user201678
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
I finished my A-Level exams earlier this year and I got an A* in AQA Sociology A-Level. If anyone wishes to ask me any questions then go ahead
0
reply
hujikolp
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
Can I add u on sc ?
0
reply
user201678
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by hujikolp)
Can I add u on sc ?
Feel free to PM me via TSR any queries you have.
0
reply
hujikolp
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
Okay
0
reply
ForeverYoungx
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
How did you structure your 20 markers and 30 markers?
0
reply
user201678
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by ForeverYoungx)
How did you structure your 20 markers and 30 markers?
Here's what I did....

INTRODUCTION: You need a strong introduction to show the examiner you know what you're talking about. In your introduction you should address what your argument is and what your take on the question is. Introduce what some of the various perspectives would say (maybe about two or three) and make sure you refer to the item and the question.

Then basically you will want to make a point, give an example of that point, you could define any keywords if you wish and then give a sociologist study/name to support your claim. then analyse what that study tells you about the topic and how it supports your argument. then counteract your point with a sociological perspective so e.g. if your point was that marxists believe that the education system reproduces ruling class hegemony then say however, postmodernists would dismiss marxist claims as a metanarrative which merely attempt to impost their views on others and also the fact that postmodernists believe that structures in society are fragmented and have collapsed and so thus the capitalist system no longer exists.

then continue to make several points... i wouldn't say there is a certain number but i would say no less than 5 for a 30 marker and no less than 4 for a 20 marker.

Then conclude making sure you basically assess all your points and say which one ultimately you believe is the strongest.

Make sure you ALWAYS link to the QUESTION and the ITEM.

Make sure your answers have theorists, theory and sociological terminology. Obviously it seems like a lot to fit in but the more timed essays you do and the more you build upon your theoretical knowledge the easier it will become.
2
reply
ForeverYoungx
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by user201678)
Here's what I did....

INTRODUCTION: You need a strong introduction to show the examiner you know what you're talking about. In your introduction you should address what your argument is and what your take on the question is. Introduce what some of the various perspectives would say (maybe about two or three) and make sure you refer to the item and the question.

Then basically you will want to make a point, give an example of that point, you could define any keywords if you wish and then give a sociologist study/name to support your claim. then analyse what that study tells you about the topic and how it supports your argument. then counteract your point with a sociological perspective so e.g. if your point was that marxists believe that the education system reproduces ruling class hegemony then say however, postmodernists would dismiss marxist claims as a metanarrative which merely attempt to impost their views on others and also the fact that postmodernists believe that structures in society are fragmented and have collapsed and so thus the capitalist system no longer exists.

then continue to make several points... i wouldn't say there is a certain number but i would say no less than 5 for a 30 marker and no less than 4 for a 20 marker.

Then conclude making sure you basically assess all your points and say which one ultimately you believe is the strongest.

Make sure you ALWAYS link to the QUESTION and the ITEM.

Make sure your answers have theorists, theory and sociological terminology. Obviously it seems like a lot to fit in but the more timed essays you do and the more you build upon your theoretical knowledge the easier it will become.
Thanks for the response!
1
reply
10yearslate
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by user201678)
AMA
How much longer until the Marxist revolution?
1
reply
TheImpossibleOne
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
Hi! I am really stuck on this question:

Evaluate why sociological researcher might use a non-representative sample.

It is a 16 marker Would really appreciate any help you have!
0
reply
user201678
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by TheImpossibleOne)
Hi! I am really stuck on this question:

Evaluate why sociological researcher might use a non-representative sample.

It is a 16 marker Would really appreciate any help you have!
http://www.sociology.org.uk/notes/So..._methods16.pdf <--- this link essentially covers it all
0
reply
Purplebottle
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
What is sociology about?
0
reply
user201678
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by Purplebottle)
What is sociology about?
It’s about the study of society essentially. We look at various perspectives such as Marxism, Postmodernism, Functionalism, Feminism and see how they explain the society we live in today. It’s a very interesting subject as you can debate over which perspective makes the most convincing argument and which perspective completely misses the point. I would definitely recommend it to anyone doing A-Level because it’s fun and incredibly enjoyable if you like debating from various viewpoints.
1
reply
seokjin's laugh
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by user201678)
I finished my A-Level exams earlier this year and I got an A* in AQA Sociology A-Level. If anyone wishes to ask me any questions then go ahead
How did you organise your folders? I currently have one folder for both education and family & households. Should I separate them?
0
reply
theuncannyshi
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
What as grade did you get? I got straight D’s throughout the year bc I lacked motivation throughout my subjects but managed to come out with a high A with only a few hours of last minute revision. I’m predicted an A* but it’s just those extra few marks on the 20-30 markers that pull me down. What topics did you do?
I’m doing education, families, crime and deviance and beliefs.
0
reply
T.J.A
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
What optional topics did you do in paper 2?
0
reply
user201678
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#16
(Original post by T.J.A)
What optional topics did you do in paper 2?
Health and The Media.
0
reply
T.J.A
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by user201678)
Health and The Media.
I see, I do Beliefs in Society and Families & Households. Out of education and crime which do you think is harder? I'm having a hard time understanding the neo-marxist approach to crime personally.
0
reply
user201678
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#18
(Original post by T.J.A)
I see, I do Beliefs in Society and Families & Households. Out of education and crime which do you think is harder? I'm having a hard time understanding the neo-marxist approach to crime personally.
Personally, I think crime is without doubt harder. This is because of the sheer volume of content that you have to learn for crime. Also I think education is a lot easier as the concepts don’t take long to understand and the types of essay questions (30 markers) you can get are quite limited - it will either be on gender differences, ethnic differences, class differences, role of the education system, Marxist/Functionalist perspective of the education system or on privatisation/marketisation policies.

Now, since you are struggling with Neo-Marxist approaches to crime, let’s go through it very briefly:

- Neo-Marxists argue that Marxist theories are DETERMINISTIC as Marxist theories suggest that people are driven into crime by forces beyond their control. Neo-Marxists suggest crime is a VOLUNTARY ACT: no one is forced to commit crime.

- Neo-Marxists argue that working class crimes are meaningful and symbolic political acts of resistance to ruling class oppression. Neo-Marxists ROMANTICISE working class crime: they view criminals like Robin Hood who are fighting against inequality in society.

- Gilroy (a Neo-Marxist) argues that black crime is seen as a form or resistance to ruling-class oppression in the form of police racism and harassment. So, black people aren’t forced by the capitalism system to commit crime (as Marxists would argue), but instead they commit crime as they ACTIVELY wish to fight back against oppression.

- So, the key thing is that Neo-Marxists believe that working class criminals are ACTIVE in committing crime. On the other hand, Marxists believe that people’s behaviour is moulded by social structures such as capitalism - the capitalist system makes people want to own valuables and so it forces them into crime.

- Neo-Marxist theories also include The New Criminology who basically merge interactionism (labelling-theory) and Marxism. A really nice study for this is Hall et. al who suggests that crime is used to establish and ensure the perpetuation of ruling-class hegemony. So, this was achieved by the media (who is run by the ruling-class) and they used blacks as scapegoats in order to heighten the tension surrounding black crime and create a moral panic - black crime is over-exaggerated and so the general public become scared and frightened. Thus, this justifies more aggressive policing and so it ensures that the police force work harder in general to maintain control of society and so it re-asserts ruling class hegemony and ensures everyone is maintaining to the status-quo.

- Finally, there are a few evaluation points that need to be made:
• Firstly, you may have noticed that this theory appears to neglect relating crime to gender. This is something feminists especially would note as a disadvantage.
- Some may argue that rigid policing may not just be reflecting ruling-class interests but it’s actually the police who are protecting society from crime.
- Neo-Marxists also neglect victims of crime and instead portray crime as arguably positive - they believe it’s a resistance to authority which makes crime seem somewhat daring and brave.

I hope this helped. If you have any questions please feel free to PM me.
0
reply
user201678
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#19
(Original post by seokjin's laugh)
How did you organise your folders? I currently have one folder for both education and family & households. Should I separate them?
They are on two different topics on two different exam papers so I would separate them. I didn’t really use a folder. I had plastic wallets with all my notes in one plastic wallet for that one exam so the night before I can just pick it up and read it.
0
reply
user201678
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#20
(Original post by theuncannyshi)
What as grade did you get? I got straight D’s throughout the year bc I lacked motivation throughout my subjects but managed to come out with a high A with only a few hours of last minute revision. I’m predicted an A* but it’s just those extra few marks on the 20-30 markers that pull me down. What topics did you do?
I’m doing education, families, crime and deviance and beliefs.
For AS I got an A. I did Education, Health, The Media and Crime and Deviance. To be honest, you clearly are capable of getting an A*. I think the best thing in order to do well in your 20/30 markers is to do practice essays and get your teacher to mark them. Make sure you have plenty of knowledge in your essays with evaluation, analysis and link back to the item and the question and you will get top marks.
Last edited by user201678; 1 year ago
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you confident you could find support for your mental health if you needed it in COVID-19?

Yes (50)
22.42%
No (173)
77.58%

Watched Threads

View All