Charge with insulators and conductors. Watch

lewis.h
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Are electrons only transferred from an electrical insulator to conductor, or can electrons transfer from conductor to an insulator, as charge (which could potentially be positive) builds up at insulators so is it possible for electrons to transfer from conductors to insulators with this in mind ?

(OCR SPECIFICATION - P3)
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LukeT333
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(Original post by lewis.h)
Are electrons only transferred from an electrical insulator to conductor, or can electrons transfer from conductor to an insulator, as charge (which could potentially be positive) builds up at insulators so is it possible for electrons to transfer from conductors to insulators with this in mind ?

(OCR SPECIFICATION - P3)
Yes, it depends on the charge (which one has more electrons than the other):

An example for you:
If you have a negatively charged insulator rod and it touched a metal ball (conductor), electrons will move to the conductor because there was excess electrons on the insulator, and these electrons would keep transferring until the electrons between the metal and conductor reach equilibrium. Oppositely, If the insulator had a positive charge instead of a negative charge (not enough electrons) the electrons will move from the conductor to the insulator.

Hope this helps
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lewis.h
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Hi Luke,Surely the electrons would pass straight to the earth rather than “building up” on the conductor, which your answer suggests in a way ? Thanks a lot anyway,Lewis. 😀
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LukeT333
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(Original post by lewis.h)
Hi Luke,Surely the electrons would pass straight to the earth rather than “building up” on the conductor, which your answer suggests in a way ? Thanks a lot anyway,Lewis. 😀
It (the electrons) only goes to earth (or an earthed conductor) if there's no other place to go. Here the electrons go where there's a positive charge because there's a lack of electrons in the positively charged insulator.
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