Gracegrapecherry
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Hello!

Normally, I cram revision a lot and this method has been working for me for few years but now that I'm doing GCSEs I don't think it is a method I should be too reliant on so I started to review notes and topics we've learnt before but I'm finding it difficult to find a method to do it. For the past week or so, I've just been reading my notes but it seems to go through one ear and right out the other but I'm not quite sure how exactly would be the best method of reviewing. If anyone wants to share their method or how they review, I would be eternally grateful. Thank you!
1
reply
_Mia101
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by Gracegrapecherry)
Hello!

Normally, I cram revision a lot and this method has been working for me for few years but now that I'm doing GCSEs I don't think it is a method I should be too reliant on so I started to review notes and topics we've learnt before but I'm finding it difficult to find a method to do it. For the past week or so, I've just been reading my notes but it seems to go through one ear and right out the other but I'm not quite sure how exactly would be the best method of reviewing. If anyone wants to share their method or how they review, I would be eternally grateful. Thank you!
Okay, so which GCSEs are you doing. Different subjects have better ways of revising.

What you've been doing (reading your notes) is passive revision so it isn't always the best way of revision. It works for some people but there are always better ways.

Cramming does work though, like in some of my exams, (history, RS and Further Maths) I crammed the dates, facts, figures and formulas I needed, and it was fine.

However, the best thing is to make sure you have a solid understanding of the basis of the topic.

Are you in year 11 or year 10?

If you are in year 10, I'd advice that you make quick summary notes of all the topics you are doing so that when you are in year 11 you have something to base yourself off of.
If you are in year 11, then I'd say that you should get a revision guide as the basis of your notes for a solid base knowledge of the topics you've done in year 10.

Now, for subjects like math and the sciences a good way to revise would be to solve problems, practice questions and past papers. Especially for math, where there can only be a set number of question forms they can ask that will keep recurring year after year.

For languages, Quizlet can be really good for vocabulary and there are numerous websites that you can use for verb conjugations and grammar.

Another good way is blurting, where you write down everything you know on a topic on a piece of paper and then see how much you actually know.
Also, Quizlet can be good for learning facts, quotes and figures in humanities and English.

Some people find mind maps useful as well as flashcards. Both as forms of notes as well as ways to test you knowledge.

If you want me to explain any of these in more detail, I'd be happy to help!
Last edited by _Mia101; 2 years ago
0
reply
Gracegrapecherry
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by _Mia101)
Okay, so which GCSEs are you doing. Different subjects have better ways of revising.

What you've been doing (reading your notes) is passive revision so it isn't always the best way of revision. It works for some people but there are always better ways.

Cramming does work though, like in some of my exams, (history, RS and Further Maths) I crammed the dates, facts, figures and formulas I needed, and it was fine.

However, the best thing is to make sure you have a solid understanding of the basis of the topic.

Are you in year 11 or year 10?

If you are in year 10, I'd advice that you make quick summary notes of all the topics you are doing so that when you are in year 11 you have something to base yourself off of.
If you are in year 11, then I'd say that you should get a revision guide as the basis of your notes for a solid base knowledge of the topics you've done in year 10.

Now, for subjects like math and the sciences a good way to revise would be to solve problems, practice questions and past papers. Especially for math, where there can only be a set number of question forms they can ask that will keep recurring year after year.

For languages, Quizlet can be really good for vocabulary and there are numerous websites that you can use for verb conjugations and grammar.

Another good way is blurting, where you write down everything you know on a topic on a piece of paper and then see how much you actually know.
Also, Quizlet can be good for learning facts, quotes and figures in humanities and English.

Some people find mind maps useful as well as flashcards. Both as forms of notes as well as ways to test you knowledge.

If you want me to explain any of these in more detail, I'd be happy to help!
Hello! Thank you for taking the time to reply!

I'm in yr 10 and I'm taking Additional Maths, Triple Science, English Lit and Lang, German, Latin, RS and Music. I've been using quizlet for languages, mindmaps for english, flashcards for RS and then standard notes for the other ones but I make them for the exam and never look at them again until finals... How would I review these? Would blurting work for reviewing? And where would I find past papers? Are there any other methods? Thank you so much!
0
reply
_Mia101
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by Gracegrapecherry)
Hello! Thank you for taking the time to reply!

I'm in yr 10 and I'm taking Additional Maths, Triple Science, English Lit and Lang, German, Latin, RS and Music. I've been using quizlet for languages, mindmaps for english, flashcards for RS and then standard notes for the other ones but I make them for the exam and never look at them again until finals... How would I review these? Would blurting work for reviewing? And where would I find past papers? Are there any other methods? Thank you so much!
You're welcome!
I'm in year 10 too!
Well, that means you still have quite a bit of time so you have time to make neat concise notes that you can use to revise in year 11.

For literature and rs you need to remember quotes, for that most people use quizlet.

Personally, ( I do RS) for my ra exam I just went through the text book got quotes wrote them on a piece of paper and I remember them just like that. For me, I remember stuff when I write them down and relate them to stuff. Like for roman 6:23 which says the wages of sin is death, in the textbook there was a sign of it so I remember it.

For German and Latin to remember vocab id advise you to make your own quizlet flashcards that are neatly organised according to your syllabus.

Also, for languages and their grammar, like verb tense rules I make very neat verb sheets that have the rule, the use, the stem for different verb groups as well as the mat common irregular verbs.

Blurting works for both revision and testing yourself as you can see what you know and it can help you remer stuff. You can check YouTube for the best way for Blurting (Unjaded Jade).

Stamdard notes are generally not effective as they are a passive form of revision. However, if you are like and me and remember stuff by writing them down it could work.

You really need to find the form of revision that works best for you.

For further maths I just do a lot of revision by doing questions in the textbook and trying to get my teacher to mark it. However, if there is a markscheme then I'd advice you to mark your own work ( for all subjects) so you can start understanding the mark scheme and how examiners work.

The mosy important part of revision is consistency, so if you are revising once in a blue moon then you won't see much progress.

I'm sure that there are other methods. You'd have to search on Google though, as these are the methods that I actively do.

Hope this helps!
Last edited by _Mia101; 2 years ago
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

If you don't put your camera on in online lessons, why is that?

My teacher doesn't want us to (76)
16.38%
No one else does (142)
30.6%
I'm embarrassed about my background (53)
11.42%
I feel self-conscious showing my face (163)
35.13%
We don't use a video platform (7)
1.51%
I don't have a camera (11)
2.37%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (12)
2.59%

Watched Threads

View All