Why is Open University looked down upon? Watch

username4337698
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#1
When I go to school and talk about universities with my friends they always seem to joke about studying at Open University and talk about it as if it is some sort of meme. I also heard some people qualified to do PhDs and Master at top universities after studying at the Open University so it really doesn't very bad. Why is Open University looked down upon?
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 8 months ago
#2
(Original post by Lucasash9)
Why is Open University looked down upon?
It's not, really, is the short answer.
1
reply
ObedientBeliever
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report 8 months ago
#3
People just hear rumours about Open university, people think because it is online and cheap(tuition fees) it is crap and they do not really know about it! My friend wants to apply there for her undergraduate degree so go for it, if you are interested.
0
reply
nintysixthousand
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report 8 months ago
#4
The only negative thing i hear about it is how easy it is to fall behind and drop out
0
reply
Joinedup
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 8 months ago
#5
The OU wasn't set up for 18 year olds, it was set up for people who couldn't attend full time at a brick uni - usually cos they were adults with full time jobs.

tbh I think it's a bit odd that so many 6th form leavers seem to be thinking about it - maybe if you've got serious, untreatable social anxiety or something (and good luck getting a job if you literally can't handle the social interaction at a conventional uni)
0
reply
username4337698
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#6
(Original post by Joinedup)
The OU wasn't set up for 18 year olds, it was set up for people who couldn't attend full time at a brick uni - usually cos they were adults with full time jobs.

tbh I think it's a bit odd that so many 6th form leavers seem to be thinking about it - maybe if you've got serious, untreatable social anxiety or something (and good luck getting a job if you literally can't handle the social interaction at a conventional uni)
I was thinking about OU because I was looking at doing Physics, Engineering and Maths but that isn't an existing degree at uni. So if I applied for the three courses at OU I would be able to get the triple degree I wanted.
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 8 months ago
#7
(Original post by Lucasash9)
I was thinking about OU because I was looking at doing Physics, Engineering and Maths but that isn't an existing degree at uni. So if I applied for the three courses at OU I would be able to get the triple degree I wanted.
You get maths and physics degrees, you get engineering physics degrees (okay, I am only aware of Loughborough offering this), and you get engineering maths degree (okay, I am only aware of Bristol offering this).

Why do you want to do a degree in all three of those subjects? If you like maths and equations then maths and/or physics degrees will have plenty of that - no need to add on engineering unless you want to become an engineer. And if you do want to become an engineer, it's probably more advisable to study an engineering degree.
0
reply
foofoochate
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#8
Report 8 months ago
#8
It's not looked down upon afaik. Maybe some people are ignorant about what degrees are and how accreditation works.

OU isn't comparable to a full time university that you attend. If you are looking for one you wouldn't want the other.
0
reply
fallen_acorns
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 8 months ago
#9
its just people being snobby. Just like with russel group, oxford/cambridge, ex-polys etc.

People will always find something to be snobby about - its part of our culture somewhat to be a snobby country.

--

In reality though OU is a great tool for those its designed for. Its not really for 18 year olds in general, but more for older professionals and individuals who want to study but can't attend full-time universities or can't go in person to lectures and the like.

My mother studied her undergraduate degree and masters with OU.. she was a childminder when I was a baby, but wanted to earn more for her family, so she studied her degree part time with OU whilst still working full time as a childminder and raising me and my sister. She started working for colleges after, and did her masters with OU a few years later. 20 years later she has another masters, has been the deputy head of major colleges, and now manages a department in a university while she waits to retire. None of which would have been possible without the OU.

The only slightly problem for the OU these days, is unlike 20 years ago, is that now a lot of main-stream universities that also offer distance learning. They are a bit hit-miss though with how much support and how organised they are. But the bennifit is that you know you are getting the exact same course as people there in person.. your just far away. This is the route I chose - I work full time running my business, but I am also studying my masters via. distance learning.
0
reply
JohanGRK
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 8 months ago
#10
Not selective
Not much research going on (inb4 some1 quotes literally one paper that was published by an OU academic as if this proves me wrong)
Variable levels of employer attention

Not that these make the OU less necessary or valuable of an institution overall. You need some institutions to snap up the high-flyers at age 18, and others to help those with actual responsibilities ease their ways back into HE.
1
reply
DarthRoar
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report 8 months ago
#11
Anyone can do a course there. There is 0 prestige and 0 selectivity.

"I went to Cambridge" or "I went to a RG university" = oh, they've worked hard and achieved well, and secured a place at a great institution!

"I did the Open University" = hm, doesn't really mean much other than they did some work, who knows whether they put effort or achieved well.
0
reply
foofoochate
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#12
Report 8 months ago
#12
(Original post by DarthRoar)
Anyone can do a course there. There is 0 prestige and 0 selectivity.

"I went to Cambridge" or "I went to a RG university" = oh, they've worked hard and achieved well, and secured a place at a great institution!

"I did the Open University" = hm, doesn't really mean much other than they did some work, who knows whether they put effort or achieved well.
But their degree classification will tell you how well they did 😁
Last edited by foofoochate; 8 months ago
1
reply
DarthRoar
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#13
Report 8 months ago
#13
(Original post by foofoochate)
But their degree classification will tell you how well they did:-*(^^)
Sure, but we all know that someone with a first from the open university is leagues behind someone with a first from Cambridge.
1
reply
foofoochate
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#14
Report 8 months ago
#14
(Original post by DarthRoar)
Sure, but we all know that someone with a first from the open university is leagues behind someone with a first from Cambridge.
Behind in what sense?
I personally do not know that. Not denying, but how would I know? How do you know?
0
reply
cantwait125
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#15
Report 4 weeks ago
#15
I think you need to pull your elitist stick out your butt. Professionals have a full time job whilst studying part time at OU where as statistically only the upper class and more wealthy students are able to attend Cambridge. Recent figures show that 80% of Cambridge University offers were to those of a richer stature. Consider all the variables before making an argument - signed off as an OU student (I hope I have enlightened you)
0
reply
leannemellisa
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#16
Report 4 weeks ago
#16
I would like to know how you've come to the conclusion of this? OU marks much more harshly than brick unis, and you need higher grades in OU to achieve a first you have to score above 85% in your assignments with OU for a 1st, Im currently studying with them but hoping to go to a brick uni next year, not because i dislike the OU, but because I want to be able to complete my degree quicker and found that universities accept OU credits in lieu of A levels. but yeah, as a current OU student i can tell you its not easy work and you don't get marked as if youre in nursery school, our tutors also teach at brick unis and many say that OU is no different in the professional world to brick unis. I know people who have studied law at brick unis and gotten nowhere, i know people who are now successful solicitors and people getting ready to begin a pupilage to become barristers from the OU.
(Original post by DarthRoar)
Sure, but we all know that someone with a first from the open university is leagues behind someone with a first from Cambridge.
0
reply
JohanGRK
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#17
Report 4 weeks ago
#17
(Original post by leannemellisa)
I would like to know how you've come to the conclusion of this? OU marks much more harshly than brick unis, and you need higher grades in OU to achieve a first you have to score above 85% in your assignments with OU for a 1st
If it's as easy to get that 85 at the OU as it is to get a 70 at a brick uni, your point is moot. Is there anything else that leads you to believe that the OU would mark a degree more harshly than a 'brick' uni? Which 'brick' unis are you comparing the OU to?
1
reply
Democracy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#18
Report 4 weeks ago
#18
(Original post by username4337698)
When I go to school and talk about universities with my friends they always seem to joke about studying at Open University and talk about it as if it is some sort of meme. I also heard some people qualified to do PhDs and Master at top universities after studying at the Open University so it really doesn't very bad. Why is Open University looked down upon?
There's your problem
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts

All the exam results help you need

830

people online now

225,530

students helped last year
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Dundee
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Mon, 26 Aug '19
  • University of Aberdeen
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Tue, 27 Aug '19
  • Norwich University of the Arts
    Postgraduate (MA) Open Day Postgraduate
    Sat, 31 Aug '19

Do you have grade requirements for your sixth form/college?

At least 5 GCSEs at grade 4 (65)
14.41%
At least 5 GCSEs at grade 5 (70)
15.52%
At least 5 GCSEs at grade 6 (86)
19.07%
Higher than 5 GCSEs at grade 6 (181)
40.13%
Pass in English and Maths GCSE (21)
4.66%
No particular grades needed (28)
6.21%

Watched Threads

View All