Harvard Referencing an Internet source

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Lucky987
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Hey, I have question regarding referencing

So I got some information from an internet article source, in which a special person is being interviewed and asked.
When I write for example... According to Ralph (the interviewee) do I write the year of the quote next to his name or not??? Like Ralph (2016)?

I already know that an in-text citation of the interviewer's or author's name+year of the article has to be inserted at the end of the sentence....
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Lucky987
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bump..
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Lucky987
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bump... or is my question not really clear?
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by Lucky987)
Hey, I have question regarding referencing

So I got some information from an internet article source, in which a special person is being interviewed and asked.
When I write for example... According to Ralph (the interviewee) do I write the year of the quote next to his name or not??? Like Ralph (2016)?

I already know that an in-text citation of the interviewer's or author's name+year of the article has to be inserted at the end of the sentence....
Do you mean putting the date next to the interviewee's name as well as next the author's name, or instead of? Putting the date next to the author's name is crucial; putting the date next to the interviewee's name (unless it's part of a direct quote from the article) seems wholly unnecessary and potentially confusing for the reader as to who the author of the article actually is.

EDIT: okay, just reread your OP, and I'm still unsure what you're actually writing. If the article's author is quoting/referencing another author, i.e. summarising the ideas of Ralph, you should use something like (Ralph, cited in/by Author, Date). I'm sorry if I've got the wrong end of the stick, but without a mock example (don't use the real example in case it gets flagged during plagiarism checks), it's difficult to understand what you need to know.
Last edited by PhoenixFortune; 2 years ago
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Lucky987
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(Original post by PhoenixFortune)
Do you mean putting the date next to the interviewee's name as well as next the author's name, or instead of? Putting the date next to the author's name is crucial; putting the date next to the interviewee's name (unless it's part of a direct quote from the article) seems wholly unnecessary and potentially confusing for the reader as to who the author of the article actually is.

EDIT: okay, just reread your OP, and I'm still unsure what you're actually writing. If the article's author is quoting/referencing another author, i.e. summarising the ideas of Ralph, you should use something like (Ralph, cited in/by Author, Date). I'm sorry if I've got the wrong end of the stick, but without a mock example (don't use the real example in case it gets flagged during plagiarism checks), it's difficult to understand what you need to know.
You got it right! So basically it's not a must to type the year to the interviewee's name. Thanks and I'm sorry that I didn't make it clear enough.

If an author of a book (where you got your information from) cites another author from a different source, which you use or direct quote, <- do you have to add that source into your reference list as well?
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by Lucky987)
You got it right! So basically it's not a must to type the year to the interviewee's name. Thanks and I'm sorry that I didn't make it clear enough.

If an author of a book (where you got your information from) cites another author from a different source, which you use or direct quote, <- do you have to add that source into your reference list as well?
The author may use something like: "This area of study has many strengths, as Smith (1990) found that it can be replicated easily" or "The research was concluded as "being hard to do but worthwhile" (Smith, 1990)". The first is using paraphrasing, and the second is a direct quote. Both can be cited as "(Smith, 1990, cited in Jones, 2002)" or something similar -- maybe double check your university's referencing guidelines for their preferred way of dealing with secondary references like these. Most of the time you only include the source you have consulted in your reference list, so in this example Jones (2002) (as you never actually read the original source by Smith), but this can vary by university.

Ideally though, you shouldn't use too many secondary references like these, as you would be expected to find and read Smith (1990) for yourself if you can (and therefore you can reference Smith directly). If Smith (1990) isn't available to you, then secondary referencing is more acceptable.
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