mangofarmer
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hi, I'm currently in year 12 and considering a law degree at uni. I study Maths, English Lit, Biology and take an EPQ. Do my (mostly STEM) options hinder my study of law at top universities?

Also, is there anything I could do to boost my chances of being accepted into a top law course, such as debating etc?
0
reply
Reality Check
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by carolinebaileyc)
Hi, I'm currently in year 12 and considering a law degree at uni. I study Maths, English Lit, Biology and take an EPQ. Do my (mostly STEM) options hinder my study of law at top universities?

Also, is there anything I could do to boost my chances of being accepted into a top law course, such as debating etc?
This combination of arts and sciences is perfect for law - it's a very successful preparatory course. Plus you've been sensible to do only three A levels and an EPQ, rather than try to do four or more A levels.

You need to be able to talk lucidly and convincingly about your interest in the law from an academic, not vocational point of view and why that leads you to want to study it. Try to read widely - the law reports in the Times on a Thursday are a good starting point.
2
reply
mangofarmer
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by Reality Check)
This combination of arts and sciences is perfect for law - it's a very successful preparatory course. Plus you've been sensible to do only three A levels and an EPQ, rather than try to do four or more A levels.

You need to be able to talk lucidly and convincingly about your interest in the law from an academic, not vocational point of view and why that leads you to want to study it. Try to read widely - the law reports in the Times on a Thursday are a good starting point.
Thank you so much for your advice! I will definitely look at the times. Do you know of any good books I could read to deepen my understanding of law? Also, how can sciences be beneficial to law? Is it due to the methodical approach?
0
reply
Reality Check
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by carolinebaileyc)
Thank you so much for your advice! I will definitely look at the times. Do you know of any good books I could read to deepen my understanding of law? Also, how can sciences be beneficial to law? Is it due to the methodical approach?
There's a good few introductory law books (Lord Denning is a perennial favourite) - have a browse in your local bookshop.

Yes - science shows an ability to assimilate and synthesise a lot of information, an ability to make logical connexions between ideas and to deduce - all very relevant to law. Your arts subjects show your ability to write clearly and concisely - the combination of these is why an arts-science mix is so good.
0
reply
mangofarmer
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by Reality Check)
There's a good few introductory law books (Lord Denning is a perennial favourite) - have a browse in your local bookshop.

Yes - science shows an ability to assimilate and synthesise a lot of information, an ability to make logical connexions between ideas and to deduce - all very relevant to law. Your arts subjects show your ability to write clearly and concisely - the combination of these is why an arts-science mix is so good.
Great stuff, thanks for all of your help!
0
reply
Reality Check
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by carolinebaileyc)
Great stuff, thanks for all of your help!
You're welcome
0
reply
Notoriety
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by Reality Check)
There's a good few introductory law books (Lord Denning is a perennial favourite) - have a browse in your local bookshop.

Yes - science shows an ability to assimilate and synthesise a lot of information, an ability to make logical connexions between ideas and to deduce - all very relevant to law. Your arts subjects show your ability to write clearly and concisely - the combination of these is why an arts-science mix is so good.
Landmarks in the Law is a good intro.

His autobiographies are more interesting from a historical perspective -- going to the Lords when bombs are hitting Parliament.
0
reply
Reality Check
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by Notoriety)
Landmarks in the Law is a good intro.

His autobiographies are more interesting from a historical perspective -- going to the Lords when bombs are hitting Parliament.
Yes, very much so.
0
reply
J Papi
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by carolinebaileyc)
Hi, I'm currently in year 12 and considering a law degree at uni. I study Maths, English Lit, Biology and take an EPQ. Do my (mostly STEM) options hinder my study of law at top universities?

Also, is there anything I could do to boost my chances of being accepted into a top law course, such as debating etc?
It's far too late for you to do anything meaningful in debating. Try MUN/EYP if you're desperate.

They won't care about Biology. It's one course.
0
reply
mangofarmer
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by JohanGRK)
It's far too late for you to do anything meaningful in debating. Try MUN/EYP if you're desperate.

They won't care about Biology. It's one course.
What do you mean by it being too late to do debating?
0
reply
J Papi
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by carolinebaileyc)
What do you mean by it being too late to do debating?
No top university that looks seriously at your P.S. will be impressed by you saying that you once went to a session on public speaking or whatever. Hundreds of applicants will claim something similar. The people who impress are the ones that have serious debating cheevs. And you've left it too late to get to that level of competitive debating. You should try your hand at something at which you can stand out despite not having years of experience.
0
reply
mangofarmer
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by JohanGRK)
No top university that looks seriously at your P.S. will be impressed by you saying that you once went to a session on public speaking or whatever. Hundreds of applicants will claim something similar. The people who impress are the ones that have serious debating cheevs. And you've left it too late to get to that level of competitive debating. You should try your hand at something at which you can stand out despite not having years of experience.
I was actually considering joining the debating society at my sixth form, so this wouldn’t be a one time thing. Also I don’t think it’s fair to say I’ve left it too late, when this is the first opportunity I’ve had to try debating.

Finally, what do you recommend i try doing instead that will look impressive without years of experience?

Thanks
1
reply
J Papi
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by carolinebaileyc)
I was actually considering joining the debating society at my sixth form, so this wouldn’t be a one time thing. Also I don’t think it’s fair to say I’ve left it too late, when this is the first opportunity I’ve had to try debating.

Finally, what do you recommend i try doing instead that will look impressive without years of experience?

Thanks
Again, casually joining the debating society won't make you stand out. It's the equivalent of reading Letters to a Law Student or doing a week's work experience with your local solicitor. Basic-tier CV fodder that they've seen a billion times before.

(It's worth noting that only a handful of universities will be selective enough to care about the P.S. in general, but hey, I get you, those 4000 characters won't fill themselves)

I suggested Model UN and the European Youth Parliament. Alternatively, get some publications that are related to law in a student magazine or something. Start a blog and look into judgments that make the news (great way of showing both legal skills and a genuine interest in legal principles). Go down to the closest Crown Court and note down things that you like about the process and the arguments you hear (be careful not to start commenting on procedure or advocacy - a law degree covers neither of the two). There are plenty of alternatives that will come across as more distinctive.
0
reply
mangofarmer
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#14
(Original post by JohanGRK)
Again, casually joining the debating society won't make you stand out. It's the equivalent of reading Letters to a Law Student or doing a week's work experience with your local solicitor. Basic-tier CV fodder that they've seen a billion times before.

(It's worth noting that only a handful of universities will be selective enough to care about the P.S. in general, but hey, I get you, those 4000 characters won't fill themselves)

I suggested Model UN and the European Youth Parliament. Alternatively, get some publications that are related to law in a student magazine or something. Start a blog and look into judgments that make the news (great way of showing both legal skills and a genuine interest in legal principles). Go down to the closest Crown Court and note down things that you like about the process and the arguments you hear (be careful not to start commenting on procedure or advocacy - a law degree covers neither of the two). There are plenty of alternatives that will come across as more distinctive.
Okay thanks for your advice. What do you study?
0
reply
J Papi
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
(Original post by carolinebaileyc)
Okay thanks for your advice. What do you study?
law
0
reply
mangofarmer
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#16
(Original post by JohanGRK)
law
Cool what uni?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Hertfordshire
    All Subjects Undergraduate
    Sat, 16 Nov '19
  • University of Roehampton
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 16 Nov '19
  • Swansea University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 16 Nov '19

Which party will you be voting for in the General Election?

Conservatives (46)
18.47%
Labour (103)
41.37%
Liberal Democrats (50)
20.08%
Green Party (15)
6.02%
Brexit Party (7)
2.81%
Independent Group for Change (Change UK) (0)
0%
SNP (4)
1.61%
Plaid Cymru (5)
2.01%
Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) (0)
0%
Sinn Fein (0)
0%
SDLP (0)
0%
Ulster Unionist (0)
0%
UKIP (2)
0.8%
Other (2)
0.8%
None (15)
6.02%

Watched Threads

View All