Confused about a levels and degree options Watch

Starjalsha
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I need to choose my a levels within two weeks and I am very confused. I have to choose between mathematics, further mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, dt: product design and spanish. I have no idea what I want to be older, all careers sound appealing, whether it be engineering, medicine, banking, design etc. I would say I like all of the subjects equally apart from mathematics which is my favourite subject. What should i do?
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AzureCeleste
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Take maths then as you enjoy that the most.
Consider why you will miss each of your subjects and for what reasons they are. Then from that determine what you want to do. If it's because of the people that you enjoy the subject and not the actual subject as such then maybe don't take that
Hope this helps a little
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Estera11
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I think that you should do what you like. If you like maths, you could choose the subjects that are related to it, such as Mathematics, Further Mathematics and probably economics. This was the way I chose my subjects and I don’t regret it.
Wish you good luck with your choice!
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iseesparksfly
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Anything but biology
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username1208026
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Maths is the top trump when it comes to employability in the 21st Century. You will succeed at what you enjoy.

A
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artful_lounger
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If you enjoy maths the most, it would be sensible to take that. It would probably also be a good idea to take A-level Further Maths. This pair would immediately give you the option of any maths, economics, or CS degree programmes, as well as a couple of engineering ones. This is in addition to those subjects which don't have any specific requirements (such as law or many philosophy or social science degrees). From there it depends somewhat on your interests and aptitudes thus far. Taking A-level Physics is a common route with the above pair, as it has some cumulative content in mechanics and in terms of the "style" is relatively similar as far as your homework and exam preparation will go (working through problems).

A-level Economics isn't hugely uncommon, although it doesn't open any options not already avaialble (notably it isn't required to study economics at university - nor, on a slightly tangent, is an essay subject required to study law incidentally). A-level Chemistry would instead open possibilities in chemistry, and some chemical engineering or materials science courses (however quite a few just require either A-level Physics or Chemistry, so many would still be an option with A-level Physics). Most medical schools only consider Maths/FM as a single subject, so just taking double maths and A-level Chemistry wouldn't meet many medicine course requirements alone. However taken as part of 4 with another subject (e.g. A-level Physics being the most sensible and common combination) you will meet the entry criteria for quite a few medical schools as far as subjects go so it is an option. A-level Biology is not required for medicine overall, although a few medical schools do require it, but there are plenty you could apply to without it. Biology also doesn't really fit with double maths otherwise (I think Imperial biomedical engineering requires A-level Maths/Physics/Biology, but otherwise most courses require A-level Biology also require A-level Chemistry, and FM tends to not be so useful for those.

Taking 4 subjects where you're taking A-level Maths/FM isn't uncommon, and most taking it seem to think it's less work than 4 otherwise unrelated A-levels (especially if Physics is also taken) due to the cumulative content (this may be skewed by people taking double maths as part of 4 A-levels tend to be quite strong in academics generally though). In this case, one option would be double maths and A-level Chemistry and Physics. This is a pretty common combination, and offers an exceptionally wide range of options for degree level study - maths, CS, economics, law, medicine, engineering, physics, chemistry, earth sciences, materials, chemical engineering, plus a number of other "generalist" courses such as psychology, sociology, and so on.

I would note "banking" as a career doesn't require any specific degree background - the only important thing is where you study (i.e. a target university). Some roles might prefer or require a "numerate" degree (essentially any STEM course or economics/finance degrees), and quanitative finance specifically will usually require you to have done a heavily mathematical course (i.e. maths, CS, physics - typically along with a masters and/or PhD). Broadly speaking though, your degree subject isn't going to be the limiting factor going into that area.
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Starjalsha
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Thank you so much!!
(Original post by artful_lounger)If you enjoy maths the most, it would be sensible to take that. It would probably also be a good idea to take A-level Further Maths. This pair would immediately give you the option of any maths, economics, or CS degree programmes, as well as a couple of engineering ones. This is in addition to those subjects which don't have any specific requirements (such as law or many philosophy or social science degrees). From there it depends somewhat on your interests and aptitudes thus far. Taking A-level Physics is a common route with the above pair, as it has some cumulative content in mechanics and in terms of the "style" is relatively similar as far as your homework and exam preparation will go (working through problems).

A-level Economics isn't hugely uncommon, although it doesn't open any options not already avaialble (notably it isn't required to study economics at university - nor, on a slightly tangent, is an essay subject required to study law incidentally). A-level Chemistry would instead open possibilities in chemistry, and some chemical engineering or materials science courses (however quite a few just require either A-level Physics or Chemistry, so many would still be an option with A-level Physics). Most medical schools only consider Maths/FM as a single subject, so just taking double maths and A-level Chemistry wouldn't meet many medicine course requirements alone. However taken as part of 4 with another subject (e.g. A-level Physics being the most sensible and common combination) you will meet the entry criteria for quite a few medical schools as far as subjects go so it is an option. A-level Biology is not required for medicine overall, although a few medical schools do require it, but there are plenty you could apply to without it. Biology also doesn't really fit with double maths otherwise (I think Imperial biomedical engineering requires A-level Maths/Physics/Biology, but otherwise most courses require A-level Biology also require A-level Chemistry, and FM tends to not be so useful for those.

Taking 4 subjects where you're taking A-level Maths/FM isn't uncommon, and most taking it seem to think it's less work than 4 otherwise unrelated A-levels (especially if Physics is also taken) due to the cumulative content (this may be skewed by people taking double maths as part of 4 A-levels tend to be quite strong in academics generally though). In this case, one option would be double maths and A-level Chemistry and Physics. This is a pretty common combination, and offers an exceptionally wide range of options for degree level study - maths, CS, economics, law, medicine, engineering, physics, chemistry, earth sciences, materials, chemical engineering, plus a number of other "generalist" courses such as psychology, sociology, and so on.

I would note "banking" as a career doesn't require any specific degree background - the only important thing is where you study (i.e. a target university). Some roles might prefer or require a "numerate" degree (essentially any STEM course or economics/finance degrees), and quanitative finance specifically will usually require you to have done a heavily mathematical course (i.e. maths, CS, physics - typically along with a masters and/or PhD). Broadly speaking though, your degree subject isn't going to be the limiting factor going into that area.
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Starjalsha
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Why not biology?
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iamthestudent
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
If you enjoy maths the most, it would be sensible to take that. It would probably also be a good idea to take A-level Further Maths. This pair would immediately give you the option of any maths, economics, or CS degree programmes, as well as a couple of engineering ones. This is in addition to those subjects which don't have any specific requirements (such as law or many philosophy or social science degrees). From there it depends somewhat on your interests and aptitudes thus far. Taking A-level Physics is a common route with the above pair, as it has some cumulative content in mechanics and in terms of the "style" is relatively similar as far as your homework and exam preparation will go (working through problems).

A-level Economics isn't hugely uncommon, although it doesn't open any options not already avaialble (notably it isn't required to study economics at university - nor, on a slightly tangent, is an essay subject required to study law incidentally). A-level Chemistry would instead open possibilities in chemistry, and some chemical engineering or materials science courses (however quite a few just require either A-level Physics or Chemistry, so many would still be an option with A-level Physics). Most medical schools only consider Maths/FM as a single subject, so just taking double maths and A-level Chemistry wouldn't meet many medicine course requirements alone. However taken as part of 4 with another subject (e.g. A-level Physics being the most sensible and common combination) you will meet the entry criteria for quite a few medical schools as far as subjects go so it is an option. A-level Biology is not required for medicine overall, although a few medical schools do require it, but there are plenty you could apply to without it. Biology also doesn't really fit with double maths otherwise (I think Imperial biomedical engineering requires A-level Maths/Physics/Biology, but otherwise most courses require A-level Biology also require A-level Chemistry, and FM tends to not be so useful for those.

Taking 4 subjects where you're taking A-level Maths/FM isn't uncommon, and most taking it seem to think it's less work than 4 otherwise unrelated A-levels (especially if Physics is also taken) due to the cumulative content (this may be skewed by people taking double maths as part of 4 A-levels tend to be quite strong in academics generally though). In this case, one option would be double maths and A-level Chemistry and Physics. This is a pretty common combination, and offers an exceptionally wide range of options for degree level study - maths, CS, economics, law, medicine, engineering, physics, chemistry, earth sciences, materials, chemical engineering, plus a number of other "generalist" courses such as psychology, sociology, and so on.

I would note "banking" as a career doesn't require any specific degree background - the only important thing is where you study (i.e. a target university). Some roles might prefer or require a "numerate" degree (essentially any STEM course or economics/finance degrees), and quanitative finance specifically will usually require you to have done a heavily mathematical course (i.e. maths, CS, physics - typically along with a masters and/or PhD). Broadly speaking though, your degree subject isn't going to be the limiting factor going into that area.
I agree with most of this however, I think that taking Further Maths is pointless unless you want to study maths at university or really enjoy the subject and want to take it to further your knowledge. You are best sticking with three subjects in my opinion.

Also, if you are interested in taking medicine then this should be something your heart is really in. If not perhaps don’t go for it as there are a lot of requirements and stress involved with a career in this field. I know a lot of people that regret applying for medicine this year as they were forced into it even though there are many other really interesting subjects to study at Uni. Engineering and computer science seem like really good paths for the future.
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