SWaha98
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Hi
I want to know which A levels open more doors and/or are the most respected.
Basically which A levels would help me get into any good career?
I had a few options and not sure which ones to go with:
Maths, business and accounting
Maths, economics, accounting
Maths, accounting, biology or chemistry.
Maths, economics, biology or chemistry.

I know they're odd choices. But I want to know what the good A level options are for someone who is still cannot decide on a career path?
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Afterlife?
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Maths bio eco. You have maths a science and a social science
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harry.styles
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Getting into 'any good career' is a fairly broad target! If you want to keep your options open however, doing a selection of 'hard,' non-vocational A levels is a good idea.

Generally speaking, the more people that find a subject difficult the more value it is deemed to have. Maths and the hard sciences (Physics, Chemistry, Biology - usually in that order) are what are considered 'hard' by most people and, subsequently, have a lot of value. To keep the door open to 'any good career' however, it might be wise to include a non hard-science subject that would broaden your skills base. A humanities or social science subject would certainly do this, economics being one example, and this would be useful to many potential careers.

In terms of a future career it is also important to consider aptitude; if you make it to the top in any field you will have a good career and you will maximise your chances of doing so if you pursue a career which aligns with your aptitudes. Thus, selecting A levels in subjects you have an aptitude for is also a good strategy. If you're not sure what you have an aptitude for then think about what you find genuinely interesting - they often align.

In short, a good strategy to meet your goal of getting into any good career would be to choose subjects at the confluence of 1.what subjects are high-value 2.what you have aptitude/interest for 3. what keeps the door open to a variety of possibilities.

My selection would be: Maths, Economics, Chemistry.

Best of luck.
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by SWaha98)
Hi
I want to know which A levels open more doors and/or are the most respected.
Basically which A levels would help me get into any good career?
I had a few options and not sure which ones to go with:
Maths, business and accounting
Maths, economics, accounting
Maths, accounting, biology or chemistry.
Maths, economics, biology or chemistry.

I know they're odd choices. But I want to know what the good A level options are for someone who is still cannot decide on a career path?
Pick the ones that you will enjoy most.
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gay*
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maths chemistry economics
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SWaha98
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Thanks all, I think I'll go with maths, economics and chemistry.
I work full time and will actually be doing these A levels online. I haven't studied for so long so any tips on studying? I am aiming to get an A/A* on all 3 so any advice or tips?
How many hours a week should I study per subject?
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Nihilisticb*tch
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Okay so I'm gonna clear some things up for you.
ANY A level can lead to good prospects and open up lots of doors. Whatever combination you take you will open up doors but it just depends on which doors you want to open. For example, doing maths and 3 sciences would allow you to do basically any science subject and also some non scientific subjects as well. However, if you hate science that won't be a good combination. Also, don't be an accountant. It's very boring and most of them will be replaced by robots by the time you retire lol.
The A levels most respected by universities are the facilitating A levels so these are things such as languages, English lit, sciences, history maths etc. You can find a list online. The recommendation is to take 2 facilitating subject and the third be whatever you want.
The best advice I can give to you is to take the subjects you are most passionate about and want to learn more about. You can be successful with almost any degree or with none.
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mcdonaldkylie
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Maths, economics and chemistry
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
Okay so I'm gonna clear some things up for you.
ANY A level can lead to good prospects and open up lots of doors. Whatever combination you take you will open up doors but it just depends on which doors you want to open. For example, doing maths and 3 sciences would allow you to do basically any science subject and also some non scientific subjects as well. However, if you hate science that won't be a good combination. Also, don't be an accountant. It's very boring and most of them will be replaced by robots by the time you retire lol.
The A levels most respected by universities are the facilitating A levels so these are things such as languages, English lit, sciences, history maths etc. You can find a list online. The recommendation is to take 2 facilitating subject and the third be whatever you want.
The best advice I can give to you is to take the subjects you are most passionate about and want to learn more about. You can be successful with almost any degree or with none.
This facilitating subject is something produced by the Russell Group and isnt correct. The individual universities actually have a preferred subject list which is far wider than the RG list. Sheffield has one as does UCL and Birmingham has one for Law. There are many subjects which universities are equally happy with as well as the so called facilitating subjects. Examples are Economics an Psychology and there are numerous others.
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username3186268
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Maths, economics, chemistry.

It allows you to apply to business and economics (thanks you economics and maths) (accounting doesn’t help anything)
And allows you to apply to chemistry, biology and same Vet+Med courses (thanks to maths and chemistry).

I wish I studied economics instead of biology tbh.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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(Original post by swanseajack1)
This facilitating subject is something produced by the Russell Group and isnt correct. The individual universities actually have a preferred subject list which is far wider than the RG list. Sheffield has one as does UCL and Birmingham has one for Law. There are many subjects which universities are equally happy with as well as the so called facilitating subjects. Examples are Economics an Psychology and there are numerous others.
That is true but the facilitating subjects are a good general guide. My main point is that OP should choose their subjects based on what they enjoy rather than what they think will make them successful
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
That is true but the facilitating subjects are a good general guide. My main point is that OP should choose their subjects based on what they enjoy rather than what they think will make them successful
to be honest there has been dispute about the infomed choices booklet for many years. RG have used it but most of their universities dont seem to follow this. It seems only oxbridge do. If people choose academic subjects they will be fine for nearly all universities including most rg ones.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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(Original post by swanseajack1)
to be honest there has been dispute about the infomed choices booklet for many years. RG have used it but most of their universities dont seem to follow this. It seems only oxbridge do. If people choose academic subjects they will be fine for nearly all universities including most rg ones.
That's probably true. I think you should look at degrees you might want to do an choose the subjects that they require.
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Kilam_Namoan
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Don't do 4 A-levels. Math's, chem and bio is perhaps the most versatile batch of A-levels possible. It opens up most science degrees, all social science degrees, and most art degrees (only the science degree's have specific subject requirements.
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YEezzy
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
Okay so I'm gonna clear some things up for you.
ANY A level can lead to good prospects and open up lots of doors. Whatever combination you take you will open up doors but it just depends on which doors you want to open. For example, doing maths and 3 sciences would allow you to do basically any science subject and also some non scientific subjects as well. However, if you hate science that won't be a good combination. Also, don't be an accountant. It's very boring and most of them will be replaced by robots by the time you retire lol.
The A levels most respected by universities are the facilitating A levels so these are things such as languages, English lit, sciences, history maths etc. You can find a list online. The recommendation is to take 2 facilitating subject and the third be whatever you want.
The best advice I can give to you is to take the subjects you are most passionate about and want to learn more about. You can be successful with almost any degree or with none.
How do you knwo what you are passionate about because I am in this position where I don't know what to decvide, as I like sciences but social sceicen are interesting what shall I do?
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pinkglasscase
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I would advice taking maths, economics and one science. This is because Maths and a Science would open the door to a Medicine, or another sciency degree if you realise you enjoy that throughout your A-Levels. Economics is incredibly useful as it has both elements of business and accounting. For accounting and business degrees, neither of the A Levels are required or especially useful as much of the knowledge is repeated in first year. Besides, getting an A / A* in Economics is much harder, therefore more impressive to universities. It combines essay writing skills as well as the mathematical skills useful for an accounting or business degree.
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returnmigrant
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
The A levels most respected by universities are the facilitating A levels
(Original post by swanseajack1)
to be honest there has been dispute about the infomed choices booklet for many years.

Facilitating Subjects / Informed Choices are long gone. Please read : https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...s-subjects-hit
The RG Unis were never consistent about their attitude to this concept - and it was really only LSE that obsessed about it anyway.

Choose the A level subjects that you are most interested in - this is what will get you the best grades, and that IS what will matter.
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