An Inspector Calls Watch

Fifty345
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Where in an Inspector Calls is Mr Birling shown as a dislikeable character?
Last edited by Fifty345; 1 month ago
0
reply
bean101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
Right from the start and basically throughout the whole thing, pay close attention to his reactions to when he finds out about Eva’s death and how he cares more about his reputation and the knighthood he was destined for and also his reactions to any new information that the inspector brings to them.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
Last edited by bean101; 1 month ago
0
reply
Fifty345
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by bean101)
Right from the start and basically throughout the whole thing, pay close attention to his reactions to whenh he finds out about Eva’s death and how he cares more about his reputation and the knighthood he was destined for and also his reactions to any new information that the inspector brings to them.
Thanks. How is this making him a dislikable character?
0
reply
bean101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by Fifty345)
Thanks. How is this making him a dislikable character?
Like I said, he seems more concerned about his reputation than the fact that he has played a role in the suicide of a young woman. He comes across as insensitive and even maybe inhumane and at the end he hasn’t seemed to learn his lesson.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
Fbari_27
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by Fifty345)
Where in an Inspector Calls is Mr Birling shown as a dislikeable character?
Throughout the play tbh, but in the beginning when he’s being pompous when he said the titanic won’t sink, it shows he thinks he knows everything, however it did sink later.

He’s also getting his daughter married to Gerald for getting a title and increasing his bussiness, he’s selfish.

Acts rude to inspector when he first arrives, claiming he knows people and has connections.

He fired Eva Smith because she wanted a pay rise, shows he’s selfish.

When he thinks everything is ok after finding out the inspector wasn’t real. But then worries when another phone call comes. Shows how shallow he is.

He is a capitalist.

Still wants Sheila to marry Gerald even after finding out he cheated on her.

This is all I have.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
pemzy
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
Take a look at his speech where he's speaking to Eric and Gerald he mentions "the way people write these days, they'd think men have to look after each other like bees in a hive" or something along those lines. It expresses his capitalist views, unlike the inspector who's a socialist (act 1)
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
Fifty345
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by bean101)
Like I said, he seems more concerned about his reputation than the fact that he has played a role in the suicide of a young woman. He comes across as insensitive and even maybe inhumane and at the end he hasn’t seemed to learn his lesson.
Could i mention about how mr birling fires eva smith? Would this show he is a dislikeable character?
0
reply
Sinnoh
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by Fifty345)
Could i mention about how mr birling fires eva smith? Would this show he is a dislikeable character?
Yes, given how the whole narrative is intended to engender (haven't used that word since year 11) sympathy for Eva.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
3
reply
bean101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by Fifty345)
Could i mention about how mr birling fires eva smith? Would this show he is a dislikeable character?
Yes it could show that he is more concerned about the amount of money his business makes and less concerned about how his workers are being treated. This treatment ultimately played a part in Eva’s suicide and he seems even more dislikeable because he doesn’t take responsibility for his actions. (“Still I cant accept any responsibility”)
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
Fifty345
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by bean101)
Yes it could show that he is more concerned about the amount of money his business makes and less concerned about how his workers are being treated. This treatment ultimately played a part in Eva’s suicide and he seems even more dislikeable because he doesn’t take responsibility for his actions. (“Still I cant accept any responsibility”)
for my essay, i have to explore a moment in the play where birling is shown as a dislikebable chacter. But what ONE moment in the play can i write a lot about?
0
reply
bean101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by Fifty345)
for my essay, i have to explore a moment in the play where birling is shown as a dislikebable chacter. But what ONE moment in the play can i write a lot about?
I’d definitely say when the inspector confronts Birling about his role in Eva’s suicide and how Birling seems to defend his actions and not accept responsibility.

Here’s some quotes to help you create some points from this part of the play:
“Still, I cant accept any responsibility. If we were all responsible for everything that happened to everybody we’d had anything to do with, it would be very awkward wouldn’t it?”
“It’s my duty to keep labour costs down”
He says to Eric “it’s about time you learnt to face a few responsibilities” (shows irony)
“I’ve told you all I know - and it doesn’t seem to me very important”
Sheila says to Birling “But these girls aren’t cheap labour - they’re people”
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
bean101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
You could also write the essay about the inspectors monologue towards the end of the play and Birling’s reaction to it and how he hasn’t learnt his lesson.

Again some quotes to help:
“We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other ... if men will not learn that lesson, then they will be taught it in fire and blood and anguish.” This quote is from the inspectors monologue, it doesn’t really tell much about Birling but could be used to put the situation into some context.
“You’re the one I blame for this.” Birling to Eric, shows irresponsibility.
“I was almost certain for a knighthood in the next Honours List” shows Birling cares more about his reputation.
Sheila to Birling “you’re beginning all over again to pretend that nothing much has happened-“ and he interrupts with “Nothing much has happened!” Shows that he has not learnt his lesson.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
Fifty345
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#13
(Original post by bean101)
I’d definitely say when the inspector confronts Birling about his role in Eva’s suicide and how Birling seems to defend his actions and not accept responsibility.

Here’s some quotes to help you create some points from this part of the play:
“Still, I cant accept any responsibility. If we were all responsible for everything that happened to everybody we’d had anything to do with, it would be very awkward wouldn’t it?”
“It’s my duty to keep labour costs down”
He says to Eric “it’s about time you learnt to face a few responsibilities” (shows irony)
“I’ve told you all I know - and it doesn’t seem to me very important”
Sheila says to Birling “But these girls aren’t cheap labour - they’re people”
hi thanks a lot. If the the question is asking to explore a moment, can i still mention other section of the play at the same time?
0
reply
KawaiiArtist
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 month ago
#14
(Original post by Fifty345)
hi thanks a lot. If the the question is asking to explore a moment, can i still mention other section of the play at the same time?
You should be able to link to them as long as you don't make that the focus of your essay
0
reply
Fifty345
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#15
(Original post by KawaiiArtist)
You should be able to link to them as long as you don't make that the focus of your essay
thanks and how could i mention the way its written or the punctuation with this quote:
Still, I can't accept any responsibility. If we were all responsible for everything that happened to everybody we'd had anything to do with, it would be very awkward, wouldn't it?
0
reply
KawaiiArtist
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 month ago
#16
(Original post by Fifty345)
thanks and how could i mention the way its written or the punctuation with this quote:
Still, I can't accept any responsibility. If we were all responsible for everything that happened to everybody we'd had anything to do with, it would be very awkward, wouldn't it?
"Still." - Excusing himself.
"I"=Personal pronoun. Selfish. Self centered.
"If we were all...": Pronoun 'we'. Trying to enforce his ideas onto everyone.
His need to assert himself is emphasised by how he repeats himself, dismissing other people's words, and “wouldn't it” makes his own statements seem obvious, matter of fact, that there is no other opinion.
The commas suggest that certain parts of his speech are afterthoughts that he's adding in to affirm his ideas.
Contradicts the Inspectors message: “Public men, Mr Birling, have their responsibilities as well as their privileges.” "We are members of one body"
1
reply
bean101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 month ago
#17
(Original post by KawaiiArtist)
"Still." - Excusing himself.
"I"=Personal pronoun. Selfish. Self centered.
"If we were all...": Pronoun 'we'. Trying to enforce his ideas onto everyone.
His need to assert himself is emphasised by how he repeats himself, dismissing other people's words, and “wouldn't it” makes his own statements seem obvious, matter of fact, that there is no other opinion.
The commas suggest that certain parts of his speech are afterthoughts that he's adding in to affirm his ideas.
Contradicts the Inspectors message: “Public men, Mr Birling, have their responsibilities as well as their privileges.” "We are members of one body"
Really good points!! ^

Just adding on also, the rhetorical question at the end suggests that Birling wants everyone to agree with him so he doesn’t look like he’s the only one in the wrong (sort of taking away the responsibility from only himself in a way).
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
1
reply
Fifty345
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#18
(Original post by KawaiiArtist)
"Still." - Excusing himself.
"I"=Personal pronoun. Selfish. Self centered.
"If we were all...": Pronoun 'we'. Trying to enforce his ideas onto everyone.
His need to assert himself is emphasised by how he repeats himself, dismissing other people's words, and “wouldn't it” makes his own statements seem obvious, matter of fact, that there is no other opinion.
The commas suggest that certain parts of his speech are afterthoughts that he's adding in to affirm his ideas.
Contradicts the Inspectors message: “Public men, Mr Birling, have their responsibilities as well as their privileges.” "We are members of one body"
thank you so much
0
reply
Fifty345
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#19
th

(Original post by bean101)
Really good points!! ^

Just adding on also, the rhetorical question at the end suggests that Birling wants everyone to agree with him so he doesn’t look like he’s the only one in the wrong (sort of taking away the responsibility from only himself in a way).
thank you so much!
1
reply
Fifty345
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#20
(Original post by KawaiiArtist)
"Still." - Excusing himself.
"I"=Personal pronoun. Selfish. Self centered.
"If we were all...": Pronoun 'we'. Trying to enforce his ideas onto everyone.
His need to assert himself is emphasised by how he repeats himself, dismissing other people's words, and “wouldn't it” makes his own statements seem obvious, matter of fact, that there is no other opinion.
The commas suggest that certain parts of his speech are afterthoughts that he's adding in to affirm his ideas.
Contradicts the Inspectors message: “Public men, Mr Birling, have their responsibilities as well as their privileges.” "We are members of one body"
sorry to be a pain but for the quote "i was almost certain for a knighthood in the next honours list- " how can i elaboate on the language and how it is written to expand my answer.

also eric replies, "laughing - oh for God's sake
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    All Departments Open 13:00-17:00. Find out more about our diverse range of subject areas and career progression in the Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences, Medicine & Health Sciences, and the Sciences. Postgraduate
    Wed, 30 Jan '19
  • Solent University
    Careers in maritime Undergraduate
    Sat, 2 Feb '19
  • Sheffield Hallam University
    City and Collegiate Campus Undergraduate
    Sun, 3 Feb '19

Brexit: Given the chance now, would you vote leave or remain?

Remain (555)
80.43%
Leave (135)
19.57%

Watched Threads

View All