aliceaquaspirit
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Has anyone done a law degree at university? What kind of stuff do you do/is it really competitive and exhausting?
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aliceaquaspirit
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has anyone done a law degree at university? is it hard? what do you do in the seminars/lectures? how smart do you have to be to be successful.
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JohanGRK
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Lectures involve someone talking at your for an hour. They outline the law and may cover any uncertainty/debates in it. Seminars/classes/tutorials/whatever they're called will usually involve you preparing some questions or material (it may just be that week's reading; it may be extra stuff) and talking about it with your teacher. The sort of material that gets covered will vary depending on the course, the class teacher you get, how comfortable you are with the fundamentals of a topic, etc.

Nearly everyone gets a 2:1 in a law degree. To get good grades that make you stand out, you need to be good at a) abstract thinking and b) sitting down doing long and boring reading that you may not particularly care about. The more reading you do, and the better you memorise it, the better you'll do, all other things being equal.
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JohanGRK
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Here's a link to a textbook on Equity. Try reading one of the introductory chapters.

A law degree is about learning the principles that underly particular areas of the law, and (depending on the topic and the university) looking at whether these are normatively justifiable. It gets a bit more complex once you get into a dissertation or do niche statute-based modules, but that's the gist of it.

No, a law degree isn't competitive, the students and the desirable graduate destinations are. It's definitely not exhausting unless you leave everything to the last minute and/or don't plan in advance. The sort of people who boast about sleeping 5 hours a night because of the workload are doing something wrong.
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aliceaquaspirit
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hey guys,
so I've been considering doing law for the last few months - I'm very strong at English and can write a good essay. my vocabulary is okay but I'm not particularly keen on public speaking. is public speaking a large part of a law degree or is it not particularly important? any answers are welcome
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JohanGRK
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It's not relevant
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cdudders
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Im no expert but as long as you don’t want to specifically be a barrister then the public speaking thing shouldn’t be a problem. You will probably be taught how to in the course anyway. You’ll gain confidence the more you learn and it shouldn’t be a problem after that.
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Crazy Jamie
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Public speaking is no part of a law degree at all. It's essential if you want to become a barrister, but even then it doesn't form any part of the actual degree. If you want to be a solicitor there's no reason why pulic speaking should ever become a notable part of what you do. You do have to do an advocacy module on the LPC, but that's about it. Nothing to be concerned about. There are plenty of people who both do law and want to be solicitors who have no interest on public speaking, so I don't see any reason why it should be an issue for you.
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Notoriety
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Public speaking -- not usually part of a law degree. Unless you mean presentations to small groups of your peers/lecturers. Some unis will make you do the latter either as part of your seminar group, formatives or the proper assessments.
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aliceaquaspirit
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how does GDL law conversion work?
for example if I did an English degree, what steps do I take to get on a law conversion course, plus how long does it take
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honestly
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(Original post by aliceaquaspirit)
how does GDL law conversion work?
for example if I did an English degree, what steps do I take to get on a law conversion course, plus how long does it take
One academic year, usually - or two part time.

To become a lawyer as such you need to study particular core units in a law degree. So, the gdl is effectively all those core units needed to progress to become a barrister/ solicitor.

Most providers will ask for at least a 2.1. For those that don't I would urger caution; gdl is no walk in the park and good academic skills are needed to do reasonably well. An English degree is a solid academic subject so its a good foundation.

Alternatives to GDL are qualifying LLM (Masters) at places such as Birkbeck and LJMU. or doing a 2 year accelerated LLB at universities which offer them.

Hope this helps.
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aliceaquaspirit
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thank u )x
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honestly
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(Original post by aliceaquaspirit)
thank u )x
anytime!
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aliceaquaspirit
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so for example
if I do an English degree and then want to become a lawyer, what are the steps to getting on a GDL.

which year of your degree do you apply for a GDL
do unis like Manchester, Durham, UCL offer gdls or not

does it matter what uni you go to to get a GDL or do employers not care

is it better to do full time (9months) or part time (26months).

how do you get sponsored by a firm? I read online that some law firms may pay for your GDL by sponsoring you while youre still at uni doing a degree.

I'm really confused so could someone clarify?)
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Notoriety
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Do ya BA.

In third year, apply for GDL.

Complete GDL over a year (or thereabouts). Normally it's the new unis which offer it. You don't do the GDL for prestige; ya just tick a box.

You can get firm funding prospectively and retrospetively. So you can apply for TC in third year of BA, and then a firm will pay for GDL. Or you could do GDL, later get the TC; and firms will pay for the GDL fees you forked out. Most firms won't pay for the GDL, though.

HOWEVER The SQE will make the GDL redundant in the next couple of years for aspiring solicitors. Currently the LLB (or the GDL) pass the academic stage, but with the SQE each student will have to pass the SQE1 to pass the academic stage. Passing your LLB or GDL won't be enough. So in theory, you could do the BA and then not do another course after -- instead self-teach the SQE1 prep.
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aliceaquaspirit
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what's the SQE?
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Notoriety
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(Original post by aliceaquaspirit)
what's the SQE?
Do I look like Jeeves.
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aliceaquaspirit
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also, I know it's easier to get a training contract if you have done a vacation scheme...is this something I would have to do during the summer of my english degree?
would I be offered a training contract before taking the GDL based off of my degree result ?
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JohanGRK
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(Original post by aliceaquaspirit)
also, I know it's easier to get a training contract if you have done a vacation scheme...is this something I would have to do during the summer of my english degree?
would I be offered a training contract before taking the GDL based off of my degree result ?
Whew - all over the place

Whether it's easier to get a TC following a VS is down to the individual firm. It's generally true, but the importance of your performance on the VS vs the exit interview varies a lot. The two extremes are A&O (VS is just a confirmation that they've chosen the right people; around 3/4s get offers) vs Slaughters (VS is separate work experience, you have to reapply for the TC and go through all the TC assessments separately in parallel with straight-TC applicants).

You can do a VS during winter, spring (Easter) or summer - summer is the most popular option. Most first-year schemes will be open to you in your second year and most full VSs will be open to you in your final year. Winter schemes will, generally speaking, only be available to you once you've graduated and are working/doing the GDL.

Yes, because they obviously don't have a GDL to look at. If you get a TC after completing the GDL, they'll look at that too. Not sure how much focus is put on the GDL to be honest - one US firm that they look for straight Commendations (is that what they're called?), but I've got no idea about that because I've never had to go down that path.
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aliceaquaspirit
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So basically I like English a lot, completely in love with the subject and very good at it.
There are no jobs in English however so here are my options:

Law degree at uni - go straight into law for degree and have a detailed knowledge of it

English degree at uni and then law conversion - get to take an English degree which I love, then do a 3 year law conversion

Any opinions welcome, I need advice!!x
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