Chemistry vs Physics

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Pranav12345
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#1
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#1
Hi,

I am currently wondering which A level i should pick. Chemistry or Physics.
Can someone please give me a taster of what each is like (i would prefer it if you could mention something else than the people already replied but that isnt necessary THX!) and personally if you have picked both A levels which do you find easier and why.

Thanks
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Pantera Fan Club
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#2
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First year, picked both. Physics is harder, there's much less being extended from GCSE. You need to be on the ball for both on Day 1.
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Pranav12345
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(Original post by Pantera Fan Club)
First year, picked both. Physics is harder, there's much less being extended from GCSE. You need to be on the ball for both on Day 1.
How do you find chemistry and could you please explain what it means less extended from GCSE?
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Nihilisticb*tch
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I have picked both but I'm only in the start of year 12 so idk if I'm qualified to express an opinion.
I think chemistry is harder than physics however we haven't gone very far in physics like we've done only quite easy stuff so far so my opinion might change.
I would not suggest choosing subjects based on which is easier. There are basically no easy a levels and if you are passionate at A subject you are more likely to do well even if it's hard.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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#5
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(Original post by Pranav12345)
How do you find chemistry and could you please explain what it means less extended from GCSE?
A lot of A level stuff follows on from GCSE quite smoothly like it's just going a bit further if that makes sense.
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RadicalCowboy
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I’m in year 13 and still do both. I’m a tad biased since I’ve applied for a chem degree but physics is a lot more challenging, at least personally.

Chem isn’t as maths heavy and the calculations you do are very easy, whilst passing physics without doing a maths a level alongside it would be close to a miracle. The data sheets are quite different so the type of content you have to memorise is very different; all the formulas for physics are given to you alongside constants, and in chem none you’re given none, as you’re essentially just given a periodic table and some organic structures and spectroscopy data values. Practicals are very different too, physics based ones are mostly pendulums or ramps or circuits (all extremely exciting.....) while chem is a lot more involved, heating stuff, using chemicals not given to lower years, using fancier (well just a tad) equipment.

That’s just a few differences but if you have specific questions shoot.
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Guarddyyy
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#7
I'm also in year 13 and I take both (as well as Maths and AS Further Maths).

As mentioned by @RadicalCowboy , chemistry is more knowledge-based than physics (but physics is still VERY knowledge based).

It really depends on what you actually want to study, if it's engineering, astrophysics etc. then take Physics. If you want to study materials, medicine etc. then take Chemistry.

If you would like some taste of content in both the Physics (I do OCR A) and Chemistry (OCR B) course then I can give you examples of questions or topics which you could have a brief look at to see which captures your interest the most.
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zyxwvutsr
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Many of the topics in chemistry follow on from each other and you use much of your knowledge from other chapters to help you throughout the course. I find that this is less the case with physics as the chapters are more separate - for example the section on waves in OCR A is unlikely to help you with your SUVAT equations. In chemistry you also have more of a variety of practicals to carry out however I couldn’t say whI have is better as personally I love both subjects.
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Pantera Fan Club
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#9
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#9
(Original post by Pranav12345)
How do you find chemistry and could you please explain what it means less extended from GCSE?
Chemistry A Level uses mol and titrations and other familiar ideas from GCSE. Physics spends 10 minutes on waves and then an hour on completely new, almost completely unrelated topics and concepts about waves that you've never, ever, heard before.
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Pranav12345
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#10
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#10
(Original post by RadicalCowboy)
I’m in year 13 and still do both. I’m a tad biased since I’ve applied for a chem degree but physics is a lot more challenging, at least personally.

Chem isn’t as maths heavy and the calculations you do are very easy, whilst passing physics without doing a maths a level alongside it would be close to a miracle. The data sheets are quite different so the type of content you have to memorise is very different; all the formulas for physics are given to you alongside constants, and in chem none you’re given none, as you’re essentially just given a periodic table and some organic structures and spectroscopy data values. Practicals are very different too, physics based ones are mostly pendulums or ramps or circuits (all extremely exciting.....) while chem is a lot more involved, heating stuff, using chemicals not given to lower years, using fancier (well just a tad) equipment.

That’s just a few differences but if you have specific questions shoot.
Which of the subjects is easier and more straight forward to learn(i am fine in memorising equations). To get into my degree i only need maths as a requirement for computer systems engineering at university and I quite enjoy chemistry now but not sure how it may turn out in A levels. In your opinion would it be necessary to pick A level physics as im leaning towards picking A Level chemistry for the engineering course mentioned above or could i learn the parts i need from physics in University whilst doing my degree course and go with Chemistry.
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RadicalCowboy
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Pranav12345)
Which of the subjects is easier and more straight forward to learn(i am fine in memorising equations). To get into my degree i only need maths as a requirement for computer systems engineering at university and I quite enjoy chemistry now but not sure how it may turn out in A levels. In your opinion would it be necessary to pick A level physics as im leaning towards picking A Level chemistry for the engineering course mentioned above or could i learn the parts i need from physics in University whilst doing my degree course and go with Chemistry.
Personally I do think chemistry is far more straightforward, physics tends to have some very strange application questions that can be rather confusing. Honestly it depends what kind of engineering you want to go into. Aeronautical would be better suited to physics, so would electrical, but chemical would suit chemistry.
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