mailiegalgas
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i was wondering if plant cells contain flagellum or cilia?
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OxFossil
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(Original post by mailiegalgas)
i was wondering if plant cells contain flagellum or cilia?
Sure. The most obvious examples I can think of are in the gametes eg of bryophytes (mosses) and gymnospores. But I'm sure there are many others
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StriderHort
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Apparently the majority don't.

"Features
Flagella are tail- or whip-like structures that protrude from some animal cells. The most familiar example is probably the exceptionally long flagellum found on sperm cells. By lashing to and fro, the flagellum drives the cell forward and powers its motion.

Types
Most plant cells lack flagella; they have no need to move and hence no need for this means of propulsion. Some plant species, however, produce flagellated sperm that can swim through water to reach the egg. Consequently, plant cells typically lack flagella, although plant sperm cells are flagellated.

Considerations
According to a 2001 article in the journal "Plant Physiology," the ancestors of modern plants are believed to have been flagellated. Plant cells lost the ability to assemble flagella during their evolution."


So that does tie into what Ox said about Gametes/Sperms, and this being something more associated with lower order plants.
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StriderHort
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And this

"The basic plant cell shares a similar construction motif with the typical eukaryote cell, but does not have centrioles, lysosomes, intermediate filaments, cilia, or flagella, as does the animal cell. Plant cells do, however, have a number of other specialized structures, including a rigid cell wall, central vacuole, plasmodesmata, and chloroplasts. Although plants (and their typical cells) are non-motile, some species produce gametes that do exhibit flagella and are, therefore, able to move about."

(I'm a hort student and still had to go and look up WTF a Flagella was )
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OxFossil
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(Original post by StriderHort)
And this

"The basic plant cell shares a similar construction motif with the typical eukaryote cell, but does not have centrioles, lysosomes, intermediate filaments, cilia, or flagella, as does the animal cell. Plant cells do, however, have a number of other specialized structures, including a rigid cell wall, central vacuole, plasmodesmata, and chloroplasts. Although plants (and their typical cells) are non-motile, some species produce gametes that do exhibit flagella and are, therefore, able to move about."

(I'm a hort student and still had to go and look up WTF a Flagella was )
Glad someone was diligent enough to look it up! Lynn Margulis used to argue that flagella and cilia are derived from endosymbionts like mitochondria and chloroplasts, but I think that idea has been discarded now.
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