I think this is a good way to revise... what do you think,

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ajsar
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My way of revising is too do past papers over and over again mark them and then just revise the topics that I didn’t do well in the test. Is this a good way to revise? I’ve heard that people have gotten a level 9 in maths by doing this but they said this wasn’t enough in a level. I’m a gcse student btw who’s doing foundation. However I have one concern about this. If I have a question I do wrong in the past paper how will I know [email protected] topic it is linked too if it is not obvious?
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LivvyBunny
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That's sounds like a fantastic idea! Just ask your maths teacher or form tutor and im sure they would be more than happy to help. Or you could enter in the question into BBC bitesize and that would help you figure out the topic.
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ajsar
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(Original post by LivvyBunny)
That's sounds like a fantastic idea! Just ask your maths teacher or form tutor and im sure they would be more than happy to help. Or you could enter in the question into BBC bitesize and that would help you figure out the topic.
Wait wait, can you teach me how to type it in to bite size could you give me the link please?
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LivvyBunny
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-well just type the question into Google
-( let's say it's a ratio wordy problem that you didn't know or understand it was on about ratios )
-normally the first website suggested is BBC bitesize. ( don't bother using Wikipedia or anything like that; you won't learn)
- click on BBC bitesize and you can select to do a test on the topic or you can do revision.
- bitesize will help you understand the topic and if it was ratios for example, it would give you practice questions based on ratios.
Quite often past paper answers are available online if you are specific enough in the search engine. If you can find papers, you will be able to find mark schemes - this should help learn topics more easily too!
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S.H.Rahman
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(Original post by ajsar)
My way of revising is too do past papers over and over again mark them and then just revise the topics that I didn’t do well in the test. Is this a good way to revise? I’ve heard that people have gotten a level 9 in maths by doing this but they said this wasn’t enough in a level. I’m a gcse student btw who’s doing foundation. However I have one concern about this. If I have a question I do wrong in the past paper how will I know [email protected] topic it is linked too if it is not obvious?
Recieved an A* in A-level Maths and Further Maths and the way I revised was by going through all the worked example for the module and doing completing the mixed exercise for that chapter and then repeating this for all chapters to ensure I knew all the content.

After this, I'd go do as many of the recent exam papers as I could. The papers that have come out most recently have tend to be hardest.

I've heard of people using your method but my only problem with that is examiners are starting to ask more obscure questions that is in the syllabus but has not been asked in very much at all meaning it may lead to gaps in your knowledge.

Wish you all the best,

-S
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Nihilisticb*tch
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That sounds like a very good way to revise. I've never seen a GCSE question where the topic isn't obvious.
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mqb2766
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The general rule is to make sure you have a reasonable idea of the syllabus and you can do the key parts of each topic in the syllabus, then do exam papers to find areas of weaknesses, focus on exam style questions and get your exam timing right. If you're unsure of the type of exam question you're answering, I suspect you need to revisit the basic syllabus and review the tools associated with it and can answer the basic questions. For the syllabus:
1) Corbett 5 a day and/or revision cards and BBC bitesize
2) http://m4ths.com/uploads/3/2/7/4/327..._free_copy.pdf
3) More importantly, the cgp revision (or ... guide associated with your exam board / the class course book.
If you don't recognise its a ratio, algebra, .. .question, I'd go back and go over these syllabus and workbooks carefully. Drfrostmaths can give you a group of questions about a specific topic, .... I'd not be too concerned about which resource I used, just pick one or two (revision and worksheets) and go over it/them fully. If you did one or two topics a week (a reasonable commitment), it would still take ~3 months to complete this.

Focussing on exam papers is really important, but you need to get the basics in place first and know the syllabus.
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ajsar
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(Original post by mqb2766)
The general rule is to make sure you have a reasonable idea of the syllabus and you can do the key parts of each topic in the syllabus, then do exam papers to find areas of weaknesses, focus on exam style questions and get your exam timing right. If you're unsure of the type of exam question you're answering, I suspect you need to revisit the basic syllabus and review the tools associated with it and can answer the basic questions. For the syllabus:
1) Corbett 5 a day and/or revision cards and BBC bitesize
2) http://m4ths.com/uploads/3/2/7/4/327..._free_copy.pdf
3) More importantly, the cgp revision (or ... guide associated with your exam board / the class course book.
If you don't recognise its a ratio, algebra, .. .question, I'd go back and go over these syllabus and workbooks carefully. Drfrostmaths can give you a group of questions about a specific topic, .... I'd not be too concerned about which resource I used, just pick one or two (revision and worksheets) and go over it/them fully. If you did one or two topics a week (a reasonable commitment), it would still take ~3 months to complete this.

Focussing on exam papers is really important, but you need to get the basics in place first and know the syllabus.

Thank you guys so much do you guys know anyone that has done my way and gotten really good gcse marks?
(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
That sounds like a very good way to revise. I've never seen a GCSE question where the topic isn't obvious.

(Original post by S.H.Rahman)
Recieved an A* in A-level Maths and Further Maths and the way I revised was by going through all the worked example for the module and doing completing the mixed exercise for that chapter and then repeating this for all chapters to ensure I knew all the content.

After this, I'd go do as many of the recent exam papers as I could. The papers that have come out most recently have tend to be hardest.

I've heard of people using your method but my only problem with that is examiners are starting to ask more obscure questions that is in the syllabus but has not been asked in very much at all meaning it may lead to gaps in your knowledge.

Wish you all the best,

-S
(Original post by LivvyBunny)
-well just type the question into Google
-( let's say it's a ratio wordy problem that you didn't know or understand it was on about ratios )
-normally the first website suggested is BBC bitesize. ( don't bother using Wikipedia or anything like that; you won't learn)
- click on BBC bitesize and you can select to do a test on the topic or you can do revision.
- bitesize will help you understand the topic and if it was ratios for example, it would give you practice questions based on ratios.
Quite often past paper answers are available online if you are specific enough in the search engine. If you can find papers, you will be able to find mark schemes - this should help learn topics more easily too!
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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Yes it's a good idea, but don't just "tick off" the questions you've done well on. The sections you perform poorly on will need the most attention, but you should still revisit your strong areas just to make sure the information and methods are still in your head . Good luck!
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Nihilisticb*tch
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I got good GCSE results (5 9s, 58s) by using a similar sort of method. I first learnt all of the content by reading the revision guides and then I did past papers and went over the stuff I didn't know.
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username2941720
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If you're studying maths, it's also a good idea to learn methods and equations, since most maths questions all have a general rule or method to solve it (i.e. you have to factorise a quadratic, solve it, and THEN you draw it on a graph), which means if you nail those methods, you'll find it much easier to figure out where you went wrong and learn from your mistakes. But, to be honest, your method does seem pretty great! If you're still worried about your maths grade, there are loads of great maths help tutorials and websites, such as Mathswatch. I used those a lot for my gcse, and they were pretty useful. (Check out my most recent thread to see the grades I got in year 10)
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ajsar
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(Original post by nstar12)
If you're studying maths, it's also a good idea to learn methods and equations, since most maths questions all have a general rule or method to solve it (i.e. you have to factorise a quadratic, solve it, and THEN you draw it on a graph), which means if you nail those methods, you'll find it much easier to figure out where you went wrong and learn from your mistakes. But, to be honest, your method does seem pretty great! If you're still worried about your maths grade, there are loads of great maths help tutorials and websites, such as Mathswatch. I used those a lot for my gcse, and they were pretty useful. (Check out my most recent thread to see the grades I got in year 10)
Ok I’ll check it thanks!
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