Lukem14
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Hi could anyone help with what the following mean-
Immediate gratification
Triangulation
Fatalism
Interactionalsm

Thank you!
Last edited by Lukem14; 2 years ago
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Lukem14
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(Original post by Lukem14)
Hi could anyone help with what the following mean-
Immediate gratification
Triangulation
Fatalism
Interactionalsm

Thank you!
..
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bwilliams
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(Original post by Lukem14)
Hi could anyone help with what the following mean-
Immediate gratification
Triangulation
Fatalism
Interactionalsm

Thank you!
Hi Luke,

'Immediate gratification' is an opposing term of 'deferred gratification' - for example, if I was to recieve my pay at the end of the week and blow it there and then on a shopping spree, that would be immediate gratification - if I saved my pay over a period of 8 weeks to purchase something much more meaningful that I had wanted for sometime that would be deferred gratification. This can also be linked to a variety of situations including education, revising over periods of time to get good grades would be deferred gratification as you are working hard over a long period of time to get a reward. In contrast, not revising and watching the TV every night of the week would be immediate gratification as you are being rewarded immediately (if you see watching TV a reward).

'Triangulation' is related to methodology - you will usually see this in research methods. This is where sociologists may dip into different methods or different views to test for the same result. This is suggested to improve validitiy (how 'valid' a study is). Sociologists will usually be in favour of specific research methods but where useful will dip into others to check their work. This is essentially triangulation (in simple terms).

'Fatalism' is essentially the belief of "what happens, happens" - it's fate! Fatalism is commonly used in education within sociology as it is suggested by some sociologists that it is 'inevitable' that some children will have a poor education, this is fatalism. It is also common to see it in education for studies relating to employment post-education. Some children may get a poor education because they don't believe they will get a job after they finish school - they believe that it's 'inevitable' they will be unemployed so what's the point in getting good grades?

I'm assuming you mean 'Interactionism', this is more difficult to explain briefly as it is more of a 'viewpoint' than a definition. It is a 'bottom up' theory - they look at society as individuals and not society as a whole group. To understand this more I would look at a text book or ask your sociology teacher.

Hope this helps, feel free to PM me.
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Lukem14
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#4
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(Original post by bwilliams)
Hi Luke,

'Immediate gratification' is an opposing term of 'deferred gratification' - for example, if I was to recieve my pay at the end of the week and blow it there and then on a shopping spree, that would be immediate gratification - if I saved my pay over a period of 8 weeks to purchase something much more meaningful that I had wanted for sometime that would be deferred gratification. This can also be linked to a variety of situations including education, revising over periods of time to get good grades would be deferred gratification as you are working hard over a long period of time to get a reward. In contrast, not revising and watching the TV every night of the week would be immediate gratification as you are being rewarded immediately (if you see watching TV a reward).

'Triangulation' is related to methodology - you will usually see this in research methods. This is where sociologists may dip into different methods or different views to test for the same result. This is suggested to improve validitiy (how 'valid' a study is). Sociologists will usually be in favour of specific research methods but where useful will dip into others to check their work. This is essentially triangulation (in simple terms).

'Fatalism' is essentially the belief of "what happens, happens" - it's fate! Fatalism is commonly used in education within sociology as it is suggested by some sociologists that it is 'inevitable' that some children will have a poor education, this is fatalism. It is also common to see it in education for studies relating to employment post-education. Some children may get a poor education because they don't believe they will get a job after they finish school - they believe that it's 'inevitable' they will be unemployed so what's the point in getting good grades?

I'm assuming you mean 'Interactionism', this is more difficult to explain briefly as it is more of a 'viewpoint' than a definition. It is a 'bottom up' theory - they look at society as individuals and not society as a whole group. To understand this more I would look at a text book or ask your sociology teacher.

Hope this helps, feel free to PM me.
Thank you so much that helped a lot!
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