helpmepls:(
Badges: 7
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
So I can’t decide whether I want to study classics or Ancient History, I have offers from both courses at different unis with Manchester being for Classics, and Warwick for Ancient History, I know that they are extremely similar, I just need to know from people who study either of the two at any university and if you could just describe it for me ? For example if I take classics will I miss out on the more historical learning? Or if I take Ancient History will I miss out on the literary texts? If you study either please let me know !
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
If you take Classics you'll be studying classical languages. In the process of this, you'll look at literary, cultural, historical texts and resources in that language. It's likely up to you to choose which direction you focus on (although initially you'll probably have some exposure to all of them), but the overall focus is on the languages typically (although the university in question may lean towards one direction or another for research, which will likely influence what options are available).

For Ancient History, you'll just be looking at the historical and perhaps cultural content in translation. It's unlikely you'll do much with the literary work (in translation or otherwise, unless you took some outside option) in an Ancient History course, although you may have the opportunity to develop one of the classical languages in the usual structure of the course.

This is in general though; the specific degree programmes noted may vary of course. Manchester has a Classics & Ancient History route in the Classics degree, where you do one language and the corresponding history of that culture. St Andrews, in common with other Scottish universities, allows you to start initially with more breadth and potentially combine your subject with another. It's likely you will be able to start studying the classical languages in the Ancient History course there, and you can combine Ancient History with Classics (or either of the individual languages, or Classical Civilisation, i.e. classical literature and culture in translation).

NB I am not a student of either university or subject, this was all available on the course webpages.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 3 years ago
0
reply
helpmepls:(
Badges: 7
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by artful_lounger)
If you take Classics you'll be studying classical languages. In the process of this, you'll look at literary, cultural, historical texts and resources in that language. It's likely up to you to choose which direction you focus on (although initially you'll probably have some exposure to all of them), but the overall focus is on the languages typically (although the university in question may lean towards one direction or another for research, which will likely influence what options are available).

For Ancient History, you'll just be looking at the historical and perhaps cultural content in translation. It's unlikely you'll do much with the literary work (in translation or otherwise, unless you took some outside option) in an Ancient History course, although you may have the opportunity to develop one of the classical languages in the usual structure of the course. This is in general though; the specific degree programmes noted may vary of course...
Hi !
Thanks for the speedy reply, I feel like Classics would provide a fuller immersion in the classical world other than ancient history, of course, I have looked at specific modules for each iys just v. hard to come up with a decision, but thank you !
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
(Original post by helpmepls:()
Hi !
Thanks for the speedy reply, I feel like Classics would provide a fuller immersion in the classical world other than ancient history, of course, I have looked at specific modules for each iys just v. hard to come up with a decision, but thank you !
I mean it depends on what you want to do, but my impression was if you want to go into academia in Ancient History (or classical literature, or classical philosophy) the language(s) are kind of a must. So, it's probably better to pick an option that will let you take up language alongside if that is something which may be of interest. Otherwise, it probably doesn't matter, but honestly by the looks of it, both options give you as much leeway to go into either side as you like.

The St Andrews option will likely allow you to take up Classics/Latin/Greek as a joint subject, and almost certainly to at least start out in the languages, and you have more "room" to make changes between the different courses over the 4 year programme. Manchester as noted has the choice of taking more Ancient History content. You may as well just put both of them as your firm/insurance, in order of preference
0
reply
OmnomnOmnigul
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by artful_lounger)
I mean it depends on what you want to do, but my impression was if you want to go into academia in Ancient History (or classical literature, or classical philosophy) the language(s) are kind of a must. So, it's probably better to pick an option that will let you take up language alongside if that is something which may be of interest. Otherwise, it probably doesn't matter, but honestly by the looks of it, both options give you as much leeway to go into either side as you like.

The St Andrews option will likely allow you to take up Classics/Latin/Greek as a joint subject, and almost certainly to at least start out in the languages, and you have more "room" to make changes between the different courses over the 4 year programme. Manchester as noted has the choice of taking more Ancient History content. You may as well just put both of them as your firm/insurance, in order of preference
Late responding to this one, but it might help others.

Just piggy-backing on this .. I've applied for Ancient History, and from my own research regarding each university's course, I've found that a lot of Ancient History courses now require you take an ancient language, or otherwise very strongly recommend that you do. I haven't come across one that doesn't at least offer the option.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How did your AQA A-level Physics Paper 1 exam go?

Great! Feeling positive (115)
29.64%
It went fairly well (185)
47.68%
It didn't go too well (60)
15.46%
TERRIBLE! (28)
7.22%

Watched Threads

View All