Humanities degrees are not good value for money: change my mind Watch

e^iπ
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Let's face it, humanities degrees are not value for money unless you go to the likes of Oxbridge.

You are essentially paying £9000 a year for a marking service for essays and to add insult to injury, you have to pay for the books yourself (I know this is the case for every subject but it's more egregious for humanities seeing as the reading makes up the bulk of the "learning)

As for the argument that it gives you transferable skills, so does getting a real job and this will actually earn you money as opposed to costing you money.

It's sad that the culture of forcing our young people into university, means that they feel compelled to go to university, regardless of if the subject will give them a good return on investment.
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PQ
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:yawn:

No one needs to change your mind because no one is forcing you to pay for one.
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Drewski
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Make an original thread.
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PQ
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Isn’t the OP Scottish? :confused:
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e^iπ
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(Original post by PQ)
Isn’t the OP Scottish? :confused:
aye
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PQ
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(Original post by e^iπ)
aye
So you wouldn't have to pay £9k for any degree unless you choose to study in rUK or outside the UK.
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e^iπ
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(Original post by PQ)
So you wouldn't have to pay £9k for any degree unless you choose to study in rUK or outside the UK.
that's true, this thread applies more for the poor English students getting ripped off
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CoolCavy
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Half of my degree is portfolio based and the other half is business reports so not exactly essays, try again.
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e^iπ
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Half of my degree is portfolio based and the other half is business reports so not exactly essays, try again.
Even worse
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by e^iπ)
Even worse
Sure, I'm sure the real companies I worked for on live briefs for my first year thought that. I'm sure the placement I'm undertaking for 3rd year will also think that .
I'm sure that working on life briefs and building up a portfolio to show employers is such a waste of time especially compared to something like theoretical physics which has no real jobs in the actual world.
But I don't need to justify this to you because you're not paying for it I am and I'm fully capable of making my own career decisions thanks :yy:
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PQ
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(Original post by e^iπ)
that's true, this thread applies more for the poor English students getting ripped off
I can't help but think that you're not genuinely concerned for their wellbeing :nope:
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by ltsmith)
Ok but your argument can be applied to math degrees. Infact, you don't even need a human marker to mark math exams. You could program a computer to do so. Look at the field of automated reasoning; with modern advancements in AI, computers are able to generate and verify mathematical proofs using logical axioms.

But you're not paying for the exams. You're paying 9k * 3 for that piece of paper that employers want for professional jobs. Until they stop requiring it, people will go to university.
You're an Edin student right? It's already done there with the open-source STACK system developed Prof Chris Sangwin at the School of Mathematics to generate random questions using computer algebra etc. and have them marked automatically.
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by e^iπ)
Let's face it, humanities degrees are not value for money unless you go to the likes of Oxbridge.

You are essentially paying £9000 a year for a marking service for essays and to add insult to injury, you have to pay for the books yourself (I know this is the case for every subject but it's more egregious for humanities seeing as the reading makes up the bulk of the "learning)

As for the argument that it gives you transferable skills, so does getting a real job and this will actually earn you money as opposed to costing you money.

It's sad that the culture of forcing our young people into university, means that they feel compelled to go to university, regardless of if the subject will give them a good return on investment.
All of my programming exams have been marked by a computer through JUnit tests and Haskell QuickChecks... That's arguably worse than what you've described for English/hums/essay students.
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RedGiant
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Yeah I think that's true for not just humanities degrees. But youngsters would prefer to take the same 'safe' route taken a thousand times to get the same peice of paper.
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PQ
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(Original post by RedGiant)
If you're not good at STEM/maths, what is the alternative though, beside humanities?
Business, law, social sciences, healthcare, creative arts, design, performing arts? There's quite a lot of other subjects that don't fall into either STEM (the M stands for maths) or humanities
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Arkham Funfair
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I've got a humanities degree and have worked for a big 4 consulting company, worked as a journalist and am currently waiting for my visa because I've got a job in Canada :dontknow: My brother has an engineering degree and is in a dead-end job he hates because he has very little motivation. Your degree is a waste of money if you waste your time when getting it. But it's also worth remembering not everyone gets a degree with a job in mind. It's an opportunity for people to indulge in something they love for three years.
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Doones
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(Original post by e^iπ)
Let's face it, humanities degrees are not value for money unless you go to the likes of Oxbridge.

...you have to pay for the books yourself.
https://hbr.org/2017/07/liberal-arts-in-the-data-age

Also, have you heard of libraries?
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e^iπ
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
https://hbr.org/2017/07/liberal-arts-in-the-data-age

Also, have you heard of libraries?
Libraries only have a few copies of the books, there is jo way they can supply an antire class
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e^iπ
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I really wish there were libraries that had sufficient copies of books to supply everyone in a course with their own personal copy, I really wish I lived in same library utopia as you
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Doones
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(Original post by e^iπ)
Libraries only have a few copies of the books, there is jo way they can supply an antire class
University libraries have multiple copies of required course books and many are available as digital editions.
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