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How can we encourage men to talk about mental health? watch

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    This week it was international men's day. Whatever you think about it (and please don't get into a debate in this thread) men's mental health is an issue that needs talking about. Suicide is the biggest killer of men under 50 and that's huge.

    So, mental health services and other factors aside, how do you think we can encourage men to talk about their mental health? There's been several campaigns on it but it's too early to see any difference yet. In general it probably needs a culture shift which can take generations, but is there anything you think we can do to speed this up? Maybe sites like TSR could even be part of the answer as there's the element of anonymity, and slowly it could become more normal in real life. This is all speculation though of course. What do we think?
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    Read the other day that feminism stops boys from seeking help in class. So they either get it (by themselves) or they won't ever. Nice one feminists.
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    (Original post by hello_shawn)
    Read the other day that feminism stops boys from seeking help in class. So they either get it (by themselves) or they won't ever. Nice one feminists.
    What feminism exactly is it that's meant to stop them, and why specifically in class?
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    I think if people were more accepting of the fact that men don't need to 'act strong', 'show a tough exterior' there wouldn't be a problem.

    If people changed their views and accepted that mental health doesn't make a person any weaker, maybe we'd see men open up a bit more.

    On a whole though, I think most men are just more closed than females. Generalisation, I know. Idk if it's anything to do with the way they're brought up, how society views them or just the way they are in general.
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    I'm not sure there is anything that can be done. It took me a long time to seek help but there are still things that I feel ashamed of and don't feel comfortable discussing and I don't know why. It doesn't matter how many times I'm told it's OK to talk, it doesn't make it any easier really.

    I suppose there just needs to be places to go and support out there for men if they choose to get help but I don't know how you can get more men to feel comfortable discussing their MH. It's a difficult one.
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    In my own personal circumstances I would say that people need to acknowledge that there are a variety of reasons why men and people in general suffer mental health issues instead of just saying that it happens for one reason.
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    (Original post by SoulfulTwist)
    I think if people were more accepting of the fact that men don't need to 'act strong', 'show a tough exterior' there wouldn't be a problem.

    If people changed their views and accepted that mental health doesn't make a person any weaker, maybe we'd see men open up a bit more.

    On a whole though, I think most men are just more closed than females. Generalisation, I know. Idk if it's anything to do with the way they're brought up, how society views them or just the way they are in general.
    This is a huge thing, and I think probably the main one. There is maybe an element of it being how they are though too as you say. It's not completely an environmental thing I don't think. But that's not to say we can't still make a difference to it.


    (Original post by Pachuco)
    I'm not sure there is anything that can be done. It took me a long time to seek help but there are still things that I feel ashamed of and don't feel comfortable discussing and I don't know why. It doesn't matter how many times I'm told it's OK to talk, it doesn't make it any easier really.

    I suppose there just needs to be places to go and support out there for men if they choose to get help but I don't know how you can get more men to feel comfortable discussing their MH. It's a difficult one.
    I can appreciate that :/ you're right though, people need to know where they can get help if they want it and that's okay. It's the same with women too to an extent. But reactions can be quite different to men traditionally ('man up' etc) so it's even more important there.
    (Original post by dtin)
    In my own personal circumstances I would say that people need to acknowledge that there are a variety of reasons why men and people in general suffer mental health issues instead of just saying that it happens for one reason.
    This is a good one! For everyone. Mental illness can affect anyone and for a whole variety of reasons, or for apparently no reason at all. Just because someone hadn't had a bereavement say doesn't mean they can't be depressed, and even if they have it doesn't just go away after a set period anyway. Everyone- and everyone's brain- is different.
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    (Original post by furryface12)
    This is a huge thing, and I think probably the main one. There is maybe an element of it being how they are though too as you say. It's not completely an environmental thing I don't think. But that's not to say we can't still make a difference to it.



    I can appreciate that :/ you're right though, people need to know where they can get help if they want it and that's okay. It's the same with women too to an extent. But reactions can be quite different to men traditionally ('man up' etc) so it's even more important there.

    This is a good one! For everyone. Mental illness can affect anyone and for a whole variety of reasons, or for apparently no reason at all. Just because someone hadn't had a bereavement say doesn't mean they can't be depressed, and even if they have it doesn't just go away after a set period anyway. Everyone- and everyone's brain- is different.
    And how can that difference come about would then be the question.
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    first of all discussion of mental health is a cultural thing. many people say it's a "white" thing. I hear coloured people/poc/bame, whatever you wanna call them now, taking pride in that mental health is a white thing, from their famous comedians to local comedians to casual convo among themselves: "depression is just weakness, bipolar is just crazy, multiple personality is the devil in them, adhd is just a bad ass kid", etc lol. It's not a sex thing until it stops becoming a race thing.

    "Discussion" of mental health means societal acknowledgement. Sex is too broad, race and culture is more specific and therefore a better way to dissect and hack stereotypes if you want "change," since men and women are from these races and cultures. Most people don't identify as "man" and "woman," they identify as "white, black, Irish, English, Nigerian, Jamaican, Pakistani, Christian, Muslim" no matter what, so you'll have to get them to take mental health seriously before men in general can. That's why no one has answered the thread. It's too broad and really makes no sense.

    *And by saying this, I don't actually think these cultures need to induct mental health into their doctrines. They can believe what they want, as I know old school Christians in every race who also have a simple take on mental and behavioural disorders more than a scientific medicinal one, and I'll tend to agree.
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    When it comes to reducing mental health issues/suicide society needs to analyse ALL the factors that can lead to these issues and give people a practical solution about how to get out of that situation. Not just for men but for people in general.
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    its like trying to get girls into maths and computing, impossible
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    Hi furryface12 ,
    I am currently undertaking a dissertation at Sheffield Hallam University surrounding the factors that cause more men to commit suicide than women. The research into it has been both interesting and sad. Like dtin mentioned previously, there is no set answer as to why men struggle to talk about their mental health more than women, as every person is different. However, until societies attitude towards male emotions changes, we will continue to see men struggle. For example, the phrase "man up" is still used in everyday language, which has many negative connotations, implying that men are meant to be tough and strong and not show any emotion. Due to this, men supress their feelings and find it difficult to talk about them with anyone, particularly friends and family. Research has shown that women find it easier to talk to their friends about how they are feeling and show emotions. There are many charities now being created to support male mental health specifically and trying to end the stigma around mental health. Some good examples of this are the charity CALM (Campaign Against Living Miserably), who offer support to men and challenges the culture that stops men from seeking help. Due to their work, the UK's first suicide prevention minister was introduced this year, which aims to accelerate suicide prevention work to help reduce suicide rates.
    https://www.thecalmzone.net/
    Remember, it is okay to not be okay, and nobody will judge you for seeking help. It is good to talk and there are many people you can talk to including friends, family and charities such as CALM and The Samaritans, who are there every single day to support you.
    Best wishes,
    Emma
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    I suspect things will eventually change, but not in the current situation. You may see talk about the subject on the BBC news for example, but where are the protests, and where are the places to approach? To an extent, I'd like to have someone to approach for my mental health, as friends wise I am doing awfully right now, but the places I've found have felt like to be aimed more at women and girls. Maybe I'm being ignorant towards society, but the lack of people tackiling the minor issue is apparent.
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    (Original post by hallamstudents)
    Hi furryface12 ,
    I am currently undertaking a dissertation at Sheffield Hallam University surrounding the factors that cause more men to commit suicide than women. The research into it has been both interesting and sad. Like dtin mentioned previously, there is no set answer as to why men struggle to talk about their mental health more than women, as every person is different. However, until societies attitude towards male emotions changes, we will continue to see men struggle. For example, the phrase "man up" is still used in everyday language, which has many negative connotations, implying that men are meant to be tough and strong and not show any emotion. Due to this, men supress their feelings and find it difficult to talk about them with anyone, particularly friends and family. Research has shown that women find it easier to talk to their friends about how they are feeling and show emotions. There are many charities now being created to support male mental health specifically and trying to end the stigma around mental health. Some good examples of this are the charity CALM (Campaign Against Living Miserably), who offer support to men and challenges the culture that stops men from seeking help. Due to their work, the UK's first suicide prevention minister was introduced this year, which aims to accelerate suicide prevention work to help reduce suicide rates.
    https://www.thecalmzone.net/
    Remember, it is okay to not be okay, and nobody will judge you for seeking help. It is good to talk and there are many people you can talk to including friends, family and charities such as CALM and The Samaritans, who are there every single day to support you.
    Best wishes,
    Emma
    Thank you so much for this! That sounds like a great dissertation, good luck with it

    (Original post by RS15047)
    I suspect things will eventually change, but not in the current situation. You may see talk about the subject on the BBC news for example, but where are the protests, and where are the places to approach? To an extent, I'd like to have someone to approach for my mental health, as friends wise I am doing awfully right now, but the places I've found have felt like to be aimed more at women and girls. Maybe I'm being ignorant towards society, but the lack of people tackiling the minor issue is apparent.
    Yeah, I definitely agree :/ although protest-wise it's not so much something that can be changed by anyone specific as it just needing to be everyone. Sorry you're struggling at the minute though. Have you seen the mental health support society on here? That can be a good place to start and less scary than talking to someone in real life, not as good as a professional obviously but friendly and a listening ear (read the OP first though for rules). Have a look at the sheffield hallam post above too. Hope things improve for you a bit soon!
 
 
 
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