LSE Management Student - Overview and AMA Watch

lse201819
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Hi all - So, I'm going to post what I really wish I had known prior to LSE and answer some questions (have a lot of studying, so there may be a delay). I am a one year master's student in the management department.

1. The ages range from 20 to 40+ -- No one looks at you weird if you're the youngest or the oldest.. frankly, they don't care. Do you care if there's a 50 year old in your class? Do you care if there's a 19 year old in your class? Nope, neither does anyone else.

2. Social life - This seems to be an important topic on these forums, so here goes. I'm 30, a little older, I'm over the undergraduate style of socializing -- not so into getting drunk at every opportunity. That said, this life style IS available lol. You have plenty of people that will go get a beer/coffee/sit in the park/etc at the drop of a hat and then you have people that you'll see in class and never again. It is what you make of it -- everyone is new to London, so most people don't have established friend networks and are looking to meet people. LSE provides plenty of opportunities to socially engage (societies, welcome week, etc), so if socializing is what you're into... it's there. On the flipside -- there is absolutely NO pressure to socialize whatsoever. No one is forcing you to do anything at this school, nor do they particularly care. So, if you're like me and are here to study, get your degree, and return to the work force (for more money)-- there's no pressure to "Network, network, network" like a typical MBA.

3. The coursework - Let me emphasize THIS IS NOT AN MBA. While there are case studies, this is academically driven. Some readings drive me nuts because I couldn't care less about what two academics are arguing about in their respective papers, nor can i see it helping me professionally. As a manager, I don't sit and think about which theoretical framework my decision fits in -- no, I make the decision and move on. So -- the lack of practicality is often frustrating. You will read, read, read, read, and read... then when you're done.. you'll read some more. The reading is briefly interrupted with seminars and lectures.

4. Lectures and Seminars - Lectures basically consists of everyone in your course in a big room listening to a world renowned professor speak for an hour or two. Then you leave and go read on your own. Seminars/Classes are an hour and a half of a Post Doc/PHD student and sometimes a professor guiding discussion... They don't give a sh*t if the class participates or not -- if you don't answer a question -- they sit in silence until someone does, not participating only harms you, not them. Don't think that because these are elite students that they are super into participating - often, the professor asks a question an no one answers. There are some presentations in these courses, but not many.

5. Careers -- You're on your own. LSE has plenty of employers come to campus, but you're on your own meeting and applying. When you do apply, the employers pounce. You are in demand, simply because of a brand name. Most of the time, though, you need to be proactive in reaching out to employers in your field of choice.

Finally, London and tuition aren't cheap. This program is VERY hands off. No one is forcing you to do anything. You could theoretically not show up all year, take your exams, and get your degree.... YOU ARE PAYING FOR A BRAND NAME SCHOOL and GUIDED READING. Period. In American schools, you are forced to do much much more -- at LSE, you're not.

Is it worth it? Yeah... not sure yet. From a branding and professional perspective... yes. I will make more money, I will pay off student loans quickly, and I will have the LSE brand for life. Am I learning super elite school secrets that will make me rich and able to be a ruler of the world that I couldn't learn at a state school? Of course not. Oxford, Harvard, LSE, Cambridge... Michigan, Warwick, NC State.... No difference in education, only in branding. The students at LSE are motivated and smart, that is 100% true and the network MAY be valuable in the future, but the course content is nothing that you can't learn elsewhere.

Hope this helps.
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GandalfWhite
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Good summary.

Just adding that while content, what one studies, is similar across most universities, and branding may be a significant benefit, there is also this studying amongst very competitive and so-far highly accomplished academically cohort, which should push the cohort towards higher levels than, say, in a cohort of much less in attitude and academics. Have you noticed that LSE students are very competitive?

Btw, Years 2 and 3 will have more group projects and presentations.
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by GandalfWhite)
Good summary.

Just adding that while content, what one studies, is similar across most universities, and branding may be a significant benefit, there is also this studying amongst very competitive and so-far highly accomplished academically cohort, which should push the cohort towards higher levels than, say, in a cohort of much less in attitude and academics. Have you noticed that LSE students are very competitive?

Btw, Years 2 and 3 will have more group projects and presentations.
The person states that they are a one-year masters student. They're not going to do a Year 2 or Year 3.
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GandalfWhite
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
The person states that they are a one-year masters student. They're not going to do a Year 2 or Year 3.
Oops, you are right. Missed the second line. Would have been easier if the title included Masters. Still, my bad.

Has he just finished the 1st term? If so, then the next 2 terms should have more group work. Group work is an essential tool in management courses to prepare graduates for real work situations, and presentations are also very common.
Last edited by GandalfWhite; 7 months ago
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ChenZhan
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When did you receive the offer when you first applied and what is the time allowed to accept/decline the offer for MSc MiM?
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jpt4749
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I'm also doing master degree in Department of Management at LSE. I would say the favorite thing I like about being here is the friendliness of classmates. I got to know and got on with people in my class very quickly. Although they are tremendously intelligent they are very supportive and helpful which really helped relieve the nerve from the difficulty in study materials.

The only thing I find not to pleasant is that the level of difficulty tends to jump very rapidly between each week and students without prior background in particular topic will struggle a lot.

Also I have experienced the extreme difference in satisfaction of lecturers. Some have been very supportive and understanding while some have been very terrible at explaining things and bearing with students questions.
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Presence
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(Original post by lse201819)
Hi all - So, I'm going to post what I really wish I had known prior to LSE and answer some questions (have a lot of studying, so there may be a delay). I am a one year master's student in the management department.

1. The ages range from 20 to 40+ -- No one looks at you weird if you're the youngest or the oldest.. frankly, they don't care. Do you care if there's a 50 year old in your class? Do you care if there's a 19 year old in your class? Nope, neither does anyone else.

2. Social life - This seems to be an important topic on these forums, so here goes. I'm 30, a little older, I'm over the undergraduate style of socializing -- not so into getting drunk at every opportunity. That said, this life style IS available lol. You have plenty of people that will go get a beer/coffee/sit in the park/etc at the drop of a hat and then you have people that you'll see in class and never again. It is what you make of it -- everyone is new to London, so most people don't have established friend networks and are looking to meet people. LSE provides plenty of opportunities to socially engage (societies, welcome week, etc), so if socializing is what you're into... it's there. On the flipside -- there is absolutely NO pressure to socialize whatsoever. No one is forcing you to do anything at this school, nor do they particularly care. So, if you're like me and are here to study, get your degree, and return to the work force (for more money)-- there's no pressure to "Network, network, network" like a typical MBA.

3. The coursework - Let me emphasize THIS IS NOT AN MBA. While there are case studies, this is academically driven. Some readings drive me nuts because I couldn't care less about what two academics are arguing about in their respective papers, nor can i see it helping me professionally. As a manager, I don't sit and think about which theoretical framework my decision fits in -- no, I make the decision and move on. So -- the lack of practicality is often frustrating. You will read, read, read, read, and read... then when you're done.. you'll read some more. The reading is briefly interrupted with seminars and lectures.

4. Lectures and Seminars - Lectures basically consists of everyone in your course in a big room listening to a world renowned professor speak for an hour or two. Then you leave and go read on your own. Seminars/Classes are an hour and a half of a Post Doc/PHD student and sometimes a professor guiding discussion... They don't give a sh*t if the class participates or not -- if you don't answer a question -- they sit in silence until someone does, not participating only harms you, not them. Don't think that because these are elite students that they are super into participating - often, the professor asks a question an no one answers. There are some presentations in these courses, but not many.

5. Careers -- You're on your own. LSE has plenty of employers come to campus, but you're on your own meeting and applying. When you do apply, the employers pounce. You are in demand, simply because of a brand name. Most of the time, though, you need to be proactive in reaching out to employers in your field of choice.

Finally, London and tuition aren't cheap. This program is VERY hands off. No one is forcing you to do anything. You could theoretically not show up all year, take your exams, and get your degree.... YOU ARE PAYING FOR A BRAND NAME SCHOOL and GUIDED READING. Period. In American schools, you are forced to do much much more -- at LSE, you're not.

Is it worth it? Yeah... not sure yet. From a branding and professional perspective... yes. I will make more money, I will pay off student loans quickly, and I will have the LSE brand for life. Am I learning super elite school secrets that will make me rich and able to be a ruler of the world that I couldn't learn at a state school? Of course not. Oxford, Harvard, LSE, Cambridge... Michigan, Warwick, NC State.... No difference in education, only in branding. The students at LSE are motivated and smart, that is 100% true and the network MAY be valuable in the future, but the course content is nothing that you can't learn elsewhere.

Hope this helps.
hi did u do undergrad there too? how did you write your management personal statement when you dont do management in a levels ?
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DaveZ
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hi , I hope it is okay to leave some thoughts and questions here.

I am considering to apply for a Master degree at LSE. I am mainly interested in consulting and strategy ( regarding jobs) . I would love to hear philosophy and politics lectures too, but that is a different matter.

I wondered if anyone by chance knows if there are significant differences regarding the quality of teaching, e.g. does every Master student gets to hear very renowned and great professors ? I am in particular considering the Masters in Management programms ( MiM and Strategy , MiM, and the GlobalMim). Do these programms have significant differences regarding standing and 'teaching quality?

I am also interested in Finance and Economics. My main preferences are to get to hear the best professors and to learn interesting course content . I guess at every University one can find friends and people at the same wave-length . So I am not worried at all about that.

I am looking forward to every answer and every advice I can get !

I am looking forward to
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