googie3
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How to see the peaks for C13 NMR.... ? Can somebody tell if there are 3 peaks in the range 0 to 50, howd we know they are ch2 or ch3?
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googie3
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Does this Ch2 give a singlet or a triplet?
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charco
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(Original post by googie3)
Does this Ch2 give a singlet or a triplet?
I assume that you are talking about 1H NMR, as there is no splitting in 13C NMR

Yes it will be a triplet, split by the neighbouring CH2 protons.
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googie3
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but the neighbouring have the same environment...
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charco
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(Original post by googie3)
but the neighbouring have the same environment...
Yeah, I didn't even look after the ch2 group. I rather assumed it was a CH3.

There is only a singlet for the CH2 groups and one for the OH groups...
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googie3
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How to be sure about the splitting pattern? I mean its so hard to define it as a singlet and not a triplet at first... Please help regarding this...
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limelitt
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(Original post by googie3)
How to be sure about the splitting pattern? I mean its so hard to define it as a singlet and not a triplet at first... Please help regarding this...
If you look at the whole molecule, you’ll see that the hydrogens in the two CH2 groups are equivalent, i.e. their chemical environments are exactly the same. This means there will be no interactions between them that would lead to splitting, and seeing as the adjacent OH hydrogen does not cause any extra splitting either, the peak will be a singlet.
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googie3
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(Original post by limelitt)
If you look at the whole molecule, you’ll see that the hydrogens in the two CH2 groups are equivalent, i.e. their chemical environments are exactly the same. This means there will be no interactions between them that would lead to splitting, and seeing as the adjacent OH hydrogen does not cause any extra splitting either, the peak will be a singlet.
So i get 2 peaks in total?(ignore the splitting)....
one peak for the Ch2 groups with integration 4
and one peak for the OH groups with integration 2 ?
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limelitt
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(Original post by googie3)
So i get 2 peaks in total?(ignore the splitting)....
one peak for the Ch2 groups with integration 4
and one peak for the OH groups with integration 2 ?
Yes, that’s correct.
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googie3
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How to see the peaks for C13 NMR.... ? if there are 3 peaks in the range 0 to 50, howd we know they are ch2 or ch3?
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