Why is university so expensive?

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Anonymous #1
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#1
Please tell me why it’s 9k a year. Just to study?
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Anonymous #2
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Because the government hates us. It wasn't long ago it was a third of that.
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BFG9000
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#3
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It's not like in the USA, where you have to take a real commercial loan and start paying right after graduation $500+/month just on interests on your $200,000 degree.
In the UK you will be paying £7 a week when you start working and later on £20... Education in the UK is free....
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by BFG9000)
It's not like in the USA, where you have to take a real commercial loan and start paying right after graduation $500+/month just on interests on your $200,000 degree.
In the UK you will be paying £7 a week when you start working and later on £20... Education in the UK is free....
We shouldn’t be paying at all.
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Sinnoh
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#5
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¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Cheaper than most private schools
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SomeWelshGuy123
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Equivelant of a few quit a weekafter you graduate and most will never pay close to the full amount.
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Anonymous #3
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It's 9k tuition because the government wanted to invest money into UK university establishments. The majority of us will never even pay a quarter back of our original loan, let alone interest. One could argue then that it's those 'who can afford to' who do end up paying things back, but more often than not if someone comes from a rich background they would have self funded anyway... which means that those who do end up paying back their loans are merely being punished for doing so well post graduation. It's a stupid system that makes no sense.

Oh we have no money for public sector, emergency services or the NHS? let's triple the amount we're throwing at unis so principles who never even show their face can line their pockets and a few can build new librarys.

Upping the fees also ups the sense of exclusivity which attracts foreign students - bringing more money to the UK.
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BFG9000
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(Original post by Anonymous)
We shouldn’t be paying at all.
Well, someone has to pay for it eventually. There should be some sort of incentive system. STEM would be for free but literature or sociology for £15,000 a year.
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Bio 7
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I love these threads, makes me so happy I’m in Scotland.
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idk01
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#10
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It's because the government were stupid in thinking that most unis wouldn't charge the maximum fee of £9000
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maah001
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#11
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Someone has to pay for the lecturers, support staff, facilities, libraries, laboratories etc., why not the people who benefit from it?

Also, you are not paying for it directly, the Government pays for your tuition, and a big chunk of your living costs (you do not have to find the money up front). You just have to pay a bit more tax when you earn enough after you graduate. If you never earn enough, you don't pay. If, as a result of your higher qualification, you earn more, then you pay back a contribution. As previously mentioned, a large proportion will never have to pay back the full amount of the student "loan".

If you just want to study without paying to do so, then just get some books out of your local library and teach yourself.
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Other_Owl
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#12
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Thanks to Bliar he wanted 50% to go to university the fees where introduced in 1998 as £1k then next year to £3k then tripled to £9K in 2010. Now it's down to 48%, you can see why many European Universities are offering courses in English under FoM if we start university up to 2020 we can access the domestic
fees and after that we are protected from the international fees. The Old Grumpies who voted leave got all their education paid for.
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Dysf(x)al
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#13
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Please tell me why it’s 9k a year. Just to study?
It doesn't really cost £9k per year. You only start paying the loan off once you earn more than a certain amount (£25k per year right now I think), and even then only a percentage of your wages. Most people never actually pay it off in full - it gets written off after 30 years. For the majority, it's effectively more of a "graduate tax" than a cost.

If you think you're being ripped off, many courses (especially medicine and sciences with lots of lab work) cost far more than £9k per year per student to run. Take a look at your uni of choice's international student fees and you'll see what I mean.
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Jono*
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In France it is free, except for the 200 euro registration fee, damn, gonna take years to work that off...
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Heyok
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#15
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(Original post by Dysf(x)al)
It doesn't really cost £9k per year. You only start paying the loan off once you earn more than a certain amount (£25k per year right now I think), and even then only a percentage of your wages. Most people never actually pay it off in full - it gets written off after 30 years. For the majority, it's effectively more of a "graduate tax" than a cost.

If you think you're being ripped off, many courses (especially medicine and sciences with lots of lab work) cost far more than £9k per year per student to run. Take a look at your uni of choice's international student fees and you'll see what I mean.
Exactly.
International students pay 50k at Cambridge for medicine, per year...
and let's not forget the other 10-15k for maintenance.
etc
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username3890778
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#16
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Disgusting
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Neilos
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#17
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It's not expensive.
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nexttime
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#18
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#18
That is the cost of the land, the buildings, the maintenance, the security, the equipment, the administration, the marketing, the admissions process... and then the actual degree of course.

I personally think its fair that those who benefit from the degree are the ones who pay for it. Although the interest rate is too high and the way the government has used loans as a form of credit to justify budget decisions is clearly highly questionable.
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Helloworld_95
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#19
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(Original post by Jono*)
In France it is free, except for the registration fee, damn, gonna take years to work that off...
At French public universities it's free, but the French public universities aren't particularly well respected, similar to ex-polys in the UK. For Grande Écoles you're looking at about 14-15,000 euros for tuition fees each year.
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6085
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(Original post by Bio 7)
I love these threads, makes me so happy I’m in Scotland.
One positive soul
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