ahaq13
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in physics gcse, we were taught that shc is the energy required to raise the temperature of 1g of a substance by 1 degree celsius. in a level biology we are told that water has a high shc but how can it if 1g of water requires little energy to raise the temperature above 1 degree? i assume when we talk about water having a high shc we're talking about large quantities of water but by the definition of shc we should only be talking about 1g of water.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by ahaq13)
in physics gcse, we were taught that shc is the energy required to raise the temperature of 1g of a substance by 1 degree celsius. in a level biology we are told that water has a high shc but how can it if 1g of water requires little energy to raise the temperature above 1 degree? i assume when we talk about water having a high shc we're talking about large quantities of water but by the definition of shc we should only be talking about 1g of water.
Little energy? in comparison to another materials, water has a high energy value to raise about 1 degree. see this table to check.

If you mean the mass with 'high quantities of water', so you are right, the mass is one factor for specific heat capacity. But that seems not to be target-aimed to your question. If I do your question right, you asked about the reason why water has different specific heat cpacity compared with another materials. If it is so, I can tell you that different materials are able to absorb and to store it better or even worse.

If I have not answered your question to your satisfaction, please ask a bit more precise to give me another chance.
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username3947342
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Its 1 kilogram of water not 1 gram.

Grams arent SI units. Youve worded your question weirdly but water has a high specific heat capacity in relation to other substances. There are substances that require less energy to change by 1 kelvin. these will have a lower specific heat capacity. Not quite sure how that confused you.
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Guarddyyy
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(Original post by Afforestation)
Its 1 kilogram of water not 1 gram.

Grams arent SI units. Youve worded your question weirdly but water has a high specific heat capacity in relation to other substances. There are substances that require less energy to change by 1 kelvin. these will have a lower specific heat capacity. Not quite sure how that confused you.
Yes, that's correct.


You were most likely getting confused with chemistry and physics.

Thermal physics definition of specific heat capacity of water is the amount of energy required to raise water of mass 1kg by 1 degree.

For chemistry, you deal with smaller amounts, and its definition is the amount of energy required to raise water of mass 1g by 1 degree.

Physics is 4180J/kg K^-1 and chemistry is 4.18J/g K^-1
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username3947342
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(Original post by Guarddyyy)
Yes, that's correct.

You were most likely getting confused with chemistry and physics.

Thermal physics definition of specific heat capacity of water is the amount of energy required to raise water of mass 1kg by 1 degree.

For chemistry, you deal with smaller amounts, and its definition is the amount of energy required to raise water of mass 1g by 1 degree.

Physics is 4180J/kg K^-1 and chemistry is 4.18J/g K^-1
In chemistry Im still told to work in kg and simply convert. do you know what this guy is actually asking though?
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Guarddyyy
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(Original post by Afforestation)
In chemistry Im still told to work in kg and simply convert. do you know what this guy is actually asking though?
To be brutally honest, not exactly It's not really a question... I think he/she just wants some clarification. It depends what you're actually working with when you are doing chemistry stuff (chemical industry stuff you definitely want to use kg).

May I ask what year you're in as well?
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Kallisto
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(Original post by Guarddyyy)
Yes, that's correct.


You were most likely getting confused with chemistry and physics.

Thermal physics definition of specific heat capacity of water is the amount of energy required to raise water of mass 1kg by 1 degree.

For chemistry, you deal with smaller amounts, and its definition is the amount of energy required to raise water of mass 1g by 1 degree.

Physics is 4180J/kg K^-1 and chemistry is 4.18J/g K^-1
I see, it was about the units, that explains everything. Thank you.

ahaq13 Sometimes, as in physics, the units are calculated in kJ and kg and in biology and chemistry in turn, it is J and g. But the value of the ratio, so c = dQ/dT, is the same, despite of the different dimensions.
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username3947342
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(Original post by Guarddyyy)
To be brutally honest, not exactly It's not really a question... I think he/she just wants some clarification. It depends what you're actually working with when you are doing chemistry stuff (chemical industry stuff you definitely want to use kg).

May I ask what year you're in as well?
S5 in scotland, im 16
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Guarddyyy
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(Original post by Afforestation)
S5 in scotland, im 16
Alright, I'm in year 13 (which is equivalent to S7, so we would've been taught differently).
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