Y2_UniMaths
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#1
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I’m doing AS Level AQA Biology, currently on the topic Biological Molecules and I’m wondering whether or not we need to know about cofactors as I can’t find it in the textbook and it’s not in the CGP revision guide either, yet our teacher went through them in lesson. Does anyone know?
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Y2_UniMaths
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Y2_UniMaths
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Anyone?
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Infinite Series
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
I’m doing AS Level AQA Biology, currently on the topic Biological Molecules and I’m wondering whether or not we need to know about cofactors as I can’t find it in the textbook and it’s not in the CGP revision guide either, yet our teacher went through them in lesson. Does anyone know?
You don't need to know about co-factors. I'm in Y13 and I still haven't come across these in all the texts i've read or exam questions
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Y2_UniMaths
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(Original post by Infinite Series)
You don't need to know about co-factors. I'm in Y13 and I still haven't come across these in all the texts i've read or exam questions
Ok thank you. Also, what does the induced fit model explain?
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Infinite Series
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
Ok thank you. Also, what does the induced fit model explain?
The mechanism by which enzyme and substrate come together is called the induced-fit hypothesis.

When the substrate approaches the active site of the enzyme, the shape of the active site then changes tp fit precisely around the substrate - in other words, the substrate induces the active site to change shape. The reaction is catalysed and then products form.
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Y2_UniMaths
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(Original post by Infinite Series)
The mechanism by which enzyme and substrate come together is called the induced-fit hypothesis.

When the substrate approaches the active site of the enzyme, the shape of the active site then changes tp fit precisely around the substrate - in other words, the substrate induces the active site to change shape. The reaction is catalysed and then products form.
Thanks and I understand this but what I meant was what does this explain? For example the lock and key hypothesis explains enzyme specificity which explains the loss of activity when enzymes denature. So what does the induced fit hypothesis explain? Sorry if I’m not explaining this very well
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Infinite Series
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
Thanks and I understand this but what I meant was what does this explain? For example the lock and key hypothesis explains enzyme specificity which explains the loss of activity when enzymes denature. So what does the induced fit hypothesis explain? Sorry if I’m not explaining this very well
I don't know the answer to that, sorry.

Have you done practice questions on this topic?
The closest question i've seen to this: simply asks us to explain what is meant by the 'lock and key' or 'induced fit' model.
Most questions in this topic are easy applications.
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Y2_UniMaths
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(Original post by Infinite Series)
I don't know the answer to that, sorry.

Have you done practice questions on this topic?
The closest question i've seen to this: simply asks us to explain what is meant by the 'lock and key' or 'induced fit' model.
Most questions in this topic are easy applications.
That’s alright I appreciate your time
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
Thanks and I understand this but what I meant was what does this explain? For example the lock and key hypothesis explains enzyme specificity which explains the loss of activity when enzymes denature. So what does the induced fit hypothesis explain? Sorry if I’m not explaining this very well
What are you trying to ask here?
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Y2_UniMaths
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(Original post by Reality Check)
What are you trying to ask here?
I’m not sure how to say it. Perhaps just forget about it?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
I’m not sure how to say it. Perhaps just forget about it?
OK - but if you want to give it a try I'll see if I can answer you
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Y2_UniMaths
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(Original post by Reality Check)
OK - but if you want to give it a try I'll see if I can answer you
I think I’ll be alright but thanks anyways
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Reality Check
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#14
(Original post by Y12_FurtherMaths)
I think I’ll be alright but thanks anyways
You're welcome.
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s666
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#15
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The induced fit model explains how similar shaped molecules (competitive inhibitors) can bind to an enzyme's active site even though they may be slightly larger (for example) than the substrate in the reaction. Hope this helps??
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Y2_UniMaths
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#16
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#16
(Original post by s666)
The induced fit model explains how similar shaped molecules (competitive inhibitors) can bind to an enzyme's active site even though they may be slightly larger (for example) than the substrate in the reaction. Hope this helps??
Bingo TYSM
Last edited by Y1_UniMaths; 3 years ago
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s666
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Hopefully I wont confuse things but i also found that the induced fit model also helps visualise the weakening of substrate bonds and considers the development of a transition state between the substrate and products (which is what reduces activation energy).
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Y2_UniMaths
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#18
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#18
(Original post by s666)
Hopefully I wont confuse things but i also found that the induced fit model also helps visualise the weakening of substrate bonds and considers the development of a transition state between the substrate and products (which is what reduces activation energy).
Little bit confusing but thanks anyways haha
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