jokhasaid
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Describe the mechanism of glucose reabsorption into the blood from the lumen of the proximal convoluted tubule of the kidney
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ceza56
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How many marks? I think it would just be diffusion and talk about high to low concn gradient
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anosmianAcrimony
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(Original post by ceza56)
How many marks? I think it would just be diffusion and talk about high to low concn gradient
Nah, you don't just want to equalise concentrations of glucose between urine and blood - you want to get as much sugar back into the blood as you possibly can. I suspect there is active transport involved and maybe some more complicated, sneaky processes going on. OP, I recommend you crack an A-Level biology textbook. It'll be in there.
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ceza56
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(Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
Nah, you don't just want to equalise concentrations of glucose between urine and blood - you want to get as much sugar back into the blood as you possibly can. I suspect there is active transport involved and maybe some more complicated, sneaky processes going on. OP, I recommend you crack an A-Level biology textbook. It'll be in there.
That makes more sense tbf, I think it is actively transported actually !! You are more than likely right
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usycool1
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(Original post by jokhasaid)
Describe the mechanism of glucose reabsorption into the blood from the lumen of the proximal convoluted tubule of the kidney
What level is this at? I'd talk about sodium co-transport/secondary active transport.
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BobbJo
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(Original post by jokhasaid)
Describe the mechanism of glucose reabsorption into the blood from the lumen of the proximal convoluted tubule of the kidney
Fluid in the filtrate entering the proximal convoluted tubule is reabsorbed into the peritubular capillaries. This is driven by sodium transport from the lumen into the blood by the Na+/K+ ATPase in the basolateral membrane of the epithelial cells.

Firstly, the glucose in the proximal tubule is co-transported with sodium ions into the proximal convoluted tubule walls via the SGLT2 cotransporter. Some (typically smaller) amino acids are also transported in this way. Once in the tubule wall, the glucose and amino acids diffuse directly into the blood capillaries along a concentration gradient. This blood is flowing, so the gradient is maintained. Lastly, sodium/potassium ion active transport pumps remove sodium from the tubule wall and the sodium is put back into the blood. This maintains a sodium concentration gradient in the proximal tubule lining, so the first step continues to happen.
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