How do I get that B/A/A* Grade in Maths

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UltimateWinner
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No matter how much questions i do when i et round to doing maths i always seem to do badly. I dont know how to revise for maths or the best way of doing it. Does anyone have any tips or helpful revision resources that could oush my grade up because my parents (especially my dad) are not really happy about it and they just want me to be able to pass it.
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Infinite Series
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(Original post by UltimateWinner)
No matter how much questions i do when i et round to doing maths i always seem to do badly. I dont know how to revise for maths or the best way of doing it. Does anyone have any tips or helpful revision resources that could oush my grade up because my parents (especially my dad) are not really happy about it and they just want me to be able to pass it.
A-Level or GCSE?
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UltimateWinner
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A Level
(Original post by Infinite Series)
A-Level or GCSE?
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christie.2501
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(Original post by UltimateWinner)
No matter how much questions i do when i et round to doing maths i always seem to do badly. I dont know how to revise for maths or the best way of doing it. Does anyone have any tips or helpful revision resources that could oush my grade up because my parents (especially my dad) are not really happy about it and they just want me to be able to pass it.
hey, when you do the questions do you mark them yourself? do you get them right? if you don't you just need to work on your understanding- ask your teacher for help
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Infinite Series
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I try to finish the content and be thorough with it as fast as I could by reading the textbook examples and watching youtube videos from Jack Brown if i'm still unsure about the topic. I also have a school 'Integral Maths' login which is for the MEI exam board but I love practising from it because the questions are typically more difficult than the AQA ones.

After being thorough with the content, I try to do as many different types of questions for each topic but focus mainly on doing hard questions to prepare myself for worst case scenarios in the real exam. I also write down questions that I struggled with or made silly mistakes on, and I revise that topic again a few days using just the questions sheet. I also skim over this on the exam day, so I can familiarize myself with the hard questions and remember where I make silly mistakes so that I won't mess up and do this in the real exam.

Where I get my Maths practice questions:
• Past and Specimen Papers for all AQA, OCR, Edexcel and MEI.
• My AQA textbook exercises
• Physics&MathsTutor
• Madasmaths.com
• MathsMadeEasy
• Integral Maths
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UltimateWinner
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(Original post by Infinite Series)I try to finish the content and be thorough with it as fast as I could by reading the textbook examples and watching youtube videos from Jack Brown if i'm still unsure about the topic. I also have a school 'Integral Maths' login which is for the MEI exam board but I love practising from it because the questions are typically more difficult than the AQA ones.

After being thorough with the content, I try to do as many different types of questions for each topic but focus mainly on doing hard questions to prepare myself for worst case scenarios in the real exam. I also write down questions that I struggled with or made silly mistakes on, and I revise that topic again a few days using just the questions sheet. I also skim over this on the exam day, so I can familiarize myself with the hard questions and remember where I make silly mistakes so that I won't mess up and do this in the real exam.

Where I get my Maths practice questions:
• Past and Specimen Papers for all AQA, OCR, Edexcel and MEI.
• My AQA textbook exercises
• Physics&MathsTutor
• Madasmaths.com
• MathsMadeEasy
• Integral Maths


THANK YOU SO MUCH. This has helped. What did you do with questions that you really struggle on, because i know OCR have really wordy questions on their MEI integral and it just throws me off. do you have anything to help with that?
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username3731912
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Use exam solutions
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UltimateWinner
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In what way?
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UltimateWinner
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In what way?
(Original post by anonymous1231231)
Use exam solutions
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username3731912
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(Original post by UltimateWinner)
In what way?
It’s a website with all the past exam questions divided by topics
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UltimateWinner
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Okay... What website is it?
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begbie68
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You must reflect honestly on the questions/answers that you complete when practising a topic.

Consider the types of mistake(s) that you make.
There are only 3 different types of mistake in maths:

1. Silly/arithmetic/transposition mistakes.
- assuming that at A-Level, you do actually know how to carry out arithmetic & algebra(!), silly mistakes are easy to avoid by checking your answer.
Checking answer does NOT mean that you look through your working. That is most often a waste of time.
Instead, check whether your answer makes sense. eg is your hypotenuse BIGGER than the other 2 sides.

2. You didn't answer the actual question
- most likely because you failed to read the question properly.
The question wanted eqn of NORMAL, and you used the tangent gradient in your working.
The question required COORDS of a turning point, but you only found x-value

Easy to avoid: once you have arrived at YOUR final answer, re-read the question & make sure YOUR answer is adequate/sufficient.

3. You actually didn't know what the question was demanding.
- That's the type of error that will take longer to conquer.
If this is your 'mistake', then you really don't know the topic well enough. So go back to the text book, and work through (don't just read through) the examples & then complete ALL of the questions in EVERY exercise on that topic.

hth
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UltimateWinner
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Thank you so much. This is treally helpful
(Original post by begbie68)
You must reflect honestly on the questions/answers that you complete when practising a topic.

Consider the types of mistake(s) that you make.
There are only 3 different types of mistake in maths:

1. Silly/arithmetic/transposition mistakes.
- assuming that at A-Level, you do actually know how to carry out arithmetic & algebra(!), silly mistakes are easy to avoid by checking your answer.
Checking answer does NOT mean that you look through your working. That is most often a waste of time.
Instead, check whether your answer makes sense. eg is your hypotenuse BIGGER than the other 2 sides.

2. You didn't answer the actual question
- most likely because you failed to read the question properly.
The question wanted eqn of NORMAL, and you used the tangent gradient in your working.
The question required COORDS of a turning point, but you only found x-value

Easy to avoid: once you have arrived at YOUR final answer, re-read the question & make sure YOUR answer is adequate/sufficient.

3. You actually didn't know what the question was demanding.
- That's the type of error that will take longer to conquer.
If this is your 'mistake', then you really don't know the topic well enough. So go back to the text book, and work through (don't just read through) the examples & then complete ALL of the questions in EVERY exercise on that topic.

hth
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Y12_FurtherMaths
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(Original post by Infinite Series)
I try to finish the content and be thorough with it as fast as I could by reading the textbook examples and watching youtube videos from Jack Brown if i'm still unsure about the topic. I also have a school 'Integral Maths' login which is for the MEI exam board but I love practising from it because the questions are typically more difficult than the AQA ones.

After being thorough with the content, I try to do as many different types of questions for each topic but focus mainly on doing hard questions to prepare myself for worst case scenarios in the real exam. I also write down questions that I struggled with or made silly mistakes on, and I revise that topic again a few days using just the questions sheet. I also skim over this on the exam day, so I can familiarize myself with the hard questions and remember where I make silly mistakes so that I won't mess up and do this in the real exam.

Where I get my Maths practice questions:
• Past and Specimen Papers for all AQA, OCR, Edexcel and MEI.
• My AQA textbook exercises
• Physics&MathsTutor
• Madasmaths.com
• MathsMadeEasy
• Integral Maths
Our school has an integral maths account for the students but we only have access to further maths videos but no actual questions :/
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Infinite Series
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
Our school has an integral maths account for the students but we only have access to further maths videos but no actual questions :/
Well integral isn't necessary to get a top grade, it just helps.The solomon papers on Physics&MathsTutor are almost as good as the integral questions
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