nikitatan
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My title was "How did anatomical illustration influence the history of medicine?"

I planned on creating a sketchbook which I would split into different eras (Greek, Egyptian, Chinese Dynasty, Renaissance, 20th century) where I would explore various scientists at the time whose drawings have allowed theories and discoveries to be made (e.g. Hippocrates and the 4 humours, Chinese acupuncture methods, Da Vinci's work on corpse dissection and identifying organs/muscles).

I wanted to combine lots of notes alongside my own illustrations and paintings in the style of whichever period I was studying, to see through the eyes of those scientists, then produce an oil painting on canvas of the anatomy of a human body (like half muscle and skin, and half bones and organ, showing detailed nerves, etc.) to summarise and apply all the new knowledge of anatomy I have gained through studying these different scientists' art.

However, my EPQ supervisor has advised I 'extend' my title as she thinks I will not be finding out anything new. My project may be too narrative since I will just be reiterating information already available.

I agree with her, but now I am completely lost on where to go from here. She suggested I create a booklet advising present day medical students on how drawings can help their own research but I honestly really wanted to paint something huge as an end artefact just to fully emphasise that art and science can be related and beneficial to one another, as well as show off both my practical/analytical and creative side at once.

Currently, I am thinking of the title 'How does anatomical illustration benefit the past, present and future of medicine?' so I can conclude my sketchbook with ideas and research on 3d digital models and surgical robot designs from the modern age, while still keeping (just shortening) the initial idea of a timeline.

Should I be more broad in my research, such as 'How can art influence science?' / 'How can art influence modern-day medical research?'

I'm not exactly sure what my supervisor meant by 'extend'. Please help me come up with a better, modified structure for my project without changing everything as I am already behind and really need to start.

If you could even explain the purpose/goal of an EPQ, that would be helpful for me to refer to. Does AQA basically want me to create a hypothesis or some sort of argument that I have to answer with my own opinion?
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nikitatan
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#2
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
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My title was "How did anatomical illustration influence the history of medicine?"

I planned on creating a sketchbook which I would split into different eras (Greek, Egyptian, Chinese Dynasty, Renaissance, 20th century) where I would explore various scientists at the time whose drawings have allowed theories and discoveries to be made (e.g. Hippocrates and the 4 humours, Chinese acupuncture methods, Da Vinci's work on corpse dissection and identifying organs/muscles).

I wanted to combine lots of notes alongside my own illustrations and paintings in the style of whichever period I was studying, to see through the eyes of those scientists, then produce an oil painting on canvas of the anatomy of a human body (like half muscle and skin, and half bones and organ, showing detailed nerves, etc.) to summarise and apply all the new knowledge of anatomy I have gained through studying these different scientists' art.

However, my EPQ supervisor has advised I 'extend' my title as she thinks I will not be finding out anything new. My project may be too narrative since I will just be reiterating information already available.

I agree with her, but now I am completely lost on where to go from here. Currently, I am thinking of the title 'How does anatomical illustration benefit the past, present and future of medicine?' so I can conclude my sketchbook with ideas and research on 3d digital models and surgical robot designs from the modern age, while still keeping (just shortening) the initial idea of a timeline.

Should I be more broad in my research, such as 'How can art influence science?' / 'How can art influence modern-day medical research?'

If you could even explain the purpose/goal of an EPQ, that would be helpful for me to refer to. Does AQA basically want me to create a hypothesis or some sort of argument that I have to answer with my own opinion?
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