Gohltogo
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Currently, I am thoroughly enjoying physics at A-level and I have a quite a big passion for Engineering. In future, I am hoping to find a job line in one area of Engineering. However, I'm not sure which area of engineering to go into. In physics, I like to mathematical side and the areas like forces and motion and nuclear (basically the engineering side).I'm not sure whether to go into an apprenticeship with a company such as Rolls Royce in manufacturing engineering or to study some form of engineering at University. Could anyone help with recommendations of well paid engineering jobs and the path I should follow to get into these job lines? I don't want to hone in on one area in case I don't enjoy in, leaving me with nothing. Thank you
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Svesh
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Oxbridge, Durham, Warwick offer General engineering so you can study all disciplines the first year then specialise 2nd or third year into a field you enjoy.
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DerivativeName
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If you're not sure on what area you want to go into, doing a full degree is your best bet. Most Unis have a common first year for engineering, which means you can apply for a general engineering course and then choose a specialism after you've done a year doing general courses and trying out different diceplines. I know for certain Warwick does this, and in sure other places to, but I'm not an engineering student do I couldn't help too much with specific institutions.

The problem with an apprenticeship is that they're so specific that you will definitely limit yourself to a small area of engineering, whereas a degree is going to be more general. Also if you're enjoying physics Alevel, a degree is going to be more theoretical than an apprenticeship, so you might enjoy that more

. Really unless you're desperate to start earning or really don't want the debt, uni is your best bet.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Gohltogo)
Currently, I am thoroughly enjoying physics at A-level and I have a quite a big passion for Engineering. In future, I am hoping to find a job line in one area of Engineering. However, I'm not sure which area of engineering to go into. In physics, I like to mathematical side and the areas like forces and motion and nuclear (basically the engineering side).I'm not sure whether to go into an apprenticeship with a company such as Rolls Royce in manufacturing engineering or to study some form of engineering at University. Could anyone help with recommendations of well paid engineering jobs and the path I should follow to get into these job lines? I don't want to hone in on one area in case I don't enjoy in, leaving me with nothing. Thank you
Do you want to work in the Engineering industry? If so then any area will be fine - automotive, electrical, mechanical, motorsport all have overlapping modules so you will not be pigeonholed.
I'd avoid Oxbridge and look for a degree with a year in industry and where you will learn the right skills for the workplace.
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Guarddyyy
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Either general engineering or mechanical engineering
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Azzor
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Hello mate, Have you considered doing Aerospace Engineering? You get to do a lot physics, aerodynamics, calculus, thermodynamics, etc. etc. I believe you would like as you enjoy physics and mathematics. I personally did BEng + MSc in Aerospace Engineering. I am currently working as a graduate manufacturing engineer in a Tier 1 automotive supplier (but looking to move to aerospace again), I get a decent salary for a graduate with 0 experience. I would suggest you go to uni. I see apprenticeships a way to get practical experience faster but I am not sure if you will be able to get as much "academic" knowledge instead of going to uni. You could definitely go to uni and after finishing it getting into a Graduate Programme. Hope this helps a bit.
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Student-95
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(Original post by Azzor)
Hello mate, Have you considered doing Aerospace Engineering? You get to do a lot physics, aerodynamics, calculus, thermodynamics, etc. etc. I believe you would like as you enjoy physics and mathematics. I personally did BEng + MSc in Aerospace Engineering. I am currently working as a graduate manufacturing engineer in a Tier 1 automotive supplier (but looking to move to aerospace again), I get a decent salary for a graduate with 0 experience. I would suggest you go to uni. I see apprenticeships a way to get practical experience faster but I am not sure if you will be able to get as much "academic" knowledge instead of going to uni. You could definitely go to uni and after finishing it getting into a Graduate Programme. Hope this helps a bit.
Mechanical is probably the best bet (aside from general but most unis don't offer that) if you're unsure but your choices will be very broad with any engineering discipline. Rolls-Royce's manufacturing engineering grad scheme for example accepts any degree in engineering, maths, physical science or computer science.
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Gohltogo
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(Original post by Svesh)
Oxbridge, Durham, Warwick offer General engineering so you can study all disciplines the first year then specialise 2nd or third year into a field you enjoy.
So if I were to study general engineering then specialise in a field (mechanical engineering for instance), how many years of University would that be around?
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Gohltogo)
So if I were to study general engineering then specialise in a field (mechanical engineering for instance), how many years of University would that be around?
I would not do General Engineering - it's not necessary as there is so much overlap. Look for plenty of CAD and design modules - and a good Formula Student team shows that students are learning 'real' skills.
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Doones
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(Original post by Gohltogo)
So if I were to study general engineering then specialise in a field (mechanical engineering for instance), how many years of University would that be around?
The same as someone doing MechEng (or whatever) from the start - so 3 years for BEng, or 4 years for MEng, with a year in industry (usually between Y2 and Y3) if you chose to do one.

You just specialise a little later in the course (or not at all if you don't want to).
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