Advice on whether I should leave my graduate job and accept an apprenticeship offer Watch

Punisher1996
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Hello,

I graduated last year and I’m currently working for the Civil Service as an economist. I don’t enjoy my job and I’ve always wanted to pursue a career in accounting. I came across an apprenticeship in accounting in my department, the starting salary (24k) is lower than what I’m earning now but it increases to 30k after one year, and to 32k after the second year which is appealing.

However, you do not need a degree to apply for this job as it’s an apprenticeship which is making me think about whether I should accept this offer. I would feel like I wasted three years and accumulated debt for nothing.

Do you think I should accept this offer or just continue working as an economist?




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ajj2000
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(Original post by Punisher1996)
Hello,

I graduated last year and I’m currently working for the Civil Service as an economist. I don’t enjoy my job and I’ve always wanted to pursue a career in accounting. I came across an apprenticeship in accounting in my department, the starting salary (24k) is lower than what I’m earning now but it increases to 30k after one year, and to 32k after the second year which is appealing.

However, you do not need a degree to apply for this job as it’s an apprenticeship which is making me think about whether I should accept this offer. I would feel like I wasted three years and accumulated debt for nothing.

Do you think I should accept this offer or just continue working as an economist?


What is the training package associated with the scheme ( professional exams - which ones, time off for study etc?). Which city is the job based in?
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Punisher1996
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(Original post by ajj2000)
What is the training package associated with the scheme ( professional exams - which ones, time off for study etc?). Which city is the job based in?
ACCA and the job is based in westminster, London. And yes, there will be time off for study.
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cheesecakelove
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If they have made you an offer, and accounting is something that you are interested to pursue as opposed to economics, it might be worth taking the offer or looking for other roles to help you break into accounting as a career. The starting salary might be lower to what you are getting now, but if you are more interested in it, you will be more motivated to work hard and build up your career, and your pay with increase with this.

A lot of people have careers in fields which are different to what they studied - it is a matter of finding something that you enjoy, and you will have gained transferrable skills and contacts during your time at uni which might be useful later on.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by Punisher1996)
ACCA and the job is based in westminster, London. And yes, there will be time off for study.
Look, if you can get a job as an economist you must be super capable and have a lot of options. One question is whether you want to train in the civil service or not? There are pros and cons.

The term 'apprentice' is pretty widely used - increasingly due to funding arrangements so I don't think this indicates a lower level of work. The salary growth would indicate that the work will be skilled so thats fine, and I'd guess the professional training arrangements are as good as it gets.

With regards to the salary, for comparison:

- with a general entry level job in a normal business in London you might be looking at £25-27k. Pay rises not at all certain nor promised

- Better grad schemes in industry? I'm out of date - around £32k? But not easy to get on and tend to be pretty agressive workloads.

- Big 4 - £29k? Very heavy workload. Smaller CA firms would pay less than this. The pay doenst tend to increase hugely until you qualify.

For quality of life for the next few years I'll bet the civil service offer the best deal - when you take off tax and student loan repayments you don't suffer hugely in year one and catch up after that. Plus you keep the pension and continuity of service. There can be a downside should you wish to move into industry after working in public sector for any length of time. This is somewhat dependant on the type of work you are doing and whether you have any expertise to sell elsewhere.
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ajj2000
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Just thought - there was a guy posting on this board a while ago who was on a GES grad scheme wanting to move to accountancy. Might be worth contacting him to see what his experience has been.
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LastDiscovery
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I am a very experienced ACCA teacher and I teach extremely well. I can tutor you from the beginning of ACCA over skype and you will pay me after each class.

Feel free to contact me.

Skype me on Skype at: ACCA Skype Tutor
or Facebook me at: Last Discovery
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