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Kalabamboo
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Hi, I was wondering what they mean by "disadvantage: selection of strains not using CCR5 receptor for entry into
the host cells" i don't understand the disadvantage they have given - could someone please help me understand this? Thanks
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s666
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I think (?)it means that some strains of the virus do not use the CCR5 receptor to enter host (body) cells so therefore using a CCR5 inhibitor will not prevent them causing disease as they enter cells in other ways
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Kalabamboo
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(Original post by s666)
I think (?)it means that some strains of the virus do not use the CCR5 receptor to enter host (body) cells so therefore using a CCR5 inhibitor will not prevent them causing disease as they enter cells in other ways
Ah thanks a lot! Really appreciate your reply.

Was also wondering what are the "clinical trials of CCR5 inhibitors". So I don't understand what they are trialing and th epurpose
Could you please kindly let me know whenever possible?
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bobby147
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(Original post by s666)
I think (?)it means that some strains of the virus do not use the CCR5 receptor to enter host (body) cells so therefore using a CCR5 inhibitor will not prevent them causing disease as they enter cells in other ways
I second this.To enter a T helper cell,the virus has to bind to CD4 and a co receptor,usually CCR5.However ,the virus can go through a mutation that means it can bind to CD4 and not need to use another co receptor such as CCR5.There is also HIV strains that use a co receptor different from CCR5,such as CXCR4.
Experiments have been done with CCR5 antagonists where the HIV still used CCR5,binding to it at higher affinities or binding to a different part of it.
Having the CCR5 mutation makes you more resistant but doesnt make you immune.
Hope this helps !
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bobby147
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(Original post by Kalabamboo)
Ah thanks a lot! Really appreciate your reply.

Was also wondering what are the "clinical trials of CCR5 inhibitors". So I don't understand what they are trialing and th epurpose
Could you please kindly let me know whenever possible?
They are developing drugs that block CCR5,so the virus wont be able to bind to CCR5,which the main strain of HIV needs as well as binding to CD4 to enter the T cell.
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s666
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So the clinical trials mean they have tested the inhibitors on infected patients to test their effectiveness on real people -this is where they find things such as side effects, the inhibitors not working on certain strains of the virus etc. Basically finding out their clinical effectiveness so they can develop drugs for wider use in treatment
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Kalabamboo
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(Original post by bobby147)
I second this.To enter a T helper cell,the virus has to bind to CD4 and a co receptor,usually CCR5.However ,the virus can go through a mutation that means it can bind to CD4 and not need to use another co receptor such as CCR5.There is also HIV strains that use a co receptor different from CCR5,such as CXCR4.
Experiments have been done with CCR5 antagonists where the HIV still used CCR5,binding to it at higher affinities or binding to a different part of it.
Having the CCR5 mutation makes you more resistant but doesnt make you immune.
Hope this helps !
Thanks a lot!! Also out of interest, what is a coreceptor for? Does it have the same purpose/function in all cells and where would it be positioned? - so like right next to other typical cell receptors? What is so unique about the coreceptor which puts it apart from other cell receptors?

Btw really reall appreciate your help!
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Kalabamboo
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(Original post by s666)
So the clinical trials mean they have tested the inhibitors on infected patients to test their effectiveness on real people -this is where they find things such as side effects, the inhibitors not working on certain strains of the virus etc. Basically finding out their clinical effectiveness so they can develop drugs for wider use in treatment
Thanks so much again
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bobby147
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(Original post by Kalabamboo)
Thanks a lot!! Also out of interest, what is a coreceptor for? Does it have the same purpose/function in all cells and where would it be positioned? - so like right next to other typical cell receptors? What is so unique about the coreceptor which puts it apart from other cell receptors?

Btw really reall appreciate your help!
For normal T cell function,chemicals called chemokines bind to the CCR5 receptor,and it what guides the T cells and other immune cells to a site of infection .

However ,when it comes to HIV infection,you can call it a co-receptor,because HIV needs to bind to two receptors to enter the helper T cell.

One of them must be CD4 ,and other is normally but not for all HIV strains CCR5.

So for HIV entry,CD4 is the primary receptor and CCR5 is the co receptor since it is needed in addition to CD4 to enter the helper T cell.

Anytime you need an additional receptor in addition to another receptor to facilitate a process,you can call it a co receptor.
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Kalabamboo
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(Original post by bobby147)
For normal T cell function,chemicals called chemokines bind to the CCR5 receptor,and it what guides the T cells and other immune cells to a site of infection .

However ,when it comes to HIV infection,you can call it a co-receptor,because HIV needs to bind to two receptors to enter the helper T cell.

One of them must be CD4 ,and other is normally but not for all HIV strains CCR5.

So for HIV entry,CD4 is the primary receptor and CCR5 is the co receptor since it is needed in addition to CD4 to enter the helper T cell.

Anytime you need an additional receptor in addition to another receptor to facilitate a process,you can call it a co receptor.
Ah brilliant!! Thank you so so much for clearing this up for me! Really appreciate your time!
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