coolguy1707
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I am considering taking it for an a level and I just wanted to know what it’s about. If it contains a lot about religion then I don’t really think I’d be interested
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Joe312
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(Original post by coolguy1707)
I am considering taking it for an a level and I just wanted to know what it’s about. If it contains a lot about religion then I don’t really think I’d be interested
1/4 of the course is about God - but more about the arguments related to proving or disproving God's existence rather than the details of religious belief.
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fiorucci
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It depends on what exam board you do but if you're on AQA you will do these topics:

-Epistemology - all about knowledge eg what is knowledge, how do get knowledge, do we have any knowledge?
-Ethics - all about how to be a good person and different ethical theories eg utilitarianism, deontology, virtue ethics, metaethics
-Philosophy of mind - all about the mind and consciousness, relates a little bit to psychology and neuroscience
-Metaphysics of God - does God exist? Is the concept of God coherent?

You don't actually cover any religions during the course, just various arguments around the existence/non-existence of God. The spec does take quite an atheist view though and with it being philosophy obviously all arguments for God are knocked down pretty harshly so don't worry about that.
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gjd800
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(Original post by geximini)
with it being philosophy obviously all arguments for God are knocked down pretty harshly so don't worry about that.
This is such a weird thing to say. There are shedloads of pro philosophers working today defending robust arguments for god, I work with like ten.
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fiorucci
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(Original post by gjd800)
This is such a weird thing to say. There are shedloads of pro philosophers working today defending robust arguments for god, I work with like ten.
I never meant philosophy is anti-God. I was pointing out the nature of philosophy where arguments are constantly questioned and picked apart so the A-level spec involves both sides of the debate. I assumed the OP was concerned that the specification would take a pro-God position. Obviously OP never explicitly stated this but from my experience a lot of students are concerned about philosophy being entirely pro-religion. Hope that clears things up
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gjd800
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(Original post by geximini)
I never meant philosophy is anti-God. I was pointing out the nature of philosophy where arguments are constantly questioned and picked apart so the A-level spec involves both sides of the debate. I assumed the OP was concerned that the specification would take a pro-God position. Obviously OP never explicitly stated this but from my experience a lot of students are concerned about philosophy being entirely pro-religion. Hope that clears things up
Mmm. The initial point is uncharacteristically ambiguous for a philosophy student!

Anyway, yes, quite. The point is less that philosophy knocks down harshly any arguments for god (not necesarily true), and more that philosophy knocks down harshly any bad argument at all.
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fiorucci
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(Original post by gjd800)
Mmm. The initial point is uncharacteristically ambiguous for a philosophy student!

Anyway, yes, quite. The point is less that philosophy knocks down harshly any arguments for god (not necesarily true), and more that philosophy knocks down harshly any bad argument at all.
Yes sorry that is what I initially meant in my first post (I've been bed-bound with flu all day so forgive me for not being too clear, my head isn't completely right atm ). When typing the post I had the design argument, in particular, in mind. The specification goes quite in depth to Hume's pretty brutal response to this argument, which is why I said what I said. Although I am pretty sure the majority (if not all) arguments for the existence of God within the AQA specification are attacked in similar manners, but that isn't to say all arguments in favour of God are attacked quite so well, just the ones on this particular specification.
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Joe312
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(Original post by geximini)
Yes sorry that is what I initially meant in my first post (I've been bed-bound with flu all day so forgive me for not being too clear, my head isn't completely right atm ). When typing the post I had the design argument, in particular, in mind. The specification goes quite in depth to Hume's pretty brutal response to this argument, which is why I said what I said. Although I am pretty sure the majority (if not all) arguments for the existence of God within the AQA specification are attacked in similar manners, but that isn't to say all arguments in favour of God are attacked quite so well, just the ones on this particular specification.
Honestly a lot of Hume's criticisms of the design argument have pretty good counter-arguments. Which do you think is the strongest one?
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