How do I revise effectively? Is my revision good enough? Watch

Mythology
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Hi everyone,

I started revision for my GCSEs about 2 weeks ago. I've been making flashcards for Geography and EPR specifically. I've used Quizlet for English quotes and some French. I've begun using revision books with questions for Maths too. I also use a couple of apps for questions.

I'm worried about whether or not this is contributing to my knowledge, will it reinforce it enough to aid me in my exams?

I get incredibly easily distracted though and often find myself doing other things.

What's the most effective way I can revise?? Any suggestions on what I can do to manage my distractions??

Thank you
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Adacic
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wtf i started revision in april/may
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James1908
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Hi. I am in Y11 and my GCSEs are soon. I recommend using a revision guide to make summary notes for every unit. Then, remember your notes by repeatedly writing them down or saying them out loud. Then you should do exam practise questions.
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Wooord
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(Original post by Adacic)
wtf i started revision in april/may
Literally same. Wish I was this motivated tbh
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vickkyyx
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I would say what you are doing rn is really good but if itโ€™s not effective for you then you need try something else.For me I do flash cards,mindmaps,telling my friends about a particular topic e.g. history so like I am teaching them about certain thing but in the same time I constantly keep it in my mind.I would also maybe say to review a topic once youโ€™re down with it (read through it,or do mindmap or make a summary)
Do many past papers/practice questions
For french coz I also did it as gcse I would recommend you reading french articles,watching movies in french with subtitles on,it not only improves your listening skills but also pronouncation too.It worked for me and I got an A.I hope this will help and Goodluck with your GCSEs ๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š
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Mythology
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(Original post by Wooord)
Literally same. Wish I was this motivated tbh
School is nagging at me to do it and I just see it as the more I do now the less I'll have to do later :'0
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Mythology
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(Original post by Adacic)
wtf i started revision in april/may
School recommended for me to begin now aha :')
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Adacic
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(Original post by xVB)
Hi everyone,

I started revision for my GCSEs about 2 weeks ago. I've been making flashcards for Geography and EPR specifically. I've used Quizlet for English quotes and some French. I've begun using revision books with questions for Maths too. I also use a couple of apps for questions.

I'm worried about whether or not this is contributing to my knowledge, will it reinforce it enough to aid me in my exams?

I get incredibly easily distracted though and often find myself doing other things.

What's the most effective way I can revise?? Any suggestions on what I can do to manage my distractions??

Thank you
I made notes from textbooks and memorised them. Then do a ton of practice questions. To get rid of distractions just turn off all human contact and you will be fine.
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Mythology
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(Original post by James1908)
Hi. I am in Y11 and my GCSEs are soon. I recommend using a revision guide to make summary notes for every unit. Then, remember your notes by repeatedly writing them down or saying them out loud. Then you should do exam practise questions.
Thanks so much!! I'll give it a go
Good luck with your GCSEs!!
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AngelStarfire
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That sounds great! I have my Year 11 mocks soon but I still havenโ€™t started revising for them or even GCSEs(>_< )
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Mythology
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(Original post by AngelStarfire)
That sounds great! I have my Year 11 mocks soon but I still havenโ€™t started revising for them or even GCSEs(>_< )
Thank you so much!! Make sure not to stress too much about mocks :O Good luck!!
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James1908
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(Original post by xVB)
Thanks so much!! I'll give it a go
Good luck with your GCSEs!!
Thanks. Good luck to u as well. Remember though to keep notes basic, understandable and concise. don't make notes on things that are irelevent, that you are not required to know for the exa! (Exam board/specification)
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Mythology
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(Original post by James1908)
Thanks. Good luck to u as well. Remember though to keep notes basic, understandable and concise. don't make notes on things that are irelevent, that you are not required to know for the exa! (Exam board/specification)
Thank you so much!! That's a very good idea, I'll have to cut down on the amount of info I put in my flashcards ๐Ÿ˜‚
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Jess104
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For GCSEs I did flashcards for the three sciences - one per every page or two of the CGP revision guides. Revised by doing lots of exam questions, speaking notes outloud, writing down keywords/definitions repetitively. When we neared exams I just spent my time reading my flashcards and it worked very well. Anything I kept getting wrong I wrote on an A4 sheet and memorised. Got A*s in the scienes and by doing a just few flashcards a day it never felt like I was overloaded with content I couldn't keep up with.
For the maths I did a bunch of questions and past exam papers, even those from other exam boards (but same topics of course). Printed out the specification and made sure I had an example question of each specific thing we had to be able to do which reassured me I had covered everything.
For English Language I just did loads of questions and worked hard during class. English Literature I annotated everything we were given in detail - I feel for English/RE you just need to work hard and develop the writing skills during class, rather than revise at home beyond whatever homework you get. For RE I only memorised the quotes that were easiest as you really don't need them all.
For Geography I made sure I understood the content and for some weird reason, although I dreaded the lessons, I loved to revise the content - most of the physical geography involved long processes which were satisfying to write about ๐Ÿ˜‚ I imagined each point I described/explained getting me another mark for that question from the examiner. Felt kind of like maths in that way.
For German I only got a B, but lessons were a living hell, making me hate studying it. I would focus on listening to/reading articles in the language you're studying for enjoyment so you can learn to easily pick out key words and decipher meaning from context. Then when under pressure in the exam you should do fine.
For ICT we didn't get taught any of the theory in class because our teacher left early in the year. So I just purchased a revision guide and spent hours upon hours upon hours memorising the sentences, despite not understanding them. Luckily, the subject was coursework based, allowing my merit in the exam to balance to a distinction star overall ๐Ÿ˜… In conclusion, I do not reccomended wasting time remembering things you don't understand. I also don't reccomended memorising long chunks of info. without some sort of tune, mneumonic or story to go along with it.

I used a lot of revision apps but honestly they didn't help me at all and were just a way of procrastinating, trying to believe I was spending time working. Revision apps could be used when traveling, but really if you know you aren't retaining the information by using them you'd be better off using that time to de-stress, allowing you to feel refreshed and ready to revise later.

Try making a revision plan, but not a strict or full one if you're likely to fail at sticking to it as that feels very un-motivating. Even at A-Levels I couldn't stick to a strict timetable, I just knew when I had free time and the energy to revise I would go and do it. Our school was very obsessive about how many hours we should be doing independently each week, but those we spent that time highlighting, writing pretty notes ect. were just wasting time imo. Alternatively, try proven methods of memorising topics such as testing yourself (exam Qs, flashcards), writing out from memory, using keywords/pictures as prompts, teaching the content to a sibling/peer/parent amoung others.

^ I hope you can find some reasonable advice in my waffling ๐Ÿ˜
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Mythology
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(Original post by Jess104)
For GCSEs I did flashcards for the three sciences - one per every page or two of the CGP revision guides. Revised by doing lots of exam questions, speaking notes outloud, writing down keywords/definitions repetitively. When we neared exams I just spent my time reading my flashcards and it worked very well. Anything I kept getting wrong I wrote on an A4 sheet and memorised. Got A*s in the scienes and by doing a just few flashcards a day it never felt like I was overloaded with content I couldn't keep up with.
For the maths I did a bunch of questions and past exam papers, even those from other exam boards (but same topics of course). Printed out the specification and made sure I had an example question of each specific thing we had to be able to do which reassured me I had covered everything.
For English Language I just did loads of questions and worked hard during class. English Literature I annotated everything we were given in detail - I feel for English/RE you just need to work hard and develop the writing skills during class, rather than revise at home beyond whatever homework you get. For RE I only memorised the quotes that were easiest as you really don't need them all.
For Geography I made sure I understood the content and for some weird reason, although I dreaded the lessons, I loved to revise the content - most of the physical geography involved long processes which were satisfying to write about ๐Ÿ˜‚ I imagined each point I described/explained getting me another mark for that question from the examiner. Felt kind of like maths in that way.
For German I only got a B, but lessons were a living hell, making me hate studying it. I would focus on listening to/reading articles in the language you're studying for enjoyment so you can learn to easily pick out key words and decipher meaning from context. Then when under pressure in the exam you should do fine.
For ICT we didn't get taught any of the theory in class because our teacher left early in the year. So I just purchased a revision guide and spent hours upon hours upon hours memorising the sentences, despite not understanding them. Luckily, the subject was coursework based, allowing my merit in the exam to balance to a distinction star overall ๐Ÿ˜… In conclusion, I do not reccomended wasting time remembering things you don't understand. I also don't reccomended memorising long chunks of info. without some sort of tune, mneumonic or story to go along with it.

I used a lot of revision apps but honestly they didn't help me at all and were just a way of procrastinating, trying to believe I was spending time working. Revision apps could be used when traveling, but really if you know you aren't retaining the information by using them you'd be better off using that time to de-stress, allowing you to feel refreshed and ready to revise later.

Try making a revision plan, but not a strict or full one if you're likely to fail at sticking to it as that feels very un-motivating. Even at A-Levels I couldn't stick to a strict timetable, I just knew when I had free time and the energy to revise I would go and do it. Our school was very obsessive about how many hours we should be doing independently each week, but those we spent that time highlighting, writing pretty notes ect. were just wasting time imo. Alternatively, try proven methods of memorising topics such as testing yourself (exam Qs, flashcards), writing out from memory, using keywords/pictures as prompts, teaching the content to a sibling/peer/parent amoung others.

^ I hope you can find some reasonable advice in my waffling ๐Ÿ˜
Thank you so much for your amazing answer!! I really appreciate it It's really helped me out; I'll defo give it a go!!
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