writing class (hm. Learning how to write? It's like specific details e.g. Arabic or kanji numerals, paragraph spaces (lol) and differences between similar words. Every week we have to do a piece of writing e.g. a postcard.)

    Thursday: The Japanese department has this day off so if you're single honours, lucky you.
    3-5 Korean history to the 20th C. (This covers from palaeolithic (stone age) up to the first half of 20th C I think. Mostly it's about the middle of that period e.g. 3 kingdoms.)

    Friday: 10-11 Translation class (At the start you'll have a vocabulary/spelling test for the words from the two chapters (30~50 words/ch - not as hard as it sounds) of that week. Then you'll go over the translation homework which you did the night before.)
    12-1 - Practical (see previous.)
    1:15 - 4 Aspects of Japanese Culture (Everyone's favourite. It's pretty interesting as long as it's not about religion - there's a different teacher for that and she's actually a phD student so it's not that great. Anyway, mainly it's Alan Cummings who's not bad. There's a break in the middle and one "lecture" either side.)

    Mostly people have the same classes on the days like my timetable but they might be at a different time. There is another Korean class (modern history) on Tuesday. For dual-honours students, only the Japanese language classes are compulsory. So you don't need to take Aspects (there might be a requirement for your other department, though. I had to take at least one Korean module, although there was only two on offer this year.)

    About homework: Every week you will do: the grammar exercises from minna corresponding to the chapters you covered, the listening exercises from minna for those chapters, the reading homework (e.g. translations, questions), writing homework, kanji homework 1 and 2 (both easy), grammar exercises from the SOAS work book and translation from the SOAS book.
    I love aspects of Japanese Culture. Alan is a king!
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    I'll offer a very different sounding week:

    I do Anthropology, with a floater in Aspects of Japanese Culture

    Monday: 9.30-10.30 Introduction to Social Anthropology

    Very interesting lecture which deals with the methods of anthropological study through the ages and various theories that have come of it.

    Tuesday: 9:30-10.30 Social Theory

    Can't say I'm enamoured with this one. Deals with Marx, Rousseau etc, investigating philosophy

    Wednesday: 9:15-10:15 Voice and Place

    We get a lecture each week focusing on a different region and its people. Varies from amazingly brilliant to slightly dull

    Thursday: 13:00-14:00 Social Theory Tutorial

    We talk and discuss the lecture, asking each person what they thought of it

    Friday: 10:00-11:00 Voice and Place Tutorial

    As above but for Voice and Place

    13:15-16:00 Aspects of Japanese Culture

    Very interesting, covering social structure, literature, international relations etc

    There is one essay for each module for the entire year, and no homework so this is a good choice if the other courses people have posted sound intense.
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    wow. Your course is like half the amount of time we have :b
    I agree about Alan though.
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    (Original post by fourr)
    wow. Your course is like half the amount of time we have :b
    I agree about Alan though.
    Yeah, I'm hardly ever in :laughing:
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    (Original post by croquis)

    Tuesdays / 11am-1pm @ Russell Square

    History and Structure of the Korean Language with Dr Yeon.
    It's within the Korean department, but I use it as my linguistics option. This isn't really the most popular course of SOAS, there are 5?6? people on the course apparantly, but in practice 2 or 3..
    Jae Hoon Yeon is godly! :yep:

    :jiggy:
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    I'm going to do a Yuffie and break up all this Linguistics and Japanese malarky :yep:

    Seriously though, when you do come to SOAS just assume that everyone you meet does Japanese...90% chance that they will, and if they are guys they will be called Matt, Alex or Tom.

    I'm doing BA Economics and Politics, which if you want Economics to com first in your degree title, you have to take Quantitative Methods (or introduction to if you haven't done A-Level Maths) in your first year.

    Monday
    9-11 - Introduction to Quantitative Methods Lecture
    I only took Maths to GCSE level so the first half of the term mostly compromises of going over GCSE maths that is needed for economics, after Reading Week in the first term we started going onto A-Level type maths and it's economic applications. Hard work at 9am on a Monday, not many people turn up, but when it is full there are about 60 of us. This is held in Russell Square so we have to leave Dinwiddy at 8.30am.

    2-3 - Comparative and International Politics Tutorial
    Here we basically go over the readings that were set (which are in the study packs). My tutor is a guy called Gonzo and he can tell very easily if you haven't done the reading, so it's pretty imperative. We get set tutorial questions that we discuss in the hour. There are about 7 people in my class and we individually get grilled on the readings, so I find that I have to make notes when I'm doing the reading for this class. This is over in Vernon Square I think for all the tutorial groups.

    3-4 - Comparative and International Politics Lecture
    In the first term you study international politics which is taught by Steve and then after Christmas you go onto comparative politics, which is apparently taught by another good lecturer. Interesting module that deals with current issues and is essentially International Relations. There are probably about 80 odd people in the lecture and attendence is high because its always interesting. Its at the other end of the corridor from the previous tutorial so I don't have to ruse from one to another.

    Non academic wise I go to the gym between about 11.15-12.15 and have enough time to pop back to Dinwiddy, freshen up and eat some lunch.

    Tuesday
    11-12 - Introduction to Political Study Tutorial
    The tutor for this course is also the lecturer, which is good for the continuity, and she is a better tutor than a lecturer. This course is essentially Political Theory, we look at theories of democracy and essential first term readings include JS Mill's On Liberty and Jean Jacques Rousseau's On the Social Contract. We have reading for this from the study packs as well, but you CAN get away with not doing it, although of course it is highly recommended. This is over in Russell Square, but some tutorial groups are in Vernon Square for this.

    3-5 - Introduction to Economic Analysis Lecture
    If you have done A-Level economics then this module isn't too bad. In the first year you study Micro in the first term and Macro in the second term. This is a huge lecture with 100+ people in it. Our current lecturer is interesting...completely mad but it makes it a bit more interesting. We have a 20 minute break inbetween and the lecturer is always about 15 minutes late so it doesn't run for the full 2 hours. We generally spend time playing consequences and eating ice cream near the back of the room :woo: And then only a short walk home afterwards as this is in Vernon.

    I go to the gym after my Political Study tutorial for an hour. A group of us usually do our Econ Analysis homework together tonight, it helps to do it in a group because the lecturer makes up the questions and they are sometimes a bit odd...so it's nice to share your confusion with others :p:

    Wednesday
    Day off for me, no lectures, but I spend my time doing my reading and at the moment, coursework. If you do have a day off it really is important to spend it wisely. Don't get up too late and work as much as possible. I generally do my washing this day as well as I'm in Dinwiddy all day.

    Good night to go out, lots of student nights are held on Wednesdays...*cough* Cheapskates *cough* Otherwise there are always economics seminars being held on Wednesdays....which I keep on meaning to go to, but...you know...:rolleyes:

    Thursday
    11-12 - Introduction to Quantitative Methods Tutorial
    In the lecture you get given a question set which goes over the information taught in the lecture. You need to complete this before the tutorial as it only consists of going over the set and answering any queries. Useful to go to if you have struggled with the information in the lecture. Usually held in the Brunei Gallery so if you get bored you can stare out the big windows into the courtyard :P

    2-3 - Introduction to Economic Analysis Tutorial
    I've just got back from this :yep: Basically we get given an exercise that we need to complete before the next tutorial, and again we go over it. We've also started to talk about the theory in greater depth. In both economics tutorials you are taught by a PHD student, which in the case of Econ Analysis is annoying as her area of research is neither mirco or macro economics, so she doesn't know her theory that well. This is over in Vernon. There is usually quite a lot of reading for this module, and I recommend you buy the books and do the reading, as it explains the theories in other ways and goes into a lot more detail. Make notes and draw the diagrams!

    I usually go to the gym after my Quant Methods tutorial.

    Friday
    2-3 - Introduction to Political Study Lecture
    This is over at Vernon Square so its a nice day to have a lie in Anyway, this lecture is...ok. Manjeet takes it, and as said previously, she is a better tutor than a lecturer. Normally consists of a Powerpoint presentation and her reading her notes off the paper. She talk pretty fast but she does put up all her presentations and notes online, which is quite handy if you do have to miss the lecture...(or if you just can't follow her...) This is in Vernon Square and last week there were very few people in the lecture, when there should be about 80.

    Weekend
    I tend to go home quite a few weekends as I only live 40-50 minutes away by train, so I head home after my lecture on Friday. During the weekend though I do any necessary politics reading, and intend to (but rarely get around to) doing Econ Analysis reading.
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    (Original post by Gwilym)
    Well, almost. There's one numpty called Gwilym as well, I mean, what kind of a name is that?!
    Also, assume that everyone is homosexual and/or rampant socialist as well ... you're more likely to meet a gay communist studying Japanese than anybody else. Or, so it seems.
    I know...I mean, who does he think he is?

    I think I've yet to meet a straight guy at SOAS....or at least a non metrosexual one.

    :p:
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    (Original post by Leanne Antonia)
    I'm going to do a Yuffie and break up all this Linguistics and Japanese malarky :yep:

    I'm doing BA Economics and Politics, which if you want Economics to com first in your degree title, you have to take Quantitative Methods (or introduction to if you haven't done A-Level Maths) in your first year.
    Thanks Leanne! That was really helpful for the non language orientated applicants :p:

    But question (and this is really confusing me because everyone I ask has a different answer) .. you said if we want Economics to come first in our degree we need to take Quan Methods?

    In the SOAS booklet and the emails I got from the SOAS lecturers about registering for modules, they said that for BAs we can take min of 4 (? I think) and max of 7 modules each or something ... and that whichever subject you have more modules in, is the one that comes first? For example if you took 6 modules in Politics, 5 in Economics (and 1 floater, etc ... because you need 12 units in total right?) then you would have a degree in Politics and Economics?

    Also, some people at SOAS (and some emails I got) have told me that Quantitative Methods or Intro is compulsory ... we HAVE to take it? But I thought that was the case only for BSc Economics and not for BA??

    Sorry for all these questions :p: everyone is confusing me
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    (Original post by eMJaaay♥)
    Thanks Leanne! That was really helpful for the non language orientated applicants :p:

    But question (and this is really confusing me because everyone I ask has a different answer) .. you said if we want Economics to come first in our degree we need to take Quan Methods?

    In the SOAS booklet and the emails I got from the SOAS lecturers about registering for modules, they said that for BAs we can take min of 4 (? I think) and max of 7 modules each or something ... and that whichever subject you have more modules in, is the one that comes first? For example if you took 6 modules in Politics, 5 in Economics (and 1 floater, etc ... because you need 12 units in total right?) then you would have a degree in Politics and Economics?

    Also, some people at SOAS (and some emails I got) have told me that Quantitative Methods or Intro is compulsory ... we HAVE to take it? But I thought that was the case only for BSc Economics and not for BA??

    Sorry for all these questions :p: everyone is confusing me
    I think Quant Methods is now becoming compulsory. It says in the handbook (which can be viewed online if SOAS haven't sent you a copy) that you have to do Econ Analysis and then either Intro to Quant or Quant Methods depends on whether you did maths at A-Level. When I was signing up for modules in the first week I was told I had to do Intro to Quant if I wanted Economics first in my degree title. In the handbook you also have to do Intermediate Econ Analysis in the 2nd year if you want economics first.

    Very confusing stuff. Maybe contact the department by E-Mail, they are actually quite useful
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    Ooooo this is really helpful, cheers folks

    Are there many straight girls at SOAS :p:?

    Also, where abouts to people usually go for nights out etc.? What's the social life/SU/union organised events like? And what nights are the usual going out nights?

    J
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    (Original post by JoeJBB)
    Ooooo this is really helpful, cheers folks

    Are there many straight girls at SOAS :p:?

    Also, where abouts to people usually go for nights out etc.? What's the social life/SU/union organised events like? And what nights are the usual going out nights?

    J
    Lol? Yeah, quite a lot. There is a LBGT and a feminism society (maybe same thing?) but every uni has that, right? I think it's pretty normal, anyway..
    There's the SOAS union which is pretty crap and small tbh. There's ULU which has promotions on Friday nights and then there's all the other UoL uni's unions..
    Um, clubs like Fabric, Heaven/G A Y (lol), MoS, etc. there's lots, seeing as it's London after all. The other night I went to a place called Moonlight (or something) which has a night where the drinks are 80p. Individual societies usually have a decent amount of events.. but if you want a proper social life, you really need to organise it yourself. (Saying that, the Japan society had a night at a club this week.) Anyway, it hasn't been very hard to go out and have fun, it's pretty easy to find out about student nights and then you just get a group together and go. Also, people usually have flat parties which are fun.

    Usual going out nights? Probably depends on your timetable (and weekends) but I have a friend who seems to go out any night he wants.. :b
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    (Original post by fourr)
    Lol? Yeah, quite a lot. There is a LBGT and a feminism society (maybe same thing?) but every uni has that, right? I think it's pretty normal, anyway..
    There's the SOAS union which is pretty crap and small tbh. There's ULU which has promotions on Friday nights and then there's all the other UoL uni's unions..
    Um, clubs like Fabric, Heaven/G A Y (lol), MoS, etc. there's lots, seeing as it's London after all. The other night I went to a place called Moonlight (or something) which has a night where the drinks are 80p. Individual societies usually have a decent amount of events.. but if you want a proper social life, you really need to organise it yourself. (Saying that, the Japan society had a night at a club this week.) Anyway, it hasn't been very hard to go out and have fun, it's pretty easy to find out about student nights and then you just get a group together and go. Also, people usually have flat parties which are fun.

    Usual going out nights? Probably depends on your timetable (and weekends) but I have a friend who seems to go out any night he wants.. :b
    Oooo lovely, thanks . I was just thinkin that with all these people saying there's loads of gay students, as a straight guy it might be a bit hard to pull hehe :p:

    No problem organising a social life myself - I was just a bit worried, because although SOAS sound fantastic (although I haven't visited yet), I've heard that there's no community spirit really, it's really hard to make friends and meet a range of people, no one's really into going out and getting wasted, and lots of the societies are very narrow (eg, if you join a drama society at other unis, you'll meet a huge range of people, but at SOAS the societies seem quite specific, such as 'advocates of a two state solution to the Israel-Palestine conflict', where only people who are really passionate about that issue would join).

    Thanks again (oh, and 'feminist' isn't synonymous with 'lesbian' :p: )

    J
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    (Original post by JoeJBB)
    Thanks again (oh, and 'feminist' isn't synonymous with 'lesbian' :p: )

    I know that. I meant I think they are the same society. As in, the LGBT soc does feminist things.

    I don't think SOAS is really the best choice if you want great societies, but I've met a lot of different people and really like it here..
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    (Original post by fourr)

    I know that. I meant I think they are the same society. As in, the LGBT soc does feminist things.

    I don't think SOAS is really the best choice if you want great societies, but I've met a lot of different people and really like it here..
    Ah right, sorry. Nah societies I'm not particularly bothered about, I was just more worried about the lack of a social life I'de heard about. Thanks

    J
 
 
 
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