What is the difference between eurochromatin and chromosomes? Watch

debbie394
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What is the difference between eurochromatin and chromosomes?

Couldn't I replace eurochromatin with chromosome (I want to because I have not learnt about eurochromatin so it would not be appropriate):

'During interphase of the cycle, where the cell is not dividing but undergoing a period of growth, the chromatin is in a less compact form known as eurochromatin. '
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OxFossil
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(Original post by esmeralda123)
What is the difference between eurochromatin and chromosomes?

Couldn't I replace eurochromatin with chromosome (I want to because I have not learnt about eurochromatin so it would not be appropriate):

'During interphase of the cycle, where the cell is not dividing but undergoing a period of growth, the chromatin is in a less compact form known as eurochromatin. '
First - it looks like you have misread/mis-typed the term euchromatin (there's no such thing as "eurochromatin")

Euchromatin is not exactly the same as a "chromosome", as follows:

1. DNA is organised into long strings of chromatin - this is the DNA plus various associated proteins.
2. During interphase, the chromatin is quite loosely coiled, so that all you can see when you stain it and look through a microscope is a sort of hazy mess, with some bits staining dark and other parts staining light. You cannot see any chromosomes during interphase, because the chromatin is too loosely arranged to form into those distinctive shapes.
3. Instead, what you see are some stretches of the DNA which are actively being read so as to produce proteins and other transcripts. These parts comprise both the chromatin and some of the other enzymes etc which are being used to transcribe the DNA. The bits of the chromatin thread where this is going on are called euchromatin. You are also seeing other parts of the chromatin string which are not being transcribed and are just sitting there, relaxing. Those bits are called heterochromatin.
4. It is only when the cell enters cell division that the chromatin bunches up tightly and it forms visible chromosomes. After cell division is complete, the chromatin opens up again and the chromosomes "disappear" from view, as the chromatin arranges itself once again into the looser euchromatin and heterochromatin forms.

So if you are not expected to know the term "euchromatin", it might be more correct to talk about the DNA in interphase being arranged simply as strings of chromatin, and arranging itself into visible chromosomes only during division.

Does that make sense?
Last edited by OxFossil; 4 months ago
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Jpw1097
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(Original post by esmeralda123)
What is the difference between eurochromatin and chromosomes?

Couldn't I replace eurochromatin with chromosome (I want to because I have not learnt about eurochromatin so it would not be appropriate):

'During interphase of the cycle, where the cell is not dividing but undergoing a period of growth, the chromatin is in a less compact form known as eurochromatin. '
Cells spend most of their time in interphase. In interphase, the DNA within the nucleus is not tightly packed and tightly coiled into chromosomes, it is a very loose, decondensed form of DNA - this is known as chromatin. During prophase (one of the stages of mitosis), the DNA condenses and becomes tightly packed into structures known as chromosomes. At the end of mitosis (telophase), the DNA decondenses and becomes very loose again - again, this loose structure is chromatin.

There are two types of chromatin - euchromatin and heterochromatin. Euchromatin is more ‘loose’ and less packed than heterochromatin as it undergoes transcription (i.e. the genes are being read to make proteins). Heterochromatin is more tightly packed as the DNA does not undergo much transcription. Since heterochromatin is more tightly packed, when you add a stain and look at the DNA under a microscope, it appears much darker, as opposed to euchromatin which is much lighter.

Hope that helps.
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