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Police trying to arrest innocent people? watch

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    Has anyone on here been in situation where the police have tried to arrest you for something that they didn't do my experiences with the police has been overwhelmingly positive but this story is from my brother (we'll call him Chris.)

    So Chris is wondering around down near Tesco's and this cop comes up to him and his is the exchange.

    Cop: Hi there what are you doing out tonight.
    Chris: Just buying some beer.
    Cop: So your not shop lifting?
    Chris **** no
    Cop: Stop swearing or I'll arrest you.
    Chris: Sorry
    Cop: So where are the goods
    Chris:What goods?
    Cop The goods you stole.
    Chris I didn't steal anything.
    Cop: Look we've got you on CCTV from last night.(Chris was with me in Reading the night in question)
    Chris: I wasn't even in Southampton last night

    They went around in circle like this for a few more minutes until this bit of the exchange .

    Chris:Look do you want the truth or do you want to hear what you want me to say.
    Cop: I want to hear both.

    At this point Chris's mates turned up backing up what he said. as he and his mates walk away the cop shouts after them.

    Cop: You can't get away with this forever.

    It seems to me that the police were trying to force Chris to confess He didn't do I understand doing their job but trying to force a confession like that lying about CCTV evidence seems bit unethical in this case the truth and what the cop wanted to hear were mutually exclusive.

    TLDR Cop tried to arrest Chris without any evidence his mates saved him.

    Has anyone else seen or had this happen to them?
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    On this side of the pond, cops are permitted to lie to suspects all the time, in an effort to secure a confession. This is often counter-productive, because if you solicit a false confession, it will come back to 'bite you' in the end. Police management and the local district attorney will not be amused by someone wasting their time in this way. Having too many 'failure to convict' cases is one way that the local DA may be asked to vacate their office, and find other employment. Often cases are dropped, or put in the 'inactive' file, because trying to prosecute may be deemed 'too risky' by the DA's boss. Remember that 'you only get one kick at the cat'. If you try someone for a particular crime, and they are acquitted, you can never try them again - even if postive proof becomes available (say DNA evidence), that conclusively ties them to the crime. Once you have convicted a police officer of extracting a confession by Illegitimate means, the flood gates open. Basically everyone that that cop ever had a hand in convicting of anything, is going to appeal, and it will cost the legal system millions. This sort of thing will REALLY get the cop & his superiors on the 'hot seat' for years.

    I suspect that the cops in question thought they saw a resembance to the fellow from the video recordings, and were 'trolling for a response'. Had the fellow exibited some signs of guilt - running, or appearing very nervious, the cop would probably have indulged in more detailed questioning. Eyewitness identifications are nortoriously uncertain and inaccurate. This is one reason that more technical means (DNA, fingerprints, other forensic analysis) have taken over most criminal investigations. In normal western society, there are statutory limits as to how long police can question a subject. After that period of time, they either have to charge the individual or release them. I feel that your best procedure is to initially co-operate with the investigator. Do not volunteer anything, and if they start getting serious, just tell them you want a lawyer, and don't want to talk to them further without council - and stick to it!! They will try to get you to keep talking, but if you stick to your statement, they have to comply. Best of luck.
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    Had it loads of times. My experiences with the police have not been great, really.
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    I've never experienced anything remotely close to this. Come to think of it, I don't think I've ever spoken to a police officer...

    I mean, I've seen reports on the news but I always dismissed them as unusual cases.
    (Original post by gjd800)
    Had it loads of times. My experiences with the police have not been great, really.
    ngl, honestly thought OP might be trolling until I saw ur post :eek:
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    (Original post by Lady Jamie)
    I've never experienced anything remotely close to this. Come to think of it, I don't think I've ever spoken to a police officer...

    I mean, I've seen reports on the news but I always dismissed them as unusual cases.

    ngl, honestly thought OP might be trolling until I saw ur post :eek:
    Spent way more time in the back of a meatwagon than I care to remember. All it takes round here is to drink in the worng places or know the wrong people. I've had several complaints upheld by the IPCC, actually :laugh:
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    (Original post by Rabbit2)
    On this side of the pond, cops are permitted to lie to suspects all the time, in an effort to secure a confession. This is often counter-productive, because if you solicit a false confession, it will come back to 'bite you' in the end. Police management and the local district attorney will not be amused by someone wasting their time in this way. Having too many 'failure to convict' cases is one way that the local DA may be asked to vacate their office, and find other employment. Often cases are dropped, or put in the 'inactive' file, because trying to prosecute may be deemed 'too risky' by the DA's boss. Remember that 'you only get one kick at the cat'. If you try someone for a particular crime, and they are acquitted, you can never try them again - even if postive proof becomes available (say DNA evidence), that conclusively ties them to the crime. Once you have convicted a police officer of extracting a confession by Illegitimate means, the flood gates open. Basically everyone that that cop ever had a hand in convicting of anything, is going to appeal, and it will cost the legal system millions. This sort of thing will REALLY get the cop & his superiors on the 'hot seat' for years.

    I suspect that the cops in question thought they saw a resembance to the fellow from the video recordings, and were 'trolling for a response'. Had the fellow exibited some signs of guilt - running, or appearing very nervious, the cop would probably have indulged in more detailed questioning. Eyewitness identifications are nortoriously uncertain and inaccurate. This is one reason that more technical means (DNA, fingerprints, other forensic analysis) have taken over most criminal investigations. In normal western society, there are statutory limits as to how long police can question a subject. After that period of time, they either have to charge the individual or release them. I feel that your best procedure is to initially co-operate with the investigator. Do not volunteer anything, and if they start getting serious, just tell them you want a lawyer, and don't want to talk to them further without council - and stick to it!! They will try to get you to keep talking, but if you stick to your statement, they have to comply. Best of luck.
    Wow, you really seem to know what you're talking about! Thanks for sharing an insight into crime, punishment, and police psychology.
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    happens plenty, you get a**hole cops, incompetent ones, downright evil ones....just like every other walk of life.

    In a sitaution like that all you can do is stick to your guns that they've got the wrong person and try not to escalte it.
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    I’ve been involved with the police once. As a 14 year old victim. The case ended with my laptop including GCSE coursework which I had to redo destroyed. Which was bad enough. The worse part was a threat from the police to prosecute and put me on the sex offenders register.... despite me self-harming and clearly being vulnerable.

    Needless to say when I was a victim of crime at 17 I didn’t report it
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    Police are are absolute c unts. There is this person I went to school with that was an absolute c unt and now they are in the police.
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    As likely as seeing 7ft tall folk. They exist but...


    As Robert Peel said ‘The public are the Police and the Police are the public’


    You get knobs in every walk of life. 99% are fine.
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    yes

    pls try to get me for murder , no evidence but they still questioned me

    got off scot free , **** corrupt elite people
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    Thing is you get people that confess even though they didnt do anything if they believe they'll get in more trouble by not confessing. That is the problem with police interrogation.
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    (Original post by Unistudent77)
    As likely as seeing 7ft tall folk. They exist but...


    As Robert Peel said ‘The public are the Police and the Police are the public’


    You get knobs in every walk of life. 99% are fine.
    Except knobs with power turn into even bigger knobs.
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    Yeah ive basically have been stopped a few times for overtaking police cars that dont actually know how to drive or follow rules that theyve make them selves (funny that) They seem to drive under the speed limit, and you have to overtake them, and it hurts their ego! You really have to stand your guard and know your stuff because they’ve been given an authoritative status and get all stuck up about it, once you let them know you the road rules and your civil rights etc they either react in one of two ways:

    1- either get defensive and try and arrest you or stop you, - which is where the fun starts and you can read the links ive added so you can see what to do next

    or

    2- actually are rather cool about it and leave you to carry on with your journey

    i've figured out that higher up they are the more chilled the policemen are (the older ones are better) the newer/lower down they are, the more defensive/angry they get.

    I had to argue and stand my ground at one point where I had to over take them as they were driving at 40mph on a 50mph road, since id done nothing wrong, and I did it safely, I argued and he tried to arrest and call back up, tell them a few laws and they back off, and leave you be, I was late for uni so made points, recorded the incident and made my way down lmao.
    Sometimes people get too scared of the cops and just accept what they say, but seriously, some of them take it wayyyy to far! My boyfriend worked for the MOD and hes taught me all this lmao

    https://www.gov.uk/arrested-your-rights

    https://www.gov.uk/police-powers-of-arrest-your-rights

    https://www.gov.uk/police-powers-to-...ch-your-rights

    the funny thing is that if they cant actually answer these and attempt to interrogate you, you can actually just say no, you don’t have a legal obligation to reply (unless youre actually in the wrong then fess up)

    it hurts their ego a bit when you know your civil rights, as long you haven't done anything wrong, youre not obliged to reply to them unless they give you a reasonable response

    im doing my advanced driving test soon and being taught by an former police man, he agrees with me totally :rofl:


    rant over :lol:
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    (Original post by CleverSquirrel)
    Yeah ive basically have been stopped a few times for overtaking police cars that dont actually know how to drive or follow rules that theyve make them selves (funny that) They seem to drive under the speed limit, and you have to overtake them, and it hurts their ego! You really have to stand your guard and know your stuff because they’ve been given an authoritative status and get all stuck up about it, once you let them know you the road rules and your civil rights etc they either react in one of two ways:

    1- either get defensive and try and arrest you or stop you, - which is where the fun starts and you can read the links ive added so you can see what to do next

    or

    2- actually are rather cool about it and leave you to carry on with your journey

    i've figured out that higher up they are the more chilled the policemen are (the older ones are better) the newer/lower down they are, the more defensive/angry they get.

    I had to argue and stand my ground at one point where I had to over take them as they were driving at 40mph on a 50mph road, since id done nothing wrong, and I did it safely, I argued and he tried to arrest and call back up, tell them a few laws and they back off, and leave you be, I was late for uni so made points, recorded the incident and made my way down lmao.
    Sometimes people get too scared of the cops and just accept what they say, but seriously, some of them take it wayyyy to far! My boyfriend worked for the MOD and hes taught me all this lmao

    https://www.gov.uk/arrested-your-rights

    https://www.gov.uk/police-powers-of-arrest-your-rights

    https://www.gov.uk/police-powers-to-...ch-your-rights

    the funny thing is that if they cant actually answer these and attempt to interrogate you, you can actually just say no, you don’t have a legal obligation to reply (unless youre actually in the wrong then fess up)

    it hurts their ego a bit when you know your civil rights, as long you haven't done anything wrong, youre not obliged to reply to them unless they give you a reasonable response

    im doing my advanced driving test soon and being taught by an former police man, he agrees with me totally :rofl:


    rant over :lol:
    A complaint that I had upheld was because I was (very temporarily) arrested for refusing to answer questions when there was no reasonable basis for the copper to stop me. I know not all bizzies, but some of them are a law unto themselves.
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    (Original post by gjd800)
    A complaint that I had upheld was because I was (very temporarily) arrested for refusing to answer questions when there was no reasonable basis for the copper to stop me. I know not all bizzies, but some of them are a law unto themselves.
    yeah they do that, and when you reufuse to say anything because its your right to, they get even more annoyed, they're not allowed to do that
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    Has anyone on here been in situation where the police have tried to arrest you for something that they didn't do my experiences with the police has been overwhelmingly positive but this story is from my brother (we'll call him Chris.)

    So Chris is wondering around down near Tesco's and this cop comes up to him and his is the exchange.

    Cop: Hi there what are you doing out tonight.
    Chris: Just buying some beer.
    Cop: So your not shop lifting?
    Chris **** no
    Cop: Stop swearing or I'll arrest you.
    Chris: Sorry
    Cop: So where are the goods
    Chris:What goods?
    Cop The goods you stole.
    Chris I didn't steal anything.
    Cop: Look we've got you on CCTV from last night.(Chris was with me in Reading the night in question)
    Chris: I wasn't even in Southampton last night

    They went around in circle like this for a few more minutes until this bit of the exchange .

    Chris:Look do you want the truth or do you want to hear what you want me to say.
    Cop: I want to hear both.

    At this point Chris's mates turned up backing up what he said. as he and his mates walk away the cop shouts after them.

    Cop: You can't get away with this forever.

    It seems to me that the police were trying to force Chris to confess He didn't do I understand doing their job but trying to force a confession like that lying about CCTV evidence seems bit unethical in this case the truth and what the cop wanted to hear were mutually exclusive.

    TLDR Cop tried to arrest Chris without any evidence his mates saved him.

    Has anyone else seen or had this happen to them?

    He got stopped cause...

    Everybody hates Chris.......
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    Once I got off the bus and started walking towards my house, ..i was walking at a leisurely place and looking at a few house whilst walking past. Out of nowhere two big burly men appear and accuse me of casing houses. They say they are undercover police officers. One of them then puts on these bright green/blue gloves and proceeds to search me. They are asking me all sorts of questions like where do i live, where am i going ....... it's flippin ridiculous


    There's been other times too.
    Half the time they actually didn't have a reason. They just show up in an area/street and start searching random black people as they walk past. I actually started crossing the road whenever i saw a bunch of police loitering on the street ......as i learned there was a decent probability they would just pull me aside and decide to search me for no reason
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    YES. story of my life, they know me by first name and face, i had to constantly leave town until I finally did time and my charges cleared and probation ended granted, I was guilty lol but they still try to pin **** on me and like catch me doing one little thing cos they cant catch me for other ****, so i left my hometown for good when they ambushed me in my house, with my family there, looking for me while i was in the shower. saying they were "just checking on me" :hmmm:.
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    Only time I've been arrested is for unknowingly assaulting an officer :rofl:
 
 
 
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