Can i do chemistry in A level and get computer engineering degree

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Pranav12345
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I was wondering if i could do an A level in chemistry and get into computer systems engineering or computer science university degree. I was told that Physics was more important which is why i am. Not sure what to pick.My A levels are Maths Computer science Physics or Chemistry (Problem)
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username3434964
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You don't need either as far as I know? Just pick the one you enjoy. The one you need is maths, which you've got.
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Pranav12345
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(Original post by Bill Nye)
You don't need either as far as I know? Just pick the one you enjoy. The one you need is maths, which you've got.
Thanks. Does this apply to all universities?
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username3434964
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(Original post by Pranav12345)
Thanks. Does this apply to all universities?
I'm not 100% sure about computer engineering, but you do not need physics for computer science, you need maths for nearly all unis.
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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(Original post by Bill Nye)
I'm not 100% sure about computer engineering, but you do not need physics for computer science, you need maths for nearly all unis.
He said computer engineering, which is different and definitely requires physics. (Basicly, computer engineering is hardware based, while computer science is more to do with software. You can think of it as the halfway point between computer science and electrical engineering.)
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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Are you sure you mean computer engineering and not computer science? They're different areas of computing and engineering, and I would assume that computer engineering also requires physics as it relies heavily on electricity knowledge, to apply it to things such as board design.
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Sheperd23
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(Original post by ZdYnm8vuNR)
He said computer engineering, which is different and definitely requires physics. (Basicly, computer engineering is hardware based, while computer science is more to do with software. You can think of it as the halfway point between computer science and electrical engineering.)
Do you mind explaining what the differences between the three are?
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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(Original post by Kangaroo17)
Do you mind explaining what the differences between the three are?
In general it goes like this:

Computer science:
Mainly Based on writing software, learning about algorithms, solving problems using discrete math, learning the inner workings of how the computer operates as a whole, including how it accesses the internet, how the OS manages RAM etc. (The one im personally interested in

Computer engineering:
More about designing hardware (the physical aspects of a computer, such as its CPU), perhaps some low-level programming, how to design efficient GPUs etc.

Electrical engineering:
Mainly deals with electricity, electromagnetism and how these phenomena can be used to solve problems and make our lives easier. For example, an electrical engineer is the one who designs the circuits to be used in appliances such as a washing machines, cars and airplanes.

I found this video that will further explain the differences:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDNB8BoV0KU&t
(Keep in mind though, its made for his specific university in the US, which uses a different degree system to the UK)

From the same channel, heres a video of him comparing computer science and computer engineering:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGX_42qSofc&t

After watching those videos, which one sounds better to you?
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vessa
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Computer Science (software, coding, theory and stuff) will only require maths (and maybe further maths at some unis) but most most university courses for Computer Engineering (Building circuits, components and a little bit of coding) is considered part of Electronic Engineering at most universities, which almost *always* requires maths AND physics. If you're desperate to avoid doing physics, some courses will let you get away with having further maths instead, but honestly, physics is more important to have than even computer science, if you want to keep your options open. (Trust me, I've just applied)
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username3434964
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(Original post by ZdYnm8vuNR)
He said computer engineering, which is different and definitely requires physics. (Basicly, computer engineering is hardware based, while computer science is more to do with software. You can think of it as the halfway point between computer science and electrical engineering.)
No he said both.

I have no idea if he means computer engineering computer systems engineering, or what the differences are, but I don't remember needed physics, but I am wrong so...
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