Becoming a surgeon without doing dissection at med school Watch

MedGreig
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#1
Hi All,

I'm a pre-clinical student at a medical school which doesn't offer dissection, but students can see prosection specimens (pre dissected) once a term to consolidate anatomy. I may want to become a surgeon but I'm not set on it. I'm particularly frustrated at the anatomy teaching as I rejected schools which dissect for reasons which made sense to me at the time.

Could a clinical med student or doctor on here offer their opinion on how or if this could influence my chances of becoming a successful surgeon?

Thank you!!
0
reply
Hype en Ecosse
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 months ago
#2
Surgeons graduate from all medical schools across the country and the act of med student dissection is extremely dissimilar from surgical skills - so it won't affect your chances at all.

Good things to get involved in if you're absolutely set on being a surgeon:
Your uni surgical soc
Your uni anatomy/clinical anatomy soc
Surgical conferences
Theatre time on placements
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
3
reply
plrodham1
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 months ago
#3
(Original post by MedGreig)
Hi All,

I'm a pre-clinical student at a medical school which doesn't offer dissection, but students can see prosection specimens (pre dissected) once a term to consolidate anatomy. I may want to become a surgeon but I'm not set on it. I'm particularly frustrated at the anatomy teaching as I rejected schools which dissect for reasons which made sense to me at the time.

Could a clinical med student or doctor on here offer their opinion on how or if this could influence my chances of becoming a successful surgeon?

Thank you!!
It'll have no influence
0
reply
purplefrog
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 months ago
#4
As others have said - this will have no influence with regards to entering core surgical training. Having been to a medical which does full cadaveric dissection, it can be a mixed bag and probably is overhyped with prosections being underhyped. Often there's large groups allocated to a cadaver and obviously only one or two people can be actively dissecting at any one time. Initially (when it's all new and exciting, everybody wants to do it) and when there's lots of keen beans, you'll rotate between who dissects while others watch. Then, often, there is usually just a small handful who are super keen on dissection and they become the regular ones in the group to do the dissecting while others watch / chat. Dissecting a cadaver is really different to actually making incisions on a live person so I wouldn't say that gives you any advantage whatsoever. Additionally, this is usually done in pre-clinical (or early years in integrated courses) and it's years before you are a junior in an OR. There's also a tendency for many cadaveric specimens to be suboptimal for learning because amateurs have done the dissecting or that there's been limited time or the cadaver itself may not be the best example - this is where prosection can be markedly advantageous, where somebody has generally spent a lot more time and precision in constructing the specimen with thoughts as to how best to demonstrate the anatomy.

Regardless, you'll need to learn your anatomy to pass your exams. Some medical schools require you to know your gross anatomy in a lot more depth than others, which may just focus on emphasising clinically important points. This may pay off later on with MRCS exams (should anybody some how remember that level of mindnumbing detail). But generally, if you are considering surgery, the best thing to do would be to learn it in depth, including know relations, blood supplies/innervation +/- lymphatic drainage (lolz).

You could then consider intercalating in a BSc like surgical sciences or anatomy or developmental biology. Some of these BScs may have a module or two on dissection or 'advanced dissection' where you painstakingly prepare a specimen.

There's also likely to be plenty of opportunities to do anatomy / radiology / surgical themed SSCs in your pre-clinical and clinical years too which can further give you a boost in knoweldge / enthusiasm for the topic. Many of which does give you further exposure to anatomical specimens.

But going back to your original qn, not doing dissection will have little impact on you being a surgeon.
3
reply
MedGreig
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 months ago
#5
(Original post by purplefrog)
As others have said - this will have no influence with regards to entering core surgical training. Having been to a medical which does full cadaveric dissection, it can be a mixed bag and probably is overhyped with prosections being underhyped. Often there's large groups allocated to a cadaver and obviously only one or two people can be actively dissecting at any one time. Initially (when it's all new and exciting, everybody wants to do it) and when there's lots of keen beans, you'll rotate between who dissects while others watch. Then, often, there is usually just a small handful who are super keen on dissection and they become the regular ones in the group to do the dissecting while others watch / chat. Dissecting a cadaver is really different to actually making incisions on a live person so I wouldn't say that gives you any advantage whatsoever. Additionally, this is usually done in pre-clinical (or early years in integrated courses) and it's years before you are a junior in an OR. There's also a tendency for many cadaveric specimens to be suboptimal for learning because amateurs have done the dissecting or that there's been limited time or the cadaver itself may not be the best example - this is where prosection can be markedly advantageous, where somebody has generally spent a lot more time and precision in constructing the specimen with thoughts as to how best to demonstrate the anatomy.

Regardless, you'll need to learn your anatomy to pass your exams. Some medical schools require you to know your gross anatomy in a lot more depth than others, which may just focus on emphasising clinically important points. This may pay off later on with MRCS exams (should anybody some how remember that level of mindnumbing detail). But generally, if you are considering surgery, the best thing to do would be to learn it in depth, including know relations, blood supplies/innervation +/- lymphatic drainage (lolz).

You could then consider intercalating in a BSc like surgical sciences or anatomy or developmental biology. Some of these BScs may have a module or two on dissection or 'advanced dissection' where you painstakingly prepare a specimen.

There's also likely to be plenty of opportunities to do anatomy / radiology / surgical themed SSCs in your pre-clinical and clinical years too which can further give you a boost in knoweldge / enthusiasm for the topic. Many of which does give you further exposure to anatomical specimens.

But going back to your original qn, not doing dissection will have little impact on you being a surgeon.
Thank you so much that's put my mind at ease a bit more! The intercalated degree is a good idea, and one that I'll try and act on. Of course I'll learn my anatomy as well as I can too. Thank you!!
0
reply
nexttime
  • TSR Support Team
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 months ago
#6
(Original post by MedGreig)
Hi All,

I'm a pre-clinical student at a medical school which doesn't offer dissection, but students can see prosection specimens (pre dissected) once a term to consolidate anatomy. I may want to become a surgeon but I'm not set on it. I'm particularly frustrated at the anatomy teaching as I rejected schools which dissect for reasons which made sense to me at the time.

Could a clinical med student or doctor on here offer their opinion on how or if this could influence my chances of becoming a successful surgeon?

Thank you!!
The med school whose graduates have the highest pass rate in surgical exams, doesn't do dissection. In fact they barely do any anatomy at all.

Its not important. Some excellent advice regarding what is important above.
Last edited by nexttime; 4 months ago
0
reply
Chief Wiggum
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 months ago
#7
I don't think it would make any difference tbh.

I suppose if your anatomy course is less detailed, then you just may need to do more specific anatomy revision for the MRCS exams.
0
reply
MonteCristo
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 months ago
#8
I was anxious about this at medical school but the others are right - it doesn't matter. Dissection is over-rated anyway as lots of time is spent watching someone else peel away fascia whereas prosections have usually been prepared to demonstrate the most important features of the specimen. Even if your basic anatomy education is poor (few medical schools do this well), there is plenty of time to re-learn everything as you progress through core surgical training and postgraduate exams.
1
reply
Becca-Sarah
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 months ago
#9
I'm a CST2, only had prosection-based teaching in first year of uni and no further anatomy teaching from that point til graduation. Passed MRCS A & B on first attempts with the aid of Aclands videos.

Our deanery runs cadaveric based courses twice a year for us to revise anatomy (with prosections) and practice procedures, which is pretty useful, but tbh most learning is from seeing it in real life in theatre. Operating on cadavers is nothing like operating on live people.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Edge Hill University
    Undergraduate and Postgraduate - Campus Tour Undergraduate
    Fri, 22 Mar '19
  • Birmingham City University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 23 Mar '19
  • University of Bolton
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 23 Mar '19

Where do you need more help?

Which Uni should I go to? (89)
16.39%
How successful will I become if I take my planned subjects? (56)
10.31%
How happy will I be if I take this career? (97)
17.86%
How do I achieve my dream Uni placement? (82)
15.1%
What should I study to achieve my dream career? (54)
9.94%
How can I be the best version of myself? (165)
30.39%

Watched Threads

View All