Zoeva123
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I've currently been taking 4 a levels and been finding. The work load manageable. I'm taking maths, Computer science , physics and psychology. I want to go into engineering so psychology isn't really relevant but it's an easier a level. The issue is that I don't enjoy my psychology lessons at all and don't particularly like the people in my class. I've been considering dropping the a level but have been told I should self study the subject and take the a level externally. Just wanted to know if it's possible to get a good grade by self studying psychology and if anyone else has done this what grade they've gotten.

Any help is appreciated x
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saboor 123
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study economics or business instead. more valued than psychology when it comes to Engineering. I self studied economics in 2 weeks and attempted a mock at my centre. I got an A. I contributed only 2 hours per day in those 2 weeks. If I give it more time I can get an A*
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Historynerd101
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I self studied upper sixth psychology due to teacher absence and achieved a very high A*. It is totally possible to self teach psychology and get very good grades, you've just got to dedicate the time to it and just learn the details (I found quizlet was incredibly helpful for psychology)
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Zoeva123
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(Original post by saboor 123)
study economics or business instead. more valued than psychology when it comes to Engineering. I self studied economics in 2 weeks and attempted a mock at my centre. I got an A. I contributed only 2 hours per day in those 2 weeks. If I give it more time I can get an A*
I wish I had chosen something that linked better but everyone was telling me I'd enjoy psychology. I feel like I should just carry on with psychology because I've already gotten a fair bit done in lessons and I have the books and stuff. Does economics require a lot of application or is it mainly just memorising?
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Zoeva123
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(Original post by Historynerd101)
I self studied upper sixth psychology due to teacher absence and achieved a very high A*. It is totally possible to self teach psychology and get very good grades, you've just got to dedicate the time to it and just learn the details (I found quizlet was incredibly helpful for psychology)
Yh I felt like psychology was a lot of memorising which doesn't really require a teacher. Is there a particular way you learnt it like flash cards or mind maps and how did you manage your time because I feel like I'm not going to put as much time into it as it's not a part of college.
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Historynerd101
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(Original post by Zoeva123)
Yh I felt like psychology was a lot of memorising which doesn't really require a teacher. Is there a particular way you learnt it like flash cards or mind maps and how did you manage your time because I feel like I'm not going to put as much time into it as it's not a part of college.

I had extra free periods during the school day because I had no psychology lessons so I always used this extra time for psychology. You have to manage your time by making it a part of your college day. Even if this means dedicating a particular hour to psychology every day such 6-7pm or even spending Saturdays only doing psychology. Try to ensure that you spend the same amount of time on all of your subjects, whether you are taught them or not.

To initially make notes during my free periods, I'd use the course textbook and online resources like Tutor 2 U to type up a word document on each topic. Once I'd understood it and got all the details I needed I sometimes did the questions in the textbook or planned essays. You need to understand the topic before you memorise the details in case a difficult question comes up that needs you to apply your knowledge.

Then to revise it I'd make a quizlet for each of the topics e.g. social influence or memory. I would go through the textbooks and my notes and add any detail I wanted to learn onto quizlet and then using the 'learn' function I'd go through and revise the whole thing. I found creating an essay plan for each topic was incredibly helpful too, especially if I didn't have time to write them all out. I also went through the specification and ranked how well I knew each topic so I spent the most time on the topics I knew the least about. I did occasionally make mindmaps but found quizlet was more helpful for learning lots of details, names and statistics.

One thing to remember is that in my lower sixth psychology, I was not self taught and so had my essays marked for me by a teacher- this meant that by the upper sixth I knew how the technique for longer essay questions. This meant in upper sixth I could self teach the new content but I had already learned the correct essay structure and technique for my 16 mark essays. You'd need to learn the exam technique yourself.

If you really hate your school lessons and can afford it you could always self teach during week and have a tutor once a week for an hour to make sure you understand everything and give you feedback on your essays.

I hope this makes sense!
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Rolls_Reus_0wner
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(Original post by saboor 123)
study economics or business instead. more valued than psychology when it comes to Engineering. I self studied economics in 2 weeks and attempted a mock at my centre. I got an A. I contributed only 2 hours per day in those 2 weeks. If I give it more time I can get an A*
how??
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saboor 123
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(Original post by Rolls_Reus_0wner)
how??
what do you mean how? Go through the spec. In edexcel you have 4 themes for economics B. If you watch economics TV shows then you would knkw more than 70% of the concepts. First week go through the spec and google the concepts. Understabd them and try to apply them in life situations. Next week go through mark schemes and examiner reports. Now try a paper. Voila. A guaranteed. But put in your heart. Thats key.
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Rolls_Reus_0wner
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(Original post by saboor 123)
what do you mean how? Go through the spec. In edexcel you have 4 themes for economics B. If you watch economics TV shows then you would knkw more than 70% of the concepts. First week go through the spec and google the concepts. Understabd them and try to apply them in life situations. Next week go through mark schemes and examiner reports. Now try a paper. Voila. A guaranteed. But put in your heart. Thats key.
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JoeWellr
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I’ll be doing 4 A Levels as well , Further Maths, Maths , CompSci and Physics. Chemistry as AS Level . What do you guys think about the workload of those subjects and how much time to dedicate to get A/A*’s ??
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Zoeva123
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(Original post by JoeWellr)
I’ll be doing 4 A Levels as well , Further Maths, Maths , CompSci and Physics. Chemistry as AS Level . What do you guys think about the workload of those subjects and how much time to dedicate to get A/A*’s ??
It's quite a lot of work especially because you're essentially doing the work for 5 a levels in the first year (because of chem). I've been doing 4 so far and it hasn't been a problem at all. I've been putting in about 2 hours of my own time I to each subject a week and I'm completely on top of it all. Just want to not do psychology because I don't enjoy the lessons.
If you're aiming for A/A* my teachers have recommended 5 hours independent study per subject which is a lot of time considering how many subjects you're taking.
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Zoeva123
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(Original post by Historynerd101)
I had extra free periods during the school day because I had no psychology lessons so I always used this extra time for psychology. You have to manage your time by making it a part of your college day. Even if this means dedicating a particular hour to psychology every day such 6-7pm or even spending Saturdays only doing psychology. Try to ensure that you spend the same amount of time on all of your subjects, whether you are taught them or not.

To initially make notes during my free periods, I'd use the course textbook and online resources like Tutor 2 U to type up a word document on each topic. Once I'd understood it and got all the details I needed I sometimes did the questions in the textbook or planned essays. You need to understand the topic before you memorise the details in case a difficult question comes up that needs you to apply your knowledge.

Then to revise it I'd make a quizlet for each of the topics e.g. social influence or memory. I would go through the textbooks and my notes and add any detail I wanted to learn onto quizlet and then using the 'learn' function I'd go through and revise the whole thing. I found creating an essay plan for each topic was incredibly helpful too, especially if I didn't have time to write them all out. I also went through the specification and ranked how well I knew each topic so I spent the most time on the topics I knew the least about. I did occasionally make mindmaps but found quizlet was more helpful for learning lots of details, names and statistics.

One thing to remember is that in my lower sixth psychology, I was not self taught and so had my essays marked for me by a teacher- this meant that by the upper sixth I knew how the technique for longer essay questions. This meant in upper sixth I could self teach the new content but I had already learned the correct essay structure and technique for my 16 mark essays. You'd need to learn the exam technique yourself.

If you really hate your school lessons and can afford it you could always self teach during week and have a tutor once a week for an hour to make sure you understand everything and give you feedback on your essays.

I hope this makes sense!
Yh I have around 5 hours of free periods in the week and I could dedicate some of that time to psychology. I've heard of quicker but never really tried it myself but definitely will give it a try now. The essay marking was the thing I was most worried about because I wouldn't really know where I was going wrong or how many marks I've gained in each essay. I don't think my teachers would be willing to help because I'm going to drop out of my classes. Is there a particular thing you need to look out for when you're writing an essay. As in is there a technique that would guarantee high marks.
Thanks for your help! x
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JoeWellr
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(Original post by Zoeva123)
It's quite a lot of work especially because you're essentially doing the work for 5 a levels in the first year (because of chem). I've been doing 4 so far and it hasn't been a problem at all. I've been putting in about 2 hours of my own time I to each subject a week and I'm completely on top of it all. Just want to not do psychology because I don't enjoy the lessons.
If you're aiming for A/A* my teachers have recommended 5 hours independent study per subject which is a lot of time considering how many subjects you're taking.
~Hey thanks for responding 😃
I was thinking of doing psychology earlier but my school doesn’t have it so I decided to stick to CompSci.
Since you do CompSci , how is its A Level ?, because I was thinking of self studying the A Level while doing the AS at school and what advice would you give me ??
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Zoeva123
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(Original post by JoeWellr)
~Hey thanks for responding 😃
I was thinking of doing psychology earlier but my school doesn’t have it so I decided to stick to CompSci.
Since you do CompSci , how is its A Level ?, because I was thinking of self studying the A Level while doing the AS at school and what advice would you give me ??
In my opinion psychology is a much easier a level than computer science which is why I began to consider self studying as my lessons aren't really that productive. It's definitely possible to do it yourself if you put enough time into it but a teacher is really helpful for it. I haven't found computer science particularly difficult and I've had a look at the content for the two years and it doesn't seem extremely challenging. If you're set on self studying, as someone else has already said, I would recommend getting a tutor just so they can fill any gaps in your knowledge and answer questions.
Hope I helped. Hard work will get you anywhere you want and only you will truly know if you can do it. Good luck!
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JoeWellr
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(Original post by Zoeva123)
In my opinion psychology is a much easier a level than computer science which is why I began to consider self studying as my lessons aren't really that productive. It's definitely possible to do it yourself if you put enough time into it but a teacher is really helpful for it. I haven't found computer science particularly difficult and I've had a look at the content for the two years and it doesn't seem extremely challenging. If you're set on self studying, as someone else has already said, I would recommend getting a tutor just so they can fill any gaps in your knowledge and answer questions.
Hope I helped. Hard work will get you anywhere you want and only you will truly know if you can do it. Good luck!
Thanks and good luck to you as well and I hope that you smash your A Levels 💪🏻😊
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