Is English or history necessary for law in uni?

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Ziyad123
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I am currently choosing my a levels in order to do law in the future. My desired a levels were: maths, history, computing and psychology, however the sixth form that I want to attend has a maximum of 700 study hours, but my proposed a levels has 780 hours of study time. Because of this, I was thinking of changing history for something else but I have read that universities like the applicants to have done a level history or english (or both). So my question is, is it important for me to have history as an a level in order to do law, or can I drop it and pick something else (not english) while still retaining a good chance of getting into a good uni? Thanks.
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by Ziyad123)
I am currently choosing my a levels in order to do law in the future. My desired a levels were: maths, history, computing and psychology, however the sixth form that I want to attend has a maximum of 700 study hours, but my proposed a levels has 780 hours of study time. Because of this, I was thinking of changing history for something else but I have read that universities like the applicants to have done a level history or english (or both). So my question is, is it important for me to have history as an a level in order to do law, or can I drop it and pick something else (not english) while still retaining a good chance of getting into a good uni? Thanks.
If you want to do law, I would heavily recommend keeping history and dropping either computing or psychology. (Personally I would drop computing). This is for a few reasons:

1) Studying law at university will involve writing lots of essays - essays are how you will be assessed. Studying an essay subject such as History at A-level teaches you how to construct an argument and think critically about sources of information. These skills are essential for a law degree. How will you develop and prove that you have these skills without taking History?

2) Neither Computing or Psychology will benefit you if you want to study law, especially not computing. Furthermore, they are not facilitating subjects - they are simply not as well-regarded as traditional academic subjects like History. Many universities recommend that you take at least 2 facilitating subjects - if you did maths, computing and psychology you would only have 1. Your application will be far stronger, and far more likely to get you into a good law school, if you take Maths, History and either computing or psychology.

3) You don't need 4 A-levels. Far better to do 3 A-levels in better subjects, than 4 A-levels in weak, easier subjects.
Last edited by LeapingLucy; 1 year ago
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Ziyad123
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
If you want to do law, I would heavily recommend keeping history and dropping either computing or psychology. (Personally I would drop computing). This is for a few reasons:

1) Studying law at university will involve writing lots of essays - essays are how you will be assessed. Studying an essay subject such as History at A-level teaches you how to construct an argument and think critically about sources of information. These skills are essential for a law degree. How will you develop and prove that you have these skills without taking History?

2) Neither Computing or Psychology will benefit you if you want to study law, especially not computing. Furthermore, they are not facilitating subjects - they are simply not as well-regarded as traditional academic subjects like History. Many universities recommend that you take at least 2 facilitating subjects - if you did maths, computing and psychology you would only have 1. Your application will be far stronger, and far more likely to get you into a good law school, if you take Maths, History and either computing or psychology.

3) You don't need 4 A-levels. Far better to do 3 A-levels in better subjects, than 4 A-levels in weak, easier subjects.
I think I will choose maths, psychology and history along with EPQ. I'll still think about it for a day or two, but I think that these a levels seem good for law. Thank you for the reply.
Also, do you think that I'd benefit by picking law over psychology? Thanks.
Last edited by Ziyad123; 1 year ago
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artful_lounger
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They aren't required as far as admission goes, but they may be helpful as LeapingLucy noted. Students can and do get accepted on to law courses with full sets of STEM A-levels however - I've no data on how well they perform compared to those who took one or more essay subjects (might be an interesting prospect for FoI requests...).

To extend the comments on facilitating subjects, such subjects are designated as such because they are required prerequisites for one or more degree programmes. Neither A-level Computer Science nor Psychology are normally required to pursue those subjects at uni, and aren't usually required for other subjects. Thus, A-level History/Maths plus another gives you more options if you do change your mind and wish to pursue something other than law.

As an aside, for CS specifically the majority of courses neither expect nor require any background in programming or computing, and typically the only requirement is a good background in maths (to A-level or equivalent). Similarly for law there is no expectation students have taken A-level Law, and most law schools indicate there is no particular benefit in taking it due to the differences in how it's taught and how quickly the overlapping material does get covered in the degree (the A-level seems more a blend of law and socio-legal studies). For psychology there are usually no requirements although often a STEM subject is preferred or sometimes required - this will almost always include A-level Maths and often inlcudes A-level Psychology, so you should qualify for any courses preferring a STEM subject with A-level Maths by itself anyway.
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