beccabrett
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hi!
I'm currently in year 11 and making my a level choices. I would like to do an English course but I don't know whether to do lit or lang. I only want to do one and I would like to know which one is seen with the highest regards among top universities, such as the Russel group, but also which one is the most interesting/ enjoyable. also, which a level is the most stressful and requires the most work?
many kind regards.
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999tigger
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(Original post by beccabrett)
hi!
I'm currently in year 11 and making my a level choices. I would like to do an English course but I don't know whether to do lit or lang. I only want to do one and I would like to know which one is seen with the highest regards among top universities, such as the Russel group, but also which one is the most interesting/ enjoyable. also, which a level is the most stressful and requires the most work?
many kind regards.
Have you looked at the spec for both, chatted to students, the teacher, checked entrance requirements?

It should be the one you get the best grade in. there is also a spec which is combined lang and lit.

Imo you have to have a talent to do ;ang and you just need to like reading to do lit. Lit is the facilitating subject.
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Ishrah17
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(Original post by beccabrett)
hi!
I'm currently in year 11 and making my a level choices. I would like to do an English course but I don't know whether to do lit or lang. I only want to do one and I would like to know which one is seen with the highest regards among top universities, such as the Russel group, but also which one is the most interesting/ enjoyable. also, which a level is the most stressful and requires the most work?
many kind regards.



Hi! I’m currently doing A levels. So I hope my advice helps.
In GCSE, I’ve studied both English Literature and English Language, and to be honest, in my opinion I feel that English Language is really enjoyable if you are a creative person that loves to analyse and create similar content to all sorts of genres. With English Literature, it’s more of both creative thinking and research. When I mean by research, I mean it includes the majority of all the AO’s (AO1, AO2, AO3, AO4 AO5) and you get to analyse, but it’s equally the same as making you’re own arguments and using creative arguments than creative analysis. In theory, English Literature is basically more practical mind wise while English Language is mkte creative and personal. It’s honeslty up to how you also choose other subjects. If you’re a person wanting to study subjects like law, history, business and economics, then English Literature is the best recommendation. If you want to study subjects like art, philosophy, sport, cooking (basically anything expressive) then English Language is the best option. Hope that helps
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Nitnendo
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I'm doing the combined one. English lit is more interesting to me though
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abdelismail31
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I'm doing the combined course, but I like English Language more.
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beccabrett
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I’m getting 7/8 in lit and Lang so I guess I’m good at both, also my school doesn’t do the combined lit and Lang, language seems interesting but I love reading so ah I’m so confused
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beccabrett
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(Original post by Ishrah17)
Hi! I’m currently doing A levels. So I hope my advice helps.
In GCSE, I’ve studied both English Literature and English Language, and to be honest, in my opinion I feel that English Language is really enjoyable if you are a creative person that loves to analyse and create similar content to all sorts of genres. With English Literature, it’s more of both creative thinking and research. When I mean by research, I mean it includes the majority of all the AO’s (AO1, AO2, AO3, AO4 AO5) and you get to analyse, but it’s equally the same as making you’re own arguments and using creative arguments than creative analysis. In theory, English Literature is basically more practical mind wise while English Language is mkte creative and personal. It’s honeslty up to how you also choose other subjects. If you’re a person wanting to study subjects like law, history, business and economics, then English Literature is the best recommendation. If you want to study subjects like art, philosophy, sport, cooking (basically anything expressive) then English Language is the best option. Hope that helps
Thanks it does! I want to economics, but I also want to do music which is an expressive subject so I don’t know!
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Have you looked at the spec for both, chatted to students, the teacher, checked entrance requirements?

It should be the one you get the best grade in. there is also a spec which is combined lang and lit.

Imo you have to have a talent to do ;ang and you just need to like reading to do lit. Lit is the facilitating subject.
I agree.
The combines one isnt available at all 6th forms/colleges though (i know it wasnt at my old 6th form).
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beccabrett
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(Original post by Emma:-))
I agree.
The combines one isnt available at all 6th forms/colleges though (i know it wasnt at my old 6th form).
The combined course isn’t available at my school
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Ishrah17
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(Original post by beccabrett)Thanks it does! I want to economics, but I also want to do music which is an expressive subject so I don’t know!

Reply: if you do both, then English liteywould be good since you’re both creative and calculative
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thaliaevelyn
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I did both. Work load is about equal. There's more unis that offer literature than language and from what I've seen if unis ever specify that on entry one of your grades must be in a certain subject, they're more likely to say literature than language.
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Tolgarda
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Literature at A-level is about analysing many prescribed poetry and drama texts, along with some unseen prose. Language and literature at GCSE both feed very well into A-level literature, as it is basically the same, except now context plays a far greater role, and the use of interpretations from professional literary critics is also a key element in your essays (AO5). A-level English literature prepares you well if you have any academic pursuits regarding English literature for tertiary education.

English language at A-level is very different from what it is at GCSE. In A-level language, you look at the 'theory behind language' and study the history of the English language, how it has evolved, and how it has become more diverse with different people (e.g. idiolects) within different contexts (e.g. in occupation, gender, etc.). You also learn about a child's language acquisition, and also how they develop their literacy (this spans 0-11 years). Theorists about these different aspects of language are also very significant here for both diversity and change of the language and its acquisition during the first eleven years alive (e.g. David Crystal, Noam Chomsky, etc.). A-level English language delves into linguistics more than anything else, and would be more suited for those with plans to study linguistics further.

The workload is pretty even between the two. Both subjects have a large increase of subject terminology from GCSE, but I'd say that A-level language definitely has more.

I'm taking both at A-level, and I'd recommend one thing: choose wisely.
Last edited by Tolgarda; 10 months ago
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ladybug22
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I am enrolled in English Language and Literature for my major in university, I actually thought English Literature is more common than the combination of both. Though, it is quite enjoyable for you if you are into language and literature, both are a bit stressful at some points. When your grade levelling up, you will get more challenge.
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beccabrett
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
Literature at A-level is about analysing many prescribed poetry and drama texts, along with some unseen prose. Language and literature at GCSE both feed very well into A-level literature, as it is basically the same, except now context plays a far greater role, and the use of interpretations from professional literary critics is also a key element in your essays (AO5). A-level English literature prepares you well if you have any academic pursuits regarding English literature for tertiary education.

English language at A-level is very different from what it is at GCSE. In A-level language, you look at the 'theory behind language', and study the history of the English language, how it has evolved, and how it has become more diverse with different people (e.g. idiolects) within different contexts (e.g. in occupation, gender, etc.). You also learn about a child's language acquisition, and also how they develop their literacy (this spans 0-11 years). Theorists about these different aspects of language are also very significant here for both diversity and change of the language, and its acquisition during the first eleven years alive (e.g. David Crystal, Noam Chomsky, etc.). A-level English language delves into linguistics more than anything else, and would be more suited for those with plans to study linguistics further.

The workload is pretty even between the two. Both subjects have a large increase of subject terminology from GCSE, but I'd say that A-level language definitely has more.

I'm taking both at A-level, and I'd recommend one thing: choose wisely.
Thanks this helps a lot!
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