Is the academy trust scandal like the Thatcher rail privatization? Watch

username4344212
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https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...ham-holy-cross

The government has handed over 7,000 state schools in England to Academy Trusts since 2010. This is when a public asset built and maintained by generations of taxpayers will be gifted to a charitable trust to run as it wants.

What's wrong with academies?

  • They set staff pay and conditions so are not inline with union and expert advice
  • They dictate how long pupils must stay each day
  • Executives will also control the site and could sell school land
  • Some executives took big financial liberties, paying themselves far in excess of what a local authority head could earn, and spending taxpayer cash on services provided by companies linked to themselves or family members.
  • There have been too few checks on schools wanting to become academies
  • Trusts haven’t had to prove themselves before taking on new schools in difficult straits


Academies have been a jewel in the education policy crown for both Labour and Conservative governments in the past 25 years.

But although the Labour government hugely talked up its academies programme, there were only around 200 of them – 1% of all English schools – by the time it left office in 2010.

It was Michael Gove, the incoming Conservative education secretary, who put turbo boosters under the policy. By the time he left the job in 2014, the number had rocketed to almost six in 10 secondary schools, and one in five primaries.
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J Papi
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What were the alleged benefits of academies?
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by just_fake_news)
https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...ham-holy-cross

The government has handed over 7,000 state schools in England to Academy Trusts since 2010. This is when a public asset built and maintained by generations of taxpayers will be gifted to a charitable trust to run as it wants.

What's wrong with academies?

[ul]
[li]They set staff pay and conditions so are not inline with union and expert advice[/li]
[li]They dictate how long pupils must stay each day[/li]
[li]Executives will also control the site and could sell school land[/li]
[li]Some executives took big financial liberties, paying themselves far in excess of what a local authority head could earn, and spending taxpayer cash on services provided by companies linked to themselves or family members.[/li]
[li]There have been too few checks on schools wanting to become academies[/li]
[li]Trusts haven’t had to prove themselves before taking on new schools in difficult straits[/li]
[/ul]

Academies have been a jewel in the education policy crown for both Labour and Conservative governments in the past 25 years.

But although the Labour government hugely talked up its academies programme, there were only around 200 of them – 1% of all English schools – by the time it left office in 2010.

It was Michael Gove, the incoming Conservative education secretary, who put turbo boosters under the policy. By the time he left the job in 2014, the number had rocketed to almost six in 10 secondary schools, and one in five primaries.
Tell me about the Thatcher rail privatisation. When did it happen? How did it end? I must have slept through it, because when John Major fought the 1992 general election, the railways were being run by a state monopoly called British Rail.
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username4344212
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Tell me about the Thatcher rail privatisation. When did it happen? How did it end? I must have slept through it, because when John Major fought the 1992 general election, the railways were being run by a state monopoly called British Rail.
Margaret Thatcher served as Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990. In 1982, British Rail passenger services were split into three core sectors: InterCity, NetworkSouthEast and Regional Railways.

This led the way to privatisation between 1994 and 1997 (when John Major was in power 1990-1997). Track and infrastructure passed to Railtrack in 1994 and, later, passenger services were franchised in 25 blocks to private-sector operators. Freight services were sold outright. Overall, ownership and operation of the network became highly fragmented, as operations were split between more than 100 companies.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by just_fake_news)
In 1982, British Rail passenger services were split into three core sectors: InterCity, NetworkSouthEast and Regional Railways.

.
Replacing the six regions into which British Rail had been split since 1948. Those sectors were dismantled by the Major government in order to privatise the railway. Thatcher had nothing whatsoever to do with railway privatisation.
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