Are social influencers the new celebrity endorsers? Watch

Poll: Are social influencers the new celebrity endorsers?
Yes (456)
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No (183)
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Liverpool Hope University Guest Lecturer
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There has been a rise in the use and daily interactions with social media in the past 20 years. New 'celebrities have risen out of moderate obscurity. For a good example of this, we can look at 'Zoella', a beauty vlogger who has shot to fame in just under nine years. The impact of her popularity was demonstrated when she released her first book in 2014. The book was the fastest selling book of that year and broke the record for the highest first weeks sales for a debut author.

With the rise of these social celebrities over the last decade or so, are we now being marketed to in different ways? Are social influencers become the new celebrity endorsers?

________________________________ ________________________________ __________________________

Dr Clay Grandsen is a Lecturer of Marketing who teaches across all levels, from undergraduate to postgraduate. His PhD was in the area of customer delight in the hospitality sector. In addition to Dr. Gransden's academic expertise, he also has over 10 years’ experience working in the Hospitality and Marketing sector. His main area of focus is now on consumer behaviour, focusing specifically on fans and purchase behaviour.
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chelseadagg3r
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#2
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Yeah, I really think it's very similar. We're now seeing these influencers become like celebrities in their own right, but because they begin with things like product reviews and other similar content before they get sponsored or endorsed to do so I think it gives social media users a bit more faith in what they have to say
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ThomH97
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#3
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(Original post by chelseadagg3r)
Yeah, I really think it's very similar. We're now seeing these influencers become like celebrities in their own right, but because they begin with things like product reviews and other similar content before they get sponsored or endorsed to do so I think it gives social media users a bit more faith in what they have to say
Yeah, I think they are more credible since you can see the before, during and after over a long period of time. Perhaps they may also be selling their advice in the end, but at least they do actually have to use the products they endorse. Much better than say, picking someone who's got good skin already and claiming some make up they're using for the first time is due the credit. A video made by someone who just likes sharing and helping is also much more credible than a photo designed and photoshopped by a company worth millions and just want your money.
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chelseadagg3r
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(Original post by ThomH97)
Yeah, I think they are more credible since you can see the before, during and after over a long period of time. Perhaps they may also be selling their advice in the end, but at least they do actually have to use the products they endorse. Much better than say, picking someone who's got good skin already and claiming some make up they're using for the first time is due the credit. A video made by someone who just likes sharing and helping is also much more credible than a photo designed and photoshopped by a company worth millions and just want your money.
Yeah, I definitely agree. They're more relatable, because in a lot of cases they come from the same place as us rather than being essentially born into fame because of famous family etc as well
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Rainbow Bright
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(Original post by ThomH97)
Yeah, I think they are more credible since you can see the before, during and after over a long period of time. Perhaps they may also be selling their advice in the end, but at least they do actually have to use the products they endorse. Much better than say, picking someone who's got good skin already and claiming some make up they're using for the first time is due the credit. A video made by someone who just likes sharing and helping is also much more credible than a photo designed and photoshopped by a company worth millions and just want your money.
With some of the accounts I follow - what they say really makes me feel something, I trust them because a lot of the time they're just really honest so it makes me feel OK for how I feel sometimes..... I agree with you, it definitely feels more credible.

It feels like marketing of day to day brands like ASOS and Boohoo is a lot more subtle.... every day people are their models these days. But then when I was in London at the weekend I saw a massive ad for Breitling watches with Charlize Theron and Brad Pitt and some other guy..... they're using big name movie stars to inspire "making it" perhaps, or at the least the drive to do better? It feels like there is a divide those with money are inspired by celebrity royalty, and those those earning less connect more with everyday people?
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Jack22031994
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#6
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I dont really trust anyone but myself so no.

Most of them speak a load of rubbish half the time. I don't care for any of it.
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She-Ra
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#7
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(Original post by Jack22031994)
I dont really trust anyone but myself so no
Interesting....If you had to choose to trust someone do you think you would choose a traditional celebrity like a film star or an individual who had rose to fame through thousands of people following them?
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Jack22031994
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(Original post by She-Ra)
Interesting....If you had to choose to trust someone do you think you would choose a traditional celebrity like a film star or an individual who had rose to fame through thousands of people following them?
Neither, to be honest, but Im basically a cynical old man already :lol:
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Snufkin
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#9
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Maybe - but most celebrities who do endorsements are not exactly A-list, are they? You just have to watch an episode of Celebrity Pointless to know how relatively obscure and talentless a 'celebrity' is these days. If social media influencers are becoming more like them... well, that's no real surprise.

I'm not sure I buy the 'at least they use the products' argument. How do you know they actually use them off camera? I think people are lulled into believing lifestyle vlogs are real life - they're not, they're scripted, edited and polished to an absurd degree. It might be low budget but it's just as fake as TV. You can't trust Zoella or any other social media influencer to give you useful buying tips or point you in the way of a bargain. Unfortunately, there are a lot of gullible people out there who buy into the fantasy. :dontknow:
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nonotyoutoo
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#10
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(Original post by Liverpool Hope University Guest Lecturer)
There has been a rise in the use and daily interactions with social media in the past 20 years. New 'celebrities have risen out of moderate obscurity. For a good example of this, we can look at 'Zoella', a beauty vlogger who has shot to fame in just under nine years. The impact of her popularity was demonstrated when she released her first book in 2014. The book was the fastest selling book of that year and broke the record for the highest first weeks sales for a debut author.

With the rise of these social celebrities over the last decade or so, are we now being marketed to in different ways? Are social influencers become the new celebrity endorsers?

________________________________ ________________________________ __________________________

Dr Clay Grandsen is a Lecturer of Marketing who teaches across all levels, from undergraduate to postgraduate. His PhD was in the area of customer delight in the hospitality sector. In addition to Dr. Gransden's academic expertise, he also has over 10 years’ experience working in the Hospitality and Marketing sector. His main area of focus is now on consumer behaviour, focusing specifically on fans and purchase behaviour.
it depends if they are ever critical, or always a dopey shill.

for example, Doug De Muro for cars does not shy away from blasting the car maker for poor design choices and is often funny. The same goes for Linus Techtips for reviewing the lastest pc components and gadgets.

if they were all positive all the time, then they would not be listened to. but because they are critical and talk in plain terms to people who watch it, they are more effective than an advertisement, provided your product is good.

obviously, cars and tech are very different to girl blogging makeup and clothes, their mileage may differ.
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RetroGent2001
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(Original post by Liverpool Hope University Guest Lecturer)
There has been a rise in the use and daily interactions with social media in the past 20 years. New 'celebrities have risen out of moderate obscurity. For a good example of this, we can look at 'Zoella', a beauty vlogger who has shot to fame in just under nine years. The impact of her popularity was demonstrated when she released her first book in 2014. The book was the fastest selling book of that year and broke the record for the highest first weeks sales for a debut author.

With the rise of these social celebrities over the last decade or so, are we now being marketed to in different ways? Are social influencers become the new celebrity endorsers?

________________________________ ________________________________ __________________________

Dr Clay Grandsen is a Lecturer of Marketing who teaches across all levels, from undergraduate to postgraduate. His PhD was in the area of customer delight in the hospitality sector. In addition to Dr. Gransden's academic expertise, he also has over 10 years’ experience working in the Hospitality and Marketing sector. His main area of focus is now on consumer behaviour, focusing specifically on fans and purchase behaviour.
They are not celebrities.
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She-Ra
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#12
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(Original post by RetroGent2001)
They are not celebrities.
Does that matter? :moon:
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Nibblet27
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#13
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(Original post by Liverpool Hope University Guest Lecturer)
There has been a rise in the use and daily interactions with social media in the past 20 years. New 'celebrities have risen out of moderate obscurity. For a good example of this, we can look at 'Zoella', a beauty vlogger who has shot to fame in just under nine years. The impact of her popularity was demonstrated when she released her first book in 2014. The book was the fastest selling book of that year and broke the record for the highest first weeks sales for a debut author.

With the rise of these social celebrities over the last decade or so, are we now being marketed to in different ways? Are social influencers become the new celebrity endorsers?

________________________________ ________________________________ __________________________

Dr Clay Grandsen is a Lecturer of Marketing who teaches across all levels, from undergraduate to postgraduate. His PhD was in the area of customer delight in the hospitality sector. In addition to Dr. Gransden's academic expertise, he also has over 10 years’ experience working in the Hospitality and Marketing sector. His main area of focus is now on consumer behaviour, focusing specifically on fans and purchase behaviour.
I have been to a few business talks recently where they take this a step further.

Incentive programs for employees to market, advertise and promote their service/product on social media. This is such a worrying trend, with the 'celebrities' we look up to promoting shadely, and now even our friends and real connections we have made bombarding us with advertising, it seems we are being bombarded from all sides with marketing and advertising!

Very dystopian if you ask me.
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Fullofsurprises
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#14
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Not all, but many of the 'influencers' turn out to be incredibly shallow, narcissistic people on close inspection. This isn't really surprising since (so far) social media mainly acts as an engine for the promotion of vanity and self-regard. Serious ideas. the appreciation of what is generally better in life, the sharing of genuine struggles, don't rank high.

Social media are currently a key element in global capitalism - they are sales platforms for product launches and rampant consumerism. The people that feature strongly in that ecology are unlikely to be influencing anything much beyond the choice of smartphone or the latest overpriced facial cream. They are only celebrities or celebrity-endorsers of the worthless and the tacky.
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Jackudy3
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I'd argue that once you're a 'social influencer', what you actually are is a celebrity.
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RetroGent2001
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#16
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(Original post by She-Ra)
Does that matter? :moon:
Yes. The thread asked are they the new celebrity endorsers. They can’t be celebrity endorsers if they aren’t celebrities.
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Cassie.test.2018
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#17
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I agree. I don’t think social influencers are completely killing off celebrity endorsement, but actually they are becoming a new type of celebrity themselves. You could argue a YouTuber with a million subscribers is just as ‘famous’ as a TV personality who would be considered a celebrity. But even with celebrity endorsement these days I'm sure their social following will be considered and taken into account. Take the online fashion world, they are always announcing new collaborations with people who have hundreds of thousands even millions of followers, regardless of their celebrity status. It’s all about their following. However, I think we’re all becoming a bit wiser to influencers in general and the ways in which they’re using their platform to endorse products. The amount of promotion I see on Instagram is crazy, and the perception that these are all real people is slowly dying as they post less and less organic content.
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username4344212
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#18
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I don't personally trust a blogger or social media personality if they start to talk about particular products as I am always suspiscious that they are just being paid to say a product is good. In pafrticular, with beauty and skincare products which can be very expensive and make ludicrous claims. In addition, as they are able to prepare for their picutres and posts I wonder how real these images of them really are.

I suppose it is dependent on what they are endoring. For instance, in the world of fitness people like Joe Wicks aka the Body Coach, Kayla Itsines from the SWEAT app promote their products on their different Social Media platforms all the time and I feel that I trust their opinions. Also, people like Aerie model Iskra Lawrence as a promoter of real bodies and body positivity, I would be more inclined to take her endorsements more seriously....
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Werbinich
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#19
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I think influencers will disappear over time. It's a huge hype now and every company wants someone to promote their product on Instagram but people are smart and can differentiate a sponsored post from a real one.

I personally don't feel "influenced" by these posts on insta but seeing Angelina Jolie going on a mission to improve children's lives in Cambodia does "influence" and inspire me.
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username4344212
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(Original post by Cassie.test.2018)
I agree. I don’t think social influencers are completely killing off celebrity endorsement, but actually they are becoming a new type of celebrity themselves. You could argue a YouTuber with a million subscribers is just as ‘famous’ as a TV personality who would be considered a celebrity. But even with celebrity endorsement these days I'm sure their social following will be considered and taken into account. Take the online fashion world, they are always announcing new collaborations with people who have hundreds of thousands even millions of followers, regardless of their celebrity status. It’s all about their following. However, I think we’re all becoming a bit wiser to influencers in general and the ways in which they’re using their platform to endorse products. The amount of promotion I see on Instagram is crazy, and the perception that these are all real people is slowly dying as they post less and less organic content.
What do you think is the real difference between a YouTuber or Social Influencer and a Celebrity? Do you think we could say that they are selected by an agent and not by the people? Or do you see it as a level of talent?
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