"Is it ever ok to charge family for Christmas lunch?" Thoughts? Watch

PhilanderingBum
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Just stumbled across this rather interesting article: https://www.bbc.com/news/business-46345677

As someone who hates sharing, is a natural tightwad and a bit of a grinch, I can wholeheartedly sympathise with anyone who wanted to charge family members for scoffing their grub and drinking their booze. Seriously, I find giving gifts to others physically painful
Having said that, if my grandparents demanded I pay them £17 for the privilege of eating food in their house, I'd tell them to go die in a hole.
Personally, as a student, I'm not going to shell out on train faires for the journey home only only to have to cough up more £££ so I can sit on my arse all day eating mince-pies and attempting to drink the boredom away. I'd rather stock up on fish and chips and stay in halls. But that's just me...

What do you think?
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LeapingLucy
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I think it depends on how many people are attending - if one member of the family is hosting 30 people, it would be pretty unfair to expect them to cover the entire cost, as it'd probably be several hundred pounds.

Though I think it's nicer - where possible - if each guest brings a food contribution instead. I.e. one person does the sprouts, another makes the Christmas cake etc.
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bumblebeehugger
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almost never acceptable. if you're inviting someone over for dinner, you don't ask them to pay - YOU ASKED THEM TO COME
however, on the rare occasion they invite themselves, it's reasonable to get them to bring something with them, whether it be a dish, drinks, or money
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londonmyst
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I'm with you 200% as regards the "go die in a hole" response to ancestor demands for payment.
Christmas is my favourite time of the year.
I can't reconcile the season of festive jolliness and goodwill to all with stingy scrooges trying to put a price tag on family members eating food in their house.

Luckily so many business and people are willing to provide free Christmas cheer and food.
The Alexandra Pub in Wimbledon provides a free Christmas meal and drinks to anyone who wants to come every year, last year they fed over 70 people.
Shish Restaurant in Sidcup, a turkish eatery, offers free Christmas meals between 12-6pm on Christmas day so that "nobody eats alone".
Nigella Lawson has a habit of taking in distant acquaintances as soon as she hears they plan to spend Christmas alone, she feeds them a sumptuous Christmas dinner entirely free of charge.
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Tiger Rag
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I think it's cheeky. It's better to suggest could you please either bring something, help with the cooking or washing up.
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pemzy
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My family always goes out for Christmas Dinner so everyone pays for their meal
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TimmonaPortella
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I think it would be bad enough to invite people to dinner and then try to charge them at any time of year, but at Christmas it's particularly ridiculous.

Wouldn't judge if people are really short of money and they come to a collective decision about the cost. Outside of that narrow set of circumstances, though, of course it's not okay.
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Sammylou40
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It’s better to ask people to bring a part of the meal.
Ie something for a starter or pudding
And it’s not unreasonable at all to ask drinkers to bring a bottle
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Kallisto
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If it is an invitation for a christmas dinner, it stands to reason to pay this by yourself. If I can't afford a dinner for family or another people they come, I don't waste a thought on it.

Instead of charging, gather a small crowd of people to collect money and go eating a nice Christmas food in a good restaurant. That is cheaper AND acceptable.
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Claire461
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My lot all chip in money for the Christmas food over Christmas Day and Boxing Day. We draw lots for who does the shopping and who does the cooking.
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J Papi
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this is peak late-stage capitalism

The best way to reciprocate is to rotate who hosts/pays for the lunch or dinner and ensure that everyone is cooking or buying at least one item for the table
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Kallisto
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(Original post by Tiger Rag)
I think it's cheeky. It's better to suggest could you please either bring something, help with the cooking or washing up.
That is a good suggestion, but I would not insist on bringing something or washing up, asking politely instead. Request for help with cooking is alright.
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College_Dropout
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Sure, as longs as its put forward before hand and they dont get pissed off when no one takes up on the offer.
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Sammylou40
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(Original post by Seamus123)My lot all chip in money for the Christmas food over Christmas Day and Boxing Day. We draw lots for who does the shopping and who does the cooking.


👍👍
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Claire461
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(Original post by Sammylou40)
(Original post by Seamus123)My lot all chip in money for the Christmas food over Christmas Day and Boxing Day. We draw lots for who does the shopping and who does the cooking.


👍👍
I just supervise. I’m the boss.
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Sammylou40
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(Original post by Seamus123)
I just supervise. I’m the boss.
That’s the perfect place to be
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username4094562
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Go volunteer at a homeless shelter for a day instead if you don't want to spend money on your loved ones during Christmas. It might help teach you to value the people you have in your life who you can still call family and will be there for you.
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gjd800
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Lol no
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yudothis
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This problem is so British.
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ANM775
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
I think it depends on how many people are attending - if one member of the family is hosting 30 people, it would be pretty unfair to expect them to cover the entire cost, as it'd probably be several hundred pounds.

Though I think it's nicer - where possible - if each guest brings a food contribution instead. I.e. one person does the sprouts, another makes the Christmas cake etc.

It's Cheeky tbh.

If you can't afford to cook for everyone don't invite everyone.

30 People sounds ridiculous. You'd have to hire a hall. You'd need more than one oven too ...and likely several fridges. Unless you literally live in a mansion ...I do not think hosting for 30 people is realistically feasable.


Having said that, I do appreciate that food wise, Christmas can be expensive.

If the parents are old and not working then it becomes a bit more understandable demanding a contribution.
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