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tiger_vio
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#1
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Ok I REALLY need help with this, the whole concept is driving me insane.
So in 1966 Baddeley set up an experiment to see whether in the short-term memory, information is coded semantically or acoustically.
He gave some participants with words that were acoustically similiar, like house, mouse, etc.. and other participants had words that were semantically similar like clean, neat, tidy etc.
I get his study up to there. Then I have a complete mental block which I have not been able to get over for about a year now on this study :mad:

So he found that after immediate recall, participants with the acoustically similar words got confused, but those with semantically similar words did not and were better at the task.

Apparantly this means that short term memory coding is acoustic, not semantic.. but I don't understand why!! I dont get the link- why is it that because acoustically similar participants recalled less words, that means the STM is responsible for acoustic coding?! Argh, someone help? :mad:
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paperclip
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if you remember a word in terms of sounds then it's easier to get confused between them when you have a long list (think of it in terms of "she sells sea shells by the sea shore"; when you think about it it's easy to do it, but when you try to say it fast you just get confused)

does that make sense?
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tiger_vio
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(Original post by paperclip)
if you remember a word in terms of sounds then it's easier to get confused between them when you have a long list (think of it in terms of "she sells sea shells by the sea shore"; when you think about it it's easy to do it, but when you try to say it fast you just get confused)

does that make sense?
Yes it does- but I think the thing I don't understand is..
I get that we're more likely to confuse words that sound the same, but whats that got to do with memory?

I just link that logically, if the STM codes things by sound, participants would do BETTER recalling similar sounding words. Also, if the STM is acoustic, then how come participants remember MORE words that are semantic, if the STM doesn't even code semantically?!?
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paperclip
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(Original post by tiger_vio)
Yes it does- but I think the thing I don't understand is..
I get that we're more likely to confuse words that sound the same, but whats that got to do with memory?

I just link that logically, if the STM codes things by sound, participants would do BETTER recalling similar sounding words. Also, if the STM is acoustic, then how come participants remember MORE words that are semantic, if the STM doesn't even code semantically?!?
i think it has to do with interference in memory; one word will interfere with another, etc

and because the words had to be placed in the correct order i think made it harder; try to get your friends to do it to you (the similar sounding ones would get confused whereas the ones with distinct sound will have a place)

acoustically similar
man
mad
map
mat
mar

acoustically dissimilar
pen
day
now
dot
box
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tiger_vio
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Thanks paperclip! Im still not getting it 100% though I just think that if the STM coded things acoustically, wouldnt we be *better* at recalling similar words? :confused: How come we remember words with similar meanings better when the STM doesnt even code for semantics?
Cheers
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artorscience?
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When you try and remember similar sounding words they become linked with each other which means that you can't remember what words were there, just that they all sounded thus. Because the words are only in STM they haven't been asosiated with meaning, they are just sounds that your memory is going to be repeating to help it remember.

The words with similar meanings were easier to recall because as they were coded acoustically they were all different. Each word was put in a different pigeon hole whereas the one that sounded the same were all placed in the same pigeon hole and so were recalled jumbled up. (Does that make it any clearer?)

Recall had nothing to do with the semantics.
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tiger_vio
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(Original post by artorscience?)
When you try and remember similar sounding words they become linked with each other which means that you can't remember what words were there, just that they all sounded thus. Because the words are only in STM they haven't been asosiated with meaning, they are just sounds that your memory is going to be repeating to help it remember.

The words with similar meanings were easier to recall because as they were coded acoustically they were all different. Each word was put in a different pigeon hole whereas the one that sounded the same were all placed in the same pigeon hole and so were recalled jumbled up. (Does that make it any clearer?)

Recall had nothing to do with the semantics.
#

Ahhhhh yes that makes it so much clearer!
So just to clarify- the STM codes acoustically, but the LTM codes acoustically and semantically- therefore we remember more when things go into the LTM because they are coded in both?
So that means Baddeley wanted to test if the STM coded acoustically and the LTM coded acoustically and semantically.. and because the STM ONLY codes acoustically, (therefore the words only go in one 'pigeon hole'), people confuse similar sounding words! Is that it!?

Wait a minute.. does that mean that that similar sounding words go into the STM, but the words that have the same meanings go into the LTM straight away because the LTM codes for semantics?
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artorscience?
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(Original post by tiger_vio)
Wait a minute.. does that mean that that similar sounding words go into the STM, but the words that have the same meanings go into the LTM straight away because the LTM codes for semantics?
No, everything has to go to the STM and in the STM is processed acoustically. When anything has been "remembered" it is processed in LTM where it is stored according to its meaning.


(Original post by tiger_vio)
...people confuse similar sounding words! Is that it!?
To simplify everything, yes that's it Well it's all you need to know. :p:
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tiger_vio
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(Original post by artorscience?)
No, everything has to go to the STM and in the STM is processed acoustically. When anything has been "remembered" it is processed in LTM where it is stored according to its meaning.
Ahh ok.

So.. to summarise (:p: i hope this is right)
Because the STM only codes acoustically, the participants with the similar sounding words got confused
But with the similar meaning words, the words went from the STM to the LTM where they were coded semantically, and were therefore remembered better?
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artorscience?
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(Original post by tiger_vio)
But with the similar meaning words, the words went from the STM to the LTM where they were coded semantically, and were therefore remembered better?
All the words that were repeated enough got "remembered" in the LTM and were coded semantically which means that they were more easily recalled as they were stored together as similar meaning words, yes.
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tiger_vio
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Got it now. I think before my logic just said that if the STM coded acoustically, it would be better at similar sounding words.. but now I realise that it's because the STM is acoustic that it gets confused- because you are throwing all these similar sounding words at it, therefore it can't keep up and gets confused :P

Thanks for your help aos, will give you rep tommorow
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Caits24
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I am so pleased I'm not the only one that doesn't understand it either, I completely agree with you
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