Inspector calls essay Watch

username4317806
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Hey please could someone mark/give me a few tips on how to improve this essay? I would really appreciate it thank you xx btw it’s only meant to be 2 paragraphs so I’m not gonna make it any longer I’m just not sure if my paragraphs relate to the question xxx

How does Priestley use the character of the inspector to suggest ways society can be improved?

In an Inspector Calls, J.B Priestley uses the inspectors final speech to enforce his own socialist views and to show how society must change or there will be consequences. This is shown when the inspector says “we don’t live alone. We are members of one body”, a metaphor for socialist ideology. J.B Priestley was a notable socialist who believed in a society where everyone is equal and looks after each other, and throughout the play Inspector Goole acts as his mouthpiece for these socialist views. The language J.B Priestley uses is very plain and the short sentences sum up the idea of collective responsibility, a message that Priestley wished to convey in this play. The pronoun “we” suggests that the Inspector is addressing everyone when giving his message of equality and J.B Priestley wants not only the characters of the Birlings but the audience in 1944 to learn and develop throughout the play. This is a didactic play and J.B Priestley wants the audience to learn the concept of social responsibility and the idea of collective guilt through the character of the inspector. J.B Priestley also shows the consequences of not realising J.B Priestley's message on how society can change when the Inspector says “if men will not learn that lesson then they will be taught in fire and blood and anguish.” This message has a biblical overtone and hellish imagery and connotations is used to suggest what will happen to the members of society who aren’t willing to change. The rule of three is used when the inspector says “fire and blood and anguish” and this emphasises how society will be destroyed if capitalist views continue. Alternatively, this quote could be an allusion to World War One in 1914, which occurs two years after the play was set. This creates dramatic irony as the play was performed to a 1944 audience so they know about World War One. J.B Priestley is implying that if society in 1912 had understood socialist ideology, then World War One may have not occurred, and is showing the 1944 audience that for war not to occur again, they must learn the inspectors message.

In an Inspector Calls, J.B Priestley uses the contrast between the inspectors impact on different characters to suggest ways that society can be improved. J.B Priestley shows how the younger generation are more likely to change and develop as a result of the inspectors message when Sheila says sarcastically to Mr and Mrs Birling at the end of the play “so there’s nothing to be sorry for, nothing to learn. We can all go on behaving just as we did”. Sheila and Eric are portrayed by J.B Priestley as realising how moral integrity matters more than capitalist interests. The younger generation are shown as having learnt the inspectors lesson and want a permanent change not only to their behaviour and their families behaviour, but to society itself. The character of the inspector shows the audience how the younger generation bear scope for change and learning. This also shows the audience how society can be changed by young people as their attitudes are more progressive and they can therefore improve society. However, the impact of the inspector on Mr and Mrs Birling directly contrasts the impact on Sheila and Eric. This is shown when, after being questioned by the inspector, Mrs Birling says “but I accept no blame for it at all”. Despite hearing about all the misfortune that Eva Smith has suffered, Mrs Birling is unmoved and stubbornly stands by her decision to turn Eva away. Mr and Mrs Birling are shown as entrenched in their capitalist views and the inspectors visit has no impact on them. The older Birling’s believe they can return to their feeling of high status and continue the same behaviour from the beginning of the play. This is shown through the cyclical structure of the play, where the older Birling’s start as having capitalist views, listen to the inspectors message about a moral agenda and collective guilt and then return to the same selfish viewpoint. This shows the audience how the older generation won’t contribute to improving society and are isolated from any feeling of social responsibility. J.B Priestley shows the inspector as only being able to change the viewpoint of the younger generation and therefore shows the audience that society can only improve through the young people.
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Nxfisax
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Maybe in your 2nd paragraph include something how the young generation show potential to be the change for the future . The older generation are ingrained with their selfish views
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username4317806
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(Original post by Nxfisax)
Maybe in your 2nd paragraph include something how the young generation show potential to be the change for the future . The older generation are ingrained with their selfish views
okay thank you!
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entertainmyfaith
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this is a really well written essay(??); your analysis is very good and you're able to weave context into your essay naturally
perhaps you could talk about how generally the inspector is a steadfast character and does not react emotionally thus he's seen as the one with the most self control; mr birling constantly losing his temper and lashing out makes him look even more foolish next to the inspector.
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username4317806
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(Original post by entertainmyfaith)
this is a really well written essay(??); your analysis is very good and you're able to weave context into your essay naturally
perhaps you could talk about how generally the inspector is a steadfast character and does not react emotionally thus he's seen as the one with the most self control; mr birling constantly losing his temper and lashing out makes him look even more foolish next to the inspector.
Thanks very much! I’ll try and add your point into the second paragraph ☺️
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hellohellothere
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would be nice if you embed your quotes.
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death07/08/17
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(Original post by Lara2004)
Hey please could someone mark/give me a few tips on how to improve this essay? I would really appreciate it thank you xx btw it’s only meant to be 2 paragraphs so I’m not gonna make it any longer I’m just not sure if my paragraphs relate to the question xxx

How does Priestley use the character of the inspector to suggest ways society can be improved?

In an Inspector Calls, J.B Priestley uses the inspectors final speech to enforce his own socialist views and to show how society must change or there will be consequences. This is shown when the inspector says “we don’t live alone. We are members of one body”, a metaphor for socialist ideology. J.B Priestley was a notable socialist who believed in a society where everyone is equal and looks after each other, and throughout the play Inspector Goole acts as his mouthpiece for these socialist views. The language J.B Priestley uses is very plain and the short sentences sum up the idea of collective responsibility, a message that Priestley wished to convey in this play. The pronoun “we” suggests that the Inspector is addressing everyone when giving his message of equality and J.B Priestley wants not only the characters of the Birlings but the audience in 1944 to learn and develop throughout the play. This is a didactic play and J.B Priestley wants the audience to learn the concept of social responsibility and the idea of collective guilt through the character of the inspector. J.B Priestley also shows the consequences of not realising J.B Priestley's message on how society can change when the Inspector says “if men will not learn that lesson then they will be taught in fire and blood and anguish.” This message has a biblical overtone and hellish imagery and connotations is used to suggest what will happen to the members of society who aren’t willing to change. The rule of three is used when the inspector says “fire and blood and anguish” and this emphasises how society will be destroyed if capitalist views continue. Alternatively, this quote could be an allusion to World War One in 1914, which occurs two years after the play was set. This creates dramatic irony as the play was performed to a 1944 audience so they know about World War One. J.B Priestley is implying that if society in 1912 had understood socialist ideology, then World War One may have not occurred, and is showing the 1944 audience that for war not to occur again, they must learn the inspectors message.

In an Inspector Calls, J.B Priestley uses the contrast between the inspectors impact on different characters to suggest ways that society can be improved. J.B Priestley shows how the younger generation are more likely to change and develop as a result of the inspectors message when Sheila says sarcastically to Mr and Mrs Birling at the end of the play “so there’s nothing to be sorry for, nothing to learn. We can all go on behaving just as we did”. Sheila and Eric are portrayed by J.B Priestley as realising how moral integrity matters more than capitalist interests. The younger generation are shown as having learnt the inspectors lesson and want a permanent change not only to their behaviour and their families behaviour, but to society itself. The character of the inspector shows the audience how the younger generation bear scope for change and learning. This also shows the audience how society can be changed by young people as their attitudes are more progressive and they can therefore improve society. However, the impact of the inspector on Mr and Mrs Birling directly contrasts the impact on Sheila and Eric. This is shown when, after being questioned by the inspector, Mrs Birling says “but I accept no blame for it at all”. Despite hearing about all the misfortune that Eva Smith has suffered, Mrs Birling is unmoved and stubbornly stands by her decision to turn Eva away. Mr and Mrs Birling are shown as entrenched in their capitalist views and the inspectors visit has no impact on them. The older Birling’s believe they can return to their feeling of high status and continue the same behaviour from the beginning of the play. This is shown through the cyclical structure of the play, where the older Birling’s start as having capitalist views, listen to the inspectors message about a moral agenda and collective guilt and then return to the same selfish viewpoint. This shows the audience how the older generation won’t contribute to improving society and are isolated from any feeling of social responsibility. J.B Priestley shows the inspector as only being able to change the viewpoint of the younger generation and therefore shows the audience that society can only improve through the young people.
I think you are perhaps a little vague at points: what are the "consequences"? I'd also comment on the necessity of the second phone call, just to try and push some more of the favourite marking points that an examiner would have. Good essay though.
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Ghost_0
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Just to say theres a youtube channel called J Brierley and he has the best inspector calls resources
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