Yeepitsyellow
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Yeehee...
Hi peeps- I'm SHy (a mix betwen my name and my favourite colour...don't judge) and this really is a last attempt at trying to motivate myself to revise, and using this as a tool for revision. I'm hoping to post a few quick check questions here after each day, where I'll challenge myself to write a comprehensive answer - revising and holding myself accountable to you peeps. I do tend to get really stressed over the most minute things and hence I find myself in a cafuffle most days. So, I'm also hoping to use this as a platform where I can detress; this won't just be me bombarding you with all my worries, and I will let you in on thise moments that just make me happy to be me!

My A-levels
Sociology
History
Psychology

My predicted grades are AAA - scary just looking at it, but that's life I suppose.

University choices
So, recieved conditional offers from all of my places, but I've chosen University of Leeds as my firm and University of Huddersfiled for insurance, and I'm applying to Law.


How I revise
I basically pretend to teach a class of imaginary students on my whiteboards, but lately I've started teaching my reflection in the mirror, which is suprisingly working really well. It feels like I'm actually teaching a person, which is great becuase my family and friends get anoyed with me babbling on about why corporate crime is invisible in society...

And... that's it (a bit short..)
If you have any questions about revision methods, the colour yellow, what I'm finding difficult, the colour yellow, exam techniques etc, pop me a question and I'll gladly answer it. I know it can be frutraing when no one seems to have the anser and the same generic revision methods are recomended, which you may have tried and tested a million times but just don't work for you...I'm not saying I'm all-knowing but I may be able to suggest something new.

Thanks!


yelllooooowwwww
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nyxnko_
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Good luck!! :rave:
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Yeepitsyellow
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(Original post by nyxnko_)
Good luck!! :rave:
Thanks! I'm going to be honest with you, I was going to convince myself I was too tired to do this whole revisison thing on TSR but then I saw your reply and I was MOTIVATED - Bless you peep! BTW - do you use the TSR app or websitee to reply/post here becuase I downloaded the app and it really lagged...
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nyxnko_
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(Original post by Yeepitsyellow)
Thanks! I'm going to be honest with you, I was going to convince myself I was too tired to do this whole revisison thing on TSR but then I saw your reply and I was MOTIVATED - Bless you peep! BTW - do you use the TSR app or websitee to reply/post here becuase I downloaded the app and it really lagged...
haha, glad I motivated you :woo:
and personally, I prefer the website (on a laptop) :yes: the app is convenient but it's not really great and crashes a bit sometimes :dontknow: plus, editing posts is a huge pain on the app
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Yeepitsyellow
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Right....Here goes! i'm posting my revision questions below, which I'll answer in about 20 minutes, and hopefully that is a good form of recall...Better be...

American History
1) What was the population of Chicago in 1850 and in in 1890?
2) What did the rise in the immigration population in cities lead to?
3) What is the boss system? Use the example of Tammany Hall
4) Describe the Tammany Hall scandal.
5) What was the union paciifc scandal?
6) What was the New York Custom House scandal?
7) What was the Whiskey Ring scandal?
8) Describe some pull and push factors for immigration in the USA?
9) What is Nativism and give some examples to support your answer.

1) Descibe the experience of African Americans (AA) in the North.
2) Describe the experience of AA in the South.
3) Describe the experience of AA after reconstruction

1) What is Manifest Destiny?
2) Describe the pull and push factors for moving West?
3) Descibe the three atcs that contributed to Westwards expansion
4) How did the Pacific Railroad Act of 1862 affect the Native Americans and contribute to Westwards expansion?
5) Describe the first and second gold rush
6) Describe the six events that lead to the eventual wiping out of the Native Americans. (Hint: 1864 start to 1890 end)

Actually, I might answer these tomorrow in the morning, and just consolidate my revision instead with a related video, or some flashcards etc....I guess we'll find out soon
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Yeepitsyellow
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(Original post by nyxnko_)
haha, glad I motivated you :woo:
and personally, I prefer the website (on a laptop) :yes: the app is convenient but it's not really great and crashes a bit sometimes :dontknow: plus, editing posts is a huge pain on the app
Yeah... I realised the app wasn't for me after my phone crahsed FOUR times!
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(Original post by Yeepitsyellow)
Yeah... I realised the app wasn't for me after my phone crahsed FOUR times!
:console: awwww
hope the revision went well :woo:
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Elizabeth II
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Hello!!!

Good luck with your GYG journey
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Yeepitsyellow
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(Original post by nyxnko_)
:console: awwww
hope the revision went well :woo:
Well...I made a few flascards and went over them today, which was better than I expected, and unfortunately I didn't get up in the morning to answer the questions becuase I was just so tired. You know that feeling where you just want to stay in bed forever? Yop....it was one of those So, I'm just going to answer those questions now...and maybe watch a small video on my British History revision becuase that was seriously confuzzling!
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Yeepitsyellow
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(Original post by Paracosm)
Hello!!!

Good luck with your GYG journey
Thanks peep!
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Yeepitsyellow
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Right, so I was going to answer my questions now and upload them onto here, but I din't get time finish it off, so I'll do it tomorrow....Lazyyyy....
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Yeepitsyellow
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Nop!!!! I need to do it! I've managed to answer the questions I write a few days ago, I'm going to post my new questions for me to answer tomorrow based on today's revision session, make somw quick flashcards on the last few questions about Native Americans that I was honestly cluelesssabout...THEN I'm going to quickly apply for a journalist position for Dina Tokio...Yoooopppp!!! And THEN, I'm off to sleep!
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Yeepitsyellow
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Underlined = confused or don’t know the answer.

American History

1) What was the population of Chicago in 1850 and in in 1890?

1850 = 30,000

1890 = over a million


2) What did the rise in the immigration population in cities lead to?
It led to the quick construction of poor-quality housing, and then slums. Those with experience on running an industrial city left to the suburbs due to the large influx of immigrants and ‘Bosses’ took control as ‘mayors’.



3) What is the boss system? Use the example of Tammany Hall

The boss system is where there is a ‘boss’ that acts as the mayor of the city and controls. Associations run by bosses provide to the immigrants/new arrivals what the government doesn’t such as welfare, healthcare, jobs etc. People owe their jobs to the boss. Building contractors etc doing jobs in this city pay large amounts of money to the boss, and the highest bidder is chosen by the boss to conduct jobs (e.g. building of schools). The boss can also receive kickbacks, which are acts of keeping secrets of the boss hidden or hiding a scandal and being paid large amounts of money as well. Tammany Hall was an example of such an association, led by William Tweed.

4) Describe the Tammany Hall scandal.

Tammany Hall used bribery, rigged elections and trickery etc to take from the city $?million. Political cartoonist Nast presented to the mostly illiterate immigrants what Tweed had been doing to them and refused when asked to stop his campaign against Tweed. Tweed fled to Spain but was captured and extradited back to America, where he later died in jail.




5) What was the union pacific scandal?


The directors of Union pacific (built railways and trains) had been transferring government money to Credit Mobiliere, another company they had, and then claimed they had no money. They repeated this until eventually Union pacific became bankrupt and all the investors of this company lost their money.



6) What was the New York Custom House scandal?

The New York Custom House controlled commerce into New York, and were paid bribes to allow the undervaluing of imports to Occur, in order for lower taxes to be placed on goods and thus for more profit to be produced.



7) What was the Whiskey Ring scandal?


A network of whiskey distillers, distributors and public officials were accused making plans to illegally obtain millions of dollars in liquor tax revenue, by lying about the strength of liquor in order to lower the tax they had to pay on it.

8) Describe some pull and push factors for immigration in the USA?

Pull = Advertisements on railways etc described America as a ‘golden country’. They spoke of religious tolerance, economic opportunities and political freedom.

Push = Economic depression – famine in Ireland, religious persecution – Jews were escaping the pogroms in Russia and new economic opportunities – jobs etc.




9) What is Nativism and give some examples to support your answer.
This is the act of trying to protect the native-born Americans from the interests of the immigrants. Some examples of this are shown through nativist agitation: trade unions thought immigrants were a threat to organised labour and occupied the job spaces reserved for Americans. Social reformers thought that immigrants worsened city problems – Italians were seen to be involved in organised crime, scots were seen to be mean, and the Irish were seen to be drunkards. ?



1) Describe the experience of African Americans (AA) in the North.

They didn’t face legal separation but still suffered from discrimination: the first ghetto was set up in in Harlem in the 1880s. They faced poor education, limited employment opportunities and poor housing quality. The movement of AA to the North highlighted the racial tension and the racism from White Americans.


2) Describe the experience of AA in the South.

Here, they occupied high income jobs such as constructing railways etc. However, many AA remained sharecroppers where they were encouraged by their White landlords/’masters’ to continue to produce cotton and tobacco – they suffered greatly with the attack of the Boll Weevil insect in ?. AA faced legal segregation from the Jim Crow laws that preached the idea of ‘separate but evil’. Many White Americans felt that separation would avoid bloodshed via racial tension and encourage peace.


3) Describe the experience of AA after reconstruction


After reconstruction, there was a decrease in the interests of AA and the Gilded age witnesses the highest amount of lynching’s of AA.

1) What is Manifest Destiny?


The belief that Americans have the God given right to populate the American land, spread Republican and Christian values and to civilise the Native Americans (NA). The term was first created by John O’Sullivan who created a racial doctrine that justified the taking over of NA land.


2) Describe the pull and push factors for moving West?


Push = A new start, ????

Pull = Fertile land, the discovery of Gold in 1848, advertisements



3) Describe the three acts that contributed to Westwards expansion
a) Homestead Act of 1862 – This gave homesteaders 160 acres fir free on the basis that they were farmed for five years.

b) ???? - This gave homesteaders an additional 160 acres for free on the basis that they planted 25% of it with trees.

c) Desert and Land Act 1877 – This gave homesteaders an additional ???? acres at $1.25 each provided some of it was irrigated.



4) How did the Pacific Railroad Act of 1862 affect the Native Americans and contribute to

Westwards expansion?

This allowed the building of a transcontinental railroad that would run through NA lands, disturbing Buffalo herds, which the NA way of life was based on. The railway company were given land by the government to cover the cost of the process, and these companies attracted settlers to the lands with ‘buy now, pay later’ schemes’.



5) Describe the first and second gold rush
First = 1848, golds in ???? brought 300,000 settlers to the West

Second = 187?, gold discovered in the Black Hills of Dakota, brought many settlers to the lands. However, in the treaty of Laramie In 1868, the Dakota Lands had been given to the NA, but the government did not try to stop the settlers.



6) Describe the six events that lead to the eventual wiping out of the Native Americans. (Hint: 1864 start to 1890 end)

a) Treaty of Laramie 1868 - the Dakota Lands had been given to the NA.

b) Sand creek massacre ???? – Members of the army had been placed in the areas where the Sioux and Cheyenne tribes were known to be hostile to the white settlers, in order to protest them. The outbreak of the Civil War in 1861 meant that ill disciplined volunteers replaced the military members, and soon hundreds of innocent NA were killed.

c) ????

d) ????

e) ????

f) ????
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Yeepitsyellow
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British History
What new working conditions did women face in WW1?

What were the results of the war for women?

What was the 1918 respresntataion of the people act?

What was the miners strike of 1921?

What cultural chnages can be shown through children and churches?
How did patriotism affect the war effort etc?
What were conscientous objectors and in what clause etc did they first make an appearacne?

What 3 types of reason could someone be a CO for? What happened to the 16,00 COs?What did a white feather symbloise?

What kind of things did soldiers face in the treanches?What did soldiers suffer from during the War?Name a poem written during WW1

What was the response of the Irish to WW1?

Explain the events of the Easter UprisingWhat were the results of the Easter Uprising?What did Lloyd George do to deal with the Easter Uprising?

How did the rise of Sinn Fein occur, and what did they create in Irleand?Who were the Black and Tans and what did they do; Bloody Sunday 1921?

Describe te terms of the Anglo-Irsih Treaty of 1921.Did the treaty resove the problems or worsen it and why?
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Yeepitsyellow
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British History
What new working conditions did women face in WW1?

They faced longer hours, danger from the munitions they were produced, over 100 died in shell explosions, they did get paid more than they would as a domestic worker but still less than a man doing the same job. Over 1 million women entered the workforce, and by 1918, they made up 1/3 of the workforce.

What were the results of the war for women?

Their presence in the war effort/jobs did challenge the idea that women were weak and irrational, but there was still the notion that they should be keeping the ‘home fires burning’ as a good housewife instead. Women were still paid less than a man doing the same job, many women returned back to being a housewife/previous occupation, and my 1921, the number of women in the workforce was not that different from the amount in 1911. However, they did benefit from the 1919 sex disqualification act, where it was forbidden to exclude women from a career in Law/civil service.

What was the 1918 representation of the people act?

All men over 21 could vote, and those men over 19 who had been serving in the war could vote in the next election. Women over 30 could vote if they were a private property owner, or if they were a member of the local government register, were married to one, or if they were a graduate voting in university elections. Those younger W/C women who had been active during the war were given the right t0 vote in 1928.

What was the miners strike of 1921?

After the war, the government was no longer in control of the coal mines; the owners therefore raised the working hours and lowered the wages. Miners went on a national strike, and there was a possibility of a general strike when they were joined by the railway and docks workers. Lloyd George stopped this potential alliance, and on the last moment, the railway and docks workers retreated. The miners striked alone until July, and when they returned many face wage cuts that meant their wage was 20% lower than the pre-war wage.

What cultural changes can be shown through children and churches?

Children = many of their young teacher went to fight in the war. Many W/C children left school early to help with the war effort through working. Around 400,000 children grew up in lone parent households.

Church = was called upon for burial series, sermons etc. The opoe tried to act as a mediator between the two opposing camps.


How did patriotism affect the war effort etc?

Businesses stressed the britishness of their products and the symbol of the British bulldog showed the strength of Britain.

1 million men signed up to the war, but this wasn’t enough, and so the Conscription Act was assed in 1916.


What were conscientous objectors and in what clause etc did they first make an appearance?

The conscience clause in the Conscription Act on 1916 allowed some men to be exempt from fighting in the war.

What 3 types of reason could someone be a CO for?

Moral reasons, religious reasons and political reasons (member of the left and feeling that W/C people would suffer the most from the war)



What happened to the 16,00 COs?

10,000 agreed to do other work for the government such as driving ambulances, and nearly 6,000 were imprisoned because they refused to take part in the war effort, and were called ‘absolutists’.



What did a white feather symbolise?
Cowardice.


What kind of things did soldiers face in the trenches?

Rats, lice, diseases, cold, poor sanitation, they risked explosions and attack if they left the trench. What did soldiers suffer from during the War? Shell shock, amputated limbs, disease etc – 750,000 died and 2 million were injured



Name a poem written during WW1
Dulce et Decorum est by Wilfred Owen


What was the response of the Irish to WW1?
Both sides (nationalists and unionists) took part in the war effort. Some members of the Irish nationalists refused and formed a group led by MacNeil; a minority from this group planned an Easter Uprising.


Explain the events of the Easter Uprising.

They took control of the post office in Dublin, and posted signed proclamation that said that …. However, there was little support for their actions outside Dublin, and soon they were caught.



What were the results of the Easter Uprising?

A total of 15 people were shot, and 150,000 who were directly/indirectly involved were arrested and many sent to prison in Britain without trial. There were disagreements in Britain about the harsh treatment of the Irish, and there were calls to resolve the issue.



What did Lloyd George do to deal with the Easter Uprising?

He came up with the Heads of Agreement, where the 26 counties of South Ireland would have independence from Britain, and the 6 counties of the North(ulster) would remain in a union with Britain. However, Sinn Fein rejected this deal.

How did the rise of Sinn Fein occur, and what did they create in Ireland?

????, they created the Assembly of Ireland, where Ireland was an independent Ireland Republic. They refused to send MPs to Westminster, and instead sent their own delegates to the Paris peace conference. The Irish nationalists became the Irish Republic Army (IRA), and set out on a campaign to stop a union with Britain.



What did Sinn Fein create in Ireland?

They created the Assembly of Ireland called 'Dail Eeirann' which was called the only legislative body in Ireland, and the whole of Ireland was deemed as an Independent country ????. Sinn Fein refused to send MPs to Westminster and instead sent their own delegates to the Pars Peace conference. The Irish Nationalists changed to the IRA and were dedicated at creating Irish independence.



Who were the Black and Tans and what did they do on Bloody Sunday 1921?

They were British force that aimed to oppose the IRA. On Bloody Sunday 1921, the IRA dragged 11 citizens from their homes, who were suspected of being spies for the British, and shot them on the streets. Later that afternoon, the Black and Tans randomly shot into the Gaelic football players and the crowd. 12 people were killed and 60 were injured.



What was the reaction to Bloody Sunday 1921?

The actions of the British were condemned and there were calls from the King, Pope and L.O.N to come to a peaceful resolution.



Describe the terms of the Anglo-Irish treaty.

Northern Ireland would remain in a union with Britain - Lloyd George convinced the Unionists that this would be permanent, whilst telling Sinn Fein that this would be temporary and that soon the whole of Ireland would be independent. The North would have their own administration etc. The South would be an independent Dominion of Britain - they would have their own government etc, but Britain would have control over their defence, foreign policy, their ports would be used as Naval bases during wartime etc.



Did the Anglo-Irish treaty improve or worsen the relations in Ireland?

Sinn Fein and a few others rejected the treaty and there was a civil war between the pro and anti treaty sections of the party. Armed resistance and the civil war officially stopped in 1923. however, there were still tensions amongst the North and the South.
&
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Yeepitsyellow
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So, I'm a bit miffed becuase the flashards about NA for my American History didn't go into my head..I think it's becuase I'm finding it hard to visualise the events so I can't seem to grasp it. I'm definitely going to have to watch a video/mini dosucmntary about the taking over of Native American lands.... I'm also not going to lie; I haven't spken much about any tests etc becuase TBH I'm really nervous. I have a sociology exam next week Monday and there's the expectation that I'm going to do realy well becuase I've been getting good results in my essays for hmk...but these have been done ten minutes over the timings I'm supposed to write it in and I feel like this is going to add up, and I'm going to run out of time. I'm really not feeling good about it at all....but we'll see
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Yeepitsyellow
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Give two statistics about the male offenders in comparison to female offenders etc.

What is the Chivalry Thesis?

Give two supporting pieces of evidence for the chivalry thesis.

Provide three limitations of the Chivalry thesis.

What is the functional sex role theory?

Provide some limitations of the sex role theory.

What three types of control does Heidensohn discuss and explain them.

What are Carlen’s class and gender deals?

What are some limitations against Carlen and Heidensohn?

What is Adler’s liberation thesis?

What is the evidence for the liberation theory?

What 4 limitations are there against the liberation theory?

How does Young explain growing female criminality?

What is meant by the moral panic of girls as criminals?

Describe the link between fear of victimisation and actual victimisation for females and males.

What does Messerchendt argue that masculinity is?

What is hegemonic masculinity?

What is subordinated masculinity?

How can subordinated masculinity be shown with White M/C youths, white W/C youths and Black lower W/C youths?

…………And I need to go over male crime again because I didn’t have time to go over it properly….I just got stressed that I wasn’t going to finish it all of in time, so I just rushed the last part….oops!
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What were your GCSE results?
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What were your GCSE results?
Hi! I got 3 A*, 6 As and one B in French BTW, do you know how to tag people on a thread?
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Give two statistics about the male offenders in comparison to female offenders etc.

4/5 offenders for serious crime are male and 95% of prisoners are male.



What is the Chivalry Thesis?

This is the idea that the police have been socialised to behave chivalrously to women and so when they come across a woman who has done an offence, they either let her off or give her a warning, instead of arresting her. Therefore, crime statistics are inaccurate as thy don’t account for unreported female crime.



Give two supporting pieces of evidence for the chivalry thesis.

From analysing self-report studies, Paige et al found that fewer women who said they had committed a crime had actually been convicted for it, but it was not like this for men, suggesting the chivalry theory can account for why the women were not arrested etc.

Women are likely to be given a fine/community service, rather than face imprisonment for their crime and 1/9 women compared to 1/5 men are convicted for shoplifting.



Provide three limitations of the Chivalry thesis.

Farris and Morrington did not find any evidence for the chivalry thesis. A lot of male crime is not convicted either: A found suffers 35 assaults before she tells the police and Dobash and Dobash found that a woman is as risk of DV if her partner sees her to be avoiding her domestic duties, and money allowances can be used as a form of control, where without it, some women cannot do leisure opportunities and so are at a lower risk of committing a crime.

Heidensohn found that women are judged for ‘double deviance’ – for deviating against the law and deviating against the gender stereotypes and expectation for women. She found that Scottish judges were more likely to give a custodial sentence to those girls whose parents thought they were out of control, rather than those girls who conformed to traditional gender roles. Women were judged by how well they met the requirements of being a mother, wife, daughter etc. Carlen similarly found that in care homes, girls who were sexually active were referred for intervention, but the same did not happen for sexually active boys, suggesting double standards as well as double deviance that girls go through.



What is the functional sex role theory?

Women play the expressive role, socialising the children and being a housewife, and the man plays the instrumental role as a breadwinner. The children therefore have the mother as a role model, who is gentle and caring etc. The boys reject this female model of behaviour and look for compensatory compulsory masculinity though joining street gangs or performing aggressive and antisocial behaviour which can lead to crime and deviance. However, the girls look up to this female model of behaviour and take on the caring and gentle characteristics. They don’t have the aggressive and competitive characteristics that can lead to crime and deviance, so they are at a lower risk of committing criminal behaviour.



Provide some limitations of the sex role theory.

Feminists argue that just because a woman has the biological ability to have children, it doesn’t mean she has to perform the expressive role. Whilst Pearson attempts to explain gender differences in sex, he bases this on biological differences between the sexes.



What three types of control does Heidensohn discuss and explain them.

Control at home – girls are pressured to stay at home rather than going out and as such they develop a bedroom culture where they converse with their friends rather than seeing them This lowers their risk of committing a crime in the streets where they are more visible to the authorities. Control at work – women are in fear of sexual harassment at work which keeps them in their place and stops them from applying got more senior positions. The ‘glass ceiling’ at work prevents them from getting more senior positions due to low promotion opportunities etc which lowers their chances of committing corporate crime. Control in public – women are in fear of sexual assault; the Islington survey showed that 54% of women compared to 14% of men were scared of going outside in the dark due to fear of attack. Furthermore, the media exaggerated the rate of rape etc – 46% of crimes are said to be rapes in the media, but they only make up 3% of all crimes. This is designed to keep women in the home. Women fear their reputation being ruined if they go to pubs/dance clubs where they may be insulted etc for their clothing. All the above keep women in the home where they are at a lower risk of committing crime and are away for the attention of the authorities.



What are Carlen’s class and gender deals?

These are actions that provide a reward on completion. The class gender deal requires that a woman works to receive a wage which can open up leisure opportunities and material goods. The gender deal requires that women conform to their gender role as a wife/housewife etc which will earn them material rewards from their husbands. When the reward for these deals are not adequate enough, it means crime and deviance is more likely to occur. In Carlen's saml;l study of W/C women who had criminal convictions, she found that most of the women had suffered from sexual abuse from their fathers/partners, and that they found employment difficult - those with qualifications struggled with finding a job. These women saw that the rewards from committing crime were greater than the risks and they felt that employment/family had let them down.

What are some limitations against Carlen and Heidensohn?

Carlen's sample was small and is therefore unrepresentative as the women in her sample all had criminal convictions. Heidensohn shows women to be puppets, who are shaped by their external circumstances....????



What is Adler’s liberation thesis?

This is that as women become more free and independent from the patriarchal society, they have greater opportunities to commit crime. For example, as women have greater freedom to work, they have the chance to take up senior positions in employment, and hence to commit corporate crime.



What is the evidence for the liberation theory?

Denscombe found that there was a rise in a 'ladette' culture and of female gangs, where members would carry out more 'masculine' crimes such as gang membership, murder etc.



What 4 limitations are there against the liberation theory?

Female rise rose before the women's liberation movement and W/C women are least likely to be affected by such a movement. Chesney and Lind found that there was a rise of drug dealing amongst women but that this was usually due to their link to prostitution which is seen as an unliberated female crime. A sociologist found that female gang members in the USA were still expected to conform to traditional gender stereotypes in the same way as non-devant girls.



How does Young explain growing female criminality?

There is a 'doubling deviance up' where those small crimes that females tend to do such as shoplifting are being targeted increasingly and are being punished more harshly - this suggests that female crime is rising but this is not necessarily the case.



What is meant by the moral panic of girls as criminals?

The media portrays girls as being out of control, which encourages the police and the CJS take a tougher stance on female offenders and female offences, which inevitably leads to more female crime being reported and detected, which confirms the media stereotype and moral panic......



Describe the link between fear of victimisation and actual victimisation for females and males.

Females have a greater fear of being attacked but this is not in proportion to the risk they are - the Islington survey found that 54% of women and only 14% of men have a fear of going out at night for fear of being attacked, despite men being at a greater risk.... 70% of homicide victims are men and female victims are likely to know the perpetrator.



What does Messerchendt argue that masculinity is?

A social construct ...????





What is hegemonic masculinity?

This is the dominant form of masculinity that is based on the subordination of women and .....????





What is subordinated masculinity?

This is the subordinate form of masculinity where there are blocked opportunities to achieve the education and ...????





How can subordinated masculinity be shown with White M/C youths, white W/C youths and Black

lower W/C youths?

---------need to go over again



…………And I need to go over male crime again because I didn’t have time to go over it properly….I just got stressed that I wasn’t going to finish it all of in time, so I just rushed the last part….oops!



You know what…I’m actually really fed up all of this…is it even working or am I just wasting my time…I just feel like a robot doing routine stuff - I guess that’s life…or is it?
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