When to start revising for a level exams? Watch

Ccyxxx
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When should you start to go over AS/first year content?
And how did you structure your revision?
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_mialouise01
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Now, AS is not like GCSES, you need constant revision and recap to be successful in exams.
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JackMac2904
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Yesterday.
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somebrick
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(Original post by JackMac2904)
Yesterday.
What are u doing/ want to do at uni?
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JackMac2904
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(Original post by somebrick)
What are u doing/ want to do at uni?
I'm on a gap year but I studied maths, further maths, computer science and physics at A level in which I achieved A*A*A*C respectively (I underperformed in physics for a multitude of reasons, I guess the main reason is my teachers monotone voice droning on sent me to sleep most of the time :laugh:)
Take it from me, you need to be revising as early as possible to get top grades.

I'm applying to read mathematics at Oxford, Imperial College London, University College London, Warwick (Place recieved) and York (Place recieved).
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somebrick
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(Original post by JackMac2904)
I'm on a gap year but I studied maths, further maths, computer science and physics at A level in which I achieved A*A*A*C respectively (I underperformed in physics for a multitude of reasons, I guess the main reason is my teachers monotone voice droning on sent me to sleep most of the time :laugh:)
Take it from me, you need to be revising as early as possible to get top grades.

I'm applying to read mathematics at Oxford, Imperial College London, University College London, Warwick (Place recieved) and York (Place recieved).
Ah nice, I’m thinking of computer science with maths or medicine. Not sure yet. What would you recommend, currently doing: maths bio chem and furthermaths. Considering changing fm for physics.
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JackMac2904
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(Original post by somebrick)
Ah nice, I’m thinking of computer science with maths or medicine. Not sure yet. What would you recommend, currently doing: maths bio chem and furthermaths. Considering changing fm for physics.
Very different degrees. All that really matters is that you enjoy the course and it enables you to do what you want to do after you graduate. When are you applying for uni?
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somebrick
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(Original post by JackMac2904)
Very different degrees. All that really matters is that you enjoy the course and it enables you to do what you want to do after you graduate. When are you applying for uni?
Next year. Got a good background in terms of GCSEs, so aiming for oxbridge.
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JackMac2904
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(Original post by somebrick)
Next year. Got a good background in terms of GCSEs, so aiming for oxbridge.
In that case, you will want to get your application sorted before or during summer with perhaps just a couple modifcations in the new academic year. The deadine for Oxbridge and for Medicine is the 15th of October, it seems like ages away come September but it hits you like a brick.
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laurakyna
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What I did was set up an Excel spreadsheet for each subject, had a row for each chapter in the book (as this matched the specification) and had columns going across for how many subtopics are in the chapter, how many I had completed notes on, how many I had completed revision cards/or some form of active recall material for it, and then I had several columns for dates. The date columns were designed to ensure I covered the flashcards for each sub topic in time.

The methods I used were stolen from ali abdaal's YouTube videos, he just graduated medicine from Cambridge uni and has some very good resources on evidence based learning.

Basically you need to have a way of tracking everything that's simple and easy to use, so that you will actually use it! And can easily see what the next topic to do is. I'd probably aim to have all revision material for As completed by end of Xmas holidays and everything for A2 completed asap in Feb/march so that during Jan/Feb you can revise As, then during march/April you can revise A2.

During classes they'll probably be setting you a million past papers too. Have a spreadsheet that tracks those. Eg columns for paper 1, paper 2 etc, rows for the years. Use it to make sure any papers that school doesn't set, you've completed by may, and then redo any crap ones or the most recent/hard ones inithe day or two before the exam.

I attempted all of the above but started too late- only seriously working hard from Easter and I only scraped my grades I needed (A*AA) by a couple of marks. So it really works, but it would have been more comfy if I'd started the as stuff at Xmas as I've suggested to you, I started in Feb because I was an idiot. Scraping grades is not fun...
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Maths&physics
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(Original post by Ccyxxx)
When should you start to go over AS/first year content?
And how did you structure your revision?
now

the structure should suit you
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Ccyxxx
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(Original post by laurakyna)
What I did was set up an Excel spreadsheet for each subject, had a row for each chapter in the book (as this matched the specification) and had columns going across for how many subtopics are in the chapter, how many I had completed notes on, how many I had completed revision cards/or some form of active recall material for it, and then I had several columns for dates. The date columns were designed to ensure I covered the flashcards for each sub topic in time.

The methods I used were stolen from ali abdaal's YouTube videos, he just graduated medicine from Cambridge uni and has some very good resources on evidence based learning.

Basically you need to have a way of tracking everything that's simple and easy to use, so that you will actually use it! And can easily see what the next topic to do is. I'd probably aim to have all revision material for As completed by end of Xmas holidays and everything for A2 completed asap in Feb/march so that during Jan/Feb you can revise As, then during march/April you can revise A2.

During classes they'll probably be setting you a million past papers too. Have a spreadsheet that tracks those. Eg columns for paper 1, paper 2 etc, rows for the years. Use it to make sure any papers that school doesn't set, you've completed by may, and then redo any crap ones or the most recent/hard ones inithe day or two before the exam.

I attempted all of the above but started too late- only seriously working hard from Easter and I only scraped my grades I needed (A*AA) by a couple of marks. So it really works, but it would have been more comfy if I'd started the as stuff at Xmas as I've suggested to you, I started in Feb because I was an idiot. Scraping grades is not fun...
thats a really good idea and really helpful. Thankyou so much!
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wastedcuriosity
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I've started revising now - there's so much content, ugh! It should be constant revision throughout the year and solidifying knowledge as you learn it, so just rewriting notes after class and perhaps talking about the lessons with peers afterwards.

Good luck.
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laurakyna
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(Original post by Ccyxxx)
thats a really good idea and really helpful. Thankyou so much!
You might need to play around with whatever structure that works for you, but just have a way of tracking *everything* not just the stuff you want to revise (as it's often the stuff you hate that you actually struggle with) and set yourself time 5 or 6 days a week when you have to do some. Even an hour Monday - Friday now spent on your own notes/creating revision aids etc, on top of your homework, well help you in the long run.

Also make sure you have either a designated "day off" or as I did and have a couple of afternoons off and a couple of evenings, but different days, so I did a 7 day week but averaged about 30 hours of proper study (including lessons but not including time procrastinating or distracted).

Maintain a healthy work life balance from day 1 to the exams and you'll get more decent work done than if you cram and burn out, plus you'll feel much more relaxed.

Good luck!
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Ccyxxx
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(Original post by wastedcuriosity)
I've started revising now - there's so much content, ugh! It should be constant revision throughout the year and solidifying knowledge as you learn it, so just rewriting notes after class and perhaps talking about the lessons with peers afterwards.

Good luck.
Yes im already going over content but its so much to think il have to go over AS stuff too
when are you thinking of going over the first year content?
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Ccyxxx
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(Original post by laurakyna)
You might need to play around with whatever structure that works for you, but just have a way of tracking *everything* not just the stuff you want to revise (as it's often the stuff you hate that you actually struggle with) and set yourself time 5 or 6 days a week when you have to do some. Even an hour Monday - Friday now spent on your own notes/creating revision aids etc, on top of your homework, well help you in the long run.

Also make sure you have either a designated "day off" or as I did and have a couple of afternoons off and a couple of evenings, but different days, so I did a 7 day week but averaged about 30 hours of proper study (including lessons but not including time procrastinating or distracted).

Maintain a healthy work life balance from day 1 to the exams and you'll get more decent work done than if you cram and burn out, plus you'll feel much more relaxed.

Good luck!
yes ! tysm for your advice
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Abdurrahman0
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your advice is solid! For anyone else looking for my personal experience on revision strategies after hitting a brick wall read on.. But the jist of revision is basically the same as the fantastic advice from laurakyna This is structured into
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