Studying Natural Sciences at University of Bath

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Hi,

I am a current second year student at the University of Bath studying Natural Sciences. My major is biology and my minor is pharmacology & physiology, but I also do my optional module in organic chemistry.

If anyone has any questions about the course, life in Bath or university in general, feel free to ask! I will also be posting some more detailed things in this thread about my application process, why I chose Bath, what I think of the course etc., so make sure to follow this thread!

Jessica, a second year Natural Sciences student
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wattm056
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I'm in my last year of college, I have applied to bath for mechanical engineering but not sure whether to put it as my one of my final choices. the main things holding me back are the fact that you obviously only live on campus for your first year, and from what I can gather it's quite an expensive place to live. also how long is your commute to campus each day?
secondly since bath is quite small what's the night life like?
last of all I'd really like to start up some sport again(I used to be into football and may go back to that or try something new) but I know bath is very sporty, is there much to do if you're not county ranked or even good at the sport?
any guidance would be great
thanks x
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(Original post by wattm056)
I'm in my last year of college, I have applied to bath for mechanical engineering but not sure whether to put it as my one of my final choices. the main things holding me back are the fact that you obviously only live on campus for your first year, and from what I can gather it's quite an expensive place to live. also how long is your commute to campus each day?
secondly since bath is quite small what's the night life like?
last of all I'd really like to start up some sport again(I used to be into football and may go back to that or try something new) but I know bath is very sporty, is there much to do if you're not county ranked or even good at the sport?
any guidance would be great
thanks x
Hi,
That's great that you're considering Bath!

That is correct that you can only live on campus during first year (apart from exceptional cases/circumstances), but it is really not that difficult to find accommodation off-campus in subsequent years. Unfortunately, Bath is a bit more expensive than other universities in terms of accommodation (on average most people pay about £100-130 per week), but its not as bad as places like London. Despite being a bit more expensive in general, there are cheaper options if you bother to look properly when house-searching. If you are careful with your money and spend wisely, you shouldn't really have any issues.

The commute to campus by bus is about 15 minutes generally, but it can take about 30-40 minutes during peak times (i.e. 8-10am). Personally, I wake up ~1.5 hours before I need to get to campus so I have time to eat breakfast, get ready (i.e. not be in a rush) and then leave 40 mins before my I need to be there. So, if I need to be on campus for 9am, I'll wake up at 7.30 and get the bus at 8.20. This is a pain in comparison to first year when you can wake up 5 minutes before a lecture, but from what I've heard this is the norm at all campus universities when you need to get the bus from town to campus. A lot of people cycle or walk to campus as it's not that far - it takes about 30-40 minutes to walk and it is actually a really nice, scenic walk. I haven't personally, but from what I've heard cycling is a good option as it is fairly quick, taking about 30 mins uphill to campus and 10-15 mins downhill on the way back to town.

Bath really isn't as small as people make it out to be. While it is smaller than bigger cities like Manchester, there's still plenty to do in terms of nightlife. Being a city with 2 universities, its very student orientated with multiple club nights on every night of the week. Regardless of your music taste there'll be something for you, be it indie/rock music in Po Na Na or big artists like TQD in Komedia. Our SU also has its own student nights on campus - Klass on Saturdays and Score on Wednesdays - both are really popular so I'd highly recommend! If you did ever want to expereience nightlife in a bigger city, Bristol is only a 15 minute train ride away and there's some really good clubs like Lakota and Motion there. Most people are more than satisfied with the nightlife that Bath has to offer and only really go to Bristol for bigger nights out.

In terms of sports, I'd definitely not be put off by the stereotype that Bath is a "sporty" uni! We have good, professional level athletes but the university is amazing at providing options for people of all levels and abilities. For a given sport, i.e. football, there will be multiple teams of different standards (i.e. first, second, third) as well as development squads. For a lot of sports, including football, there will be interhalls or course teams so you play against other accommodations or courses. During Freshers' week there is a Sports Fair so you can go and see what sports are available, chat to players/committees to find out more and get information about trials and taster sessions. A large proportion of the people on sports teams at Bath had never played the sport before coming to uni, so I'd definitely consider Bath if this is something you're interested in. You can find out more about the sports available here, as there's a massive variety from rugby to skydiving!.

Essentially, while Bath is a bit more expensive than other places, it's really not something that should put you off choosing Bath so long as you can manage your money. The commute also isn't an issue, and the nightlife and sports are amazing here so I'd definitely recommend Bath for this! I hope this has helped, and feel free to ask any other questions you may have!

Thanks,
Jessica, a second year natural sciences student
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MY APPLICATION PROCESS:

I wanted to study Natural Sciences because my interests lie throughout the sciences, and I wouldn't have been satisfied studying just one. Furthermore, sciences are so interdisciplinary nowadays that you will be much more knowledgeable and employable if you've studied multiple areas and not just one, and having a good breadth of knowledge was important to me. Natural Sciences courses vary a lot between universities, and not many universities offer it so it was fairly hard to choose. I ended up applying to some for natural sciences, and some for biology:

- Bath - NatSci
- Cambridge - NatSci
- Durham - NatSci
- Imperial College - Biology
- Edinburgh - Biology

I had 9 A*s and 2As at GCSE, 5As at AS level and ultimately got 3As and 2A*s at A2 level in biology, chemistry, maths, classical civilisation and art. I got offers from all of my unis, apart from Cambridge where I had an interview and then got rejected - my offer from Bath was A*AA, which is the typical NatSci offer. On results day, my results came back as 4As and 1A* (the A* was in art so didn't count for my Bath offer), so initially I had missed my grades and couldn't come to Bath. I was devastated, so sent back my papers to be remarked and all of them went up. I got my grades, and got into Bath a week later. Most of my classmates had the same experience - it just so happened that Edexcel's marking was atrocious that year. From my experience, I would definitely recommend getting your papers remarked if you're only a few marks off a grade, as it can change your life! If I hadn't bothered to get my papers remarked, I wouldn't be at Bath now.

In my case, I wasn't interested in Cambridge as the course, location and just general vibe of the university didn't appeal to me at all, so I only applied as my school liked it if students who had good grades applied. Imperial, Durham and Edinburgh were all just back-ups as they're good unis but I knew I wanted to go to Bath from the start.

WHY I ULTIMATELY CHOSE BATH:
I knew the place was perfect for me - I didn't want to live in a big city as it is too stressful and expensive for me as someone who was just starting uni, but I didn't want to be at a campus uni in the middle of nowhere and get bored. Bath is the perfect middle ground as the city is just big enough and has plenty to do, but not too big. If I do want somewhere bigger, Bristol is only 15 minutes away. The city has loads of culture and history and just generally lots to do, be it nightlife, shopping or just relaxing.

With NatSci, however, the course is the most important thing to think about when applying/choosing your firm choice as the courses are so different between unis and its such a personalisable degree. For me, the Bath course allowed me to have a combination of modules that suited me best - I could study everything I wanted without having to take modules I didn't want to take. However, it's important to remember that its a very personal choice, particularly when it comes to NatSci as everyone is doing different module combinations. So while I think Bath is perfect for me, the module combinations available might not work for you. What I'd recommend doing (as it's what I did) is printing out the flowchart/list/sheet that university websites have detailing all the module combinations you can take, and highlighting all the modules you'd want to do so you can visually see which university will give you the most. In doing this I realised that if I went to Cambridge or Durham, I wouldn't have been able to take as many modules that I enjoy as I can at Bath.

I hope this was helpful, and I'll continue doing posts in this thread on my uni experience, what I think of the course, social life etc. Please let me know if there's anything in partciular you'd like me to talk about, or if you have any questions!
Jessica, second year Natural Sciences student
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how many hours do you spend sleeping , studying
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(Original post by Qwertyuser123)
how many hours do you spend sleeping , studying
Hi,
Thanks for your question!

On average, I have about 10-13 lectures (each 1 hour) every week, plus labs if I have any timetabled. This is pretty typical of a STEM course, so it will be similar at most universities. It varies by the time of year, so for example one of my modules finished lectures a month before christmas, so for a month I had 4 lectures less a week. Commitments aside from lectures vary by module, so I'll outline what I know from my modules below:

-BIOLOGY: No tutorials so far, only had 2 lab sessions in 1st year (for ecology & evolution)

-PHARMACOLOGY & PHYSIOLOGY: No tutorials so far, no labs in first year. Depending on what modules you choose later on, you may or may not have labs. I chose a practical module in 2nd year, so I had four 3 hour lab sessions in semester 1.

-INORGANIC & ORGANIC CHEMISTRY: 1 tutorial every week in a cycle (i.e. week 1 is organic, week 2 is inorganic, week 3 is physical), so if you only take 1 chemistry module, you'll only have 1 tutorial every 3 weeks. Labs also work as a cycle, with one 4 hour lab session a week for 5 weeks for organic, then it repeats afterwards but for inorganic.

-BIOCHEMISTRY: I don't take biochemistry but I know from my friends that they have lab sessions in first year onwards.

I don't know about this for other modules, but you can find more information here and in the unit catalogue. Generally, chemistry modules are the most time consuming, but in general the time committment for lectures etc. is the same as other unis.

As it is university, you are expected to do 70% of your study independently (i.e. not lectures). Typically, I'll work on notes and coursework in between lectures throughout the day so I have more free time in the evening, and then spend 1-3 hours on work in the evening. Again though, it depends on the time of year. Leading up to exams or coursework deadlines, I'll spend more time working. However there's other times when there's simply not much work for me to do. The main thing is just maintaining a steady level of work so you stay on top of things, so I find the way I work to be okay. Again, this will be the same at all universities. The benefit of Bath is that our personal tutors and lecturers are always happy to help so you can manage your work, which isn't the case at a lot of unis.

In terms of sleeping, sleep about 7-10 hours depending on when my earliest lecture is. Again though, this will depend on how well you stay on top of things. I like to get things done ASAP so I can relax, go to the gym etc. so I manage to get to bed in time to get enough sleep.

To give you an idea, I'll outline an average day:

-7-9am (depending on first lecture): Wake up, get ready, get to campus

-9am to 4/5pm: Go to lectures, labs, meetings etc. and work in free time. Eat lunch at some point. Head home after last lecture.

- 5-6.30pm - Gym and shower

- 6.30-7pm - Eat dinner and relax for a bit

- 7-9pm - Work/study (may work for a bit longer while watching TV etc.)

Overall, the time spent studying, sleeping etc. is pretty similar through all universities - it more depends on the person. I hope this has helped, and let me know if you have any more questions!

Thanks,
Jessica, 2nd year Natural Sciences student
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(Original post by University of Bath)
Hi,

I am a current second year student at the University of Bath studying Natural Sciences. My major is biology and my minor is pharmacology & physiology, but I also do my optional module in organic chemistry.

If anyone has any questions about the course, life in Bath or university in general, feel free to ask! I will also be posting some more detailed things in this thread about my application process, why I chose Bath, what I think of the course etc., so make sure to follow this thread!

Eryn, a second year Natural Sciences student
Hi Eryn,
I am a Year 12 Student considering Natural Sciences at Bath for my university studies.
May I ask what grades you got at GCSE and A- Level (and in which subjects)? Trying to work out if I am the calibre to study this course.
Thank you!
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(Original post by ordpriya)
Hi Eryn,
I am a Year 12 Student considering Natural Sciences at Bath for my university studies.
May I ask what grades you got at GCSE and A- Level (and in which subjects)? Trying to work out if I am the calibre to study this course.
Thank you!
Hi there,
If you refer back to my previous post in this thread about my application process, I've gone in depth into my grades and subjects at GCSE and A-Level, so look there for more information. Briefly, however, for GCSE I did:
- Maths, English literature, Art, Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Spanish, French, Latin - grade A*
- English language, PE - grade A
At AS level I did:
- Biology, Chemistry, Maths, Classical Civilisation and Art - grade A
At A2 (so complete A-Level) I did:
- Biology and Art - grade A*
- Chemistry, Classics and Maths - grade A
My main points here would be that for GCSE you are required to have a minimum grade C in english language and mathematics for virtually any good univeristy course in the UK. Also, I did 5 A-levels but this is not at all necessary - I just really enjoyed Classics and Art and din't want to give them up. You only need 3 A-levels for your application, and the standard offer for NatSci at Bath is A*AA in 2 sciences and maths.

What A-Levels you need depends on what major and minor combination you would want to study in the natural sciences course. You can find more ifnormation about the A-level subject requirements here.
I hope this has helped,
Jessica, 2nd year Natural Sciences student
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How much work do you tend to do on the weekends?
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How much work do you tend to do on the weekends?
Hi!
The amount I work on weekends usually depends on how much work I have to do and how proactive I've been throughout the week. Generally, I like to get as much done during the week (i.e. in between lectures and in the afternoons when I don't have anything on) so that I have more free time on the weekends. By doing this, I only have to spend a few hours on a Sunday doing notes etc. for the week ahead, as I like to keep saturdays free and be prepared for the next week. If I have coursework deadlines, I'll obviously have more working hours on the weekends. So, overall I only spend a few hours on the weekend working, and maybe more if I don't have anything on to get a head start. This changes depending on coursework and if I've fallen behind throughout the week. Essentially how much weekend work you have just depends on how proactive you are.
I hope this has helped,
Jessica, a second year Natural Science student
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Hi, I've got an offer for natsci and currently thinking bath will be my top. Wondering if the lectures are recorded, if you have tutorials (or smaller teaching classes) and what accommodation you lived in first year? Thanks!
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(Original post by emmawlkr)
Hi, I've got an offer for natsci and currently thinking bath will be my top. Wondering if the lectures are recorded, if you have tutorials (or smaller teaching classes) and what accommodation you lived in first year? Thanks!
Hi,
That's great that you're considering firming Bath! If you let me know what module/stream combination you're thinking of, I could probably give you a better answer.

Most lectures are recorded, although it depends on the module/department and the lecturer. I study Biology, Pharmacy and Chemistry so for me:
- The chemistry department now records all lectures
- Most of my pharmacy lectures are recorded this year, but they weren't all last year
- All of my biology lectures are recorded, with the exception of a few lecturers
I'm not sure about other modules as I don't take them, but generally, most lectures are filmed but I would recommend emailing the lecturer beforehand to check. Definitely go to the first lecture of each lecturer/module to check just in case.

If you take chemistry, yoy will definitely have tutorials where you have to do exam-style questions then go through them with a PhD student or lecturer. These are in groups of ~4-7 people usually. I've never had a tutorial for biology or phamacy, but some people do so again it just depends on your module combination. I have had seminars for pharmacy & biology, but these are in larger groups of ~50 people. I've had workshops for all of my modules, but these are with everyone who would be in a regular lecture and you just split into groups, do the questions and then the lecturer will walk through them for everyone.

In first year, I lived in Solsbury/Marlborough. I loved having such a big bedroom, but in retrospect I would've applied for somewhere like Eastwood or Norwood, as these bedrooms are the same size, but you share bathrooms (which I was scared of but it actually isn't an issue at all). I say this as I would've saved a lot of money by not having an ensuite, and these accommodations have more people in a flat (Solsbury/Marlborough only has 5-7) so I would've had a much better time socially.

Please let me know if you have anymore questions,
Jessica, a second year Natural Sciences student
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(Original post by University of Bath)
Hi,

I am a current second year student at the University of Bath studying Natural Sciences. My major is biology and my minor is pharmacology & physiology, but I also do my optional module in organic chemistry.

If anyone has any questions about the course, life in Bath or university in general, feel free to ask! I will also be posting some more detailed things in this thread about my application process, why I chose Bath, what I think of the course etc., so make sure to follow this thread!

Jessica, a second year Natural Sciences student
Hi everyone,

I am now finishing my placement and going into my final year of Natural Sciences at Bath, so please ask me any questions you may have! It can be about the course, accommodation, part-time work, student life and so on!

Jessica, a final year Natural Sciences student
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Hi everyone,

I am now finishing my placement and going into my final year of Natural Sciences at Bath, so please ask me any questions you may have! It can be about the course, accommodation, part-time work, student life and so on!

Jessica, a final year Natural Sciences student
hi, i'm in year 12 considering applying to bath for natsci and i do biology, chemistry and psychology. we haven't got our predicted grades yet, but should i still apply if my predicteds are AAA? i know the requirements say A*AA but there is a lowered offer for AS maths/EPQ, both of which I'm doing.

also, does doing a placement make it more likely you'll get a job at that organisation after graduating? and can i switch onto/off the placement course option? thank you!
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Hi

I'm currently thinking of doing Biology, Chemistry and Pharmacology at Bath. I know you've already answered this, but would you be able to give an updated breakdown of how much contact time/small group teaching you hand in first and second year, did you have any tutorials for Biology. I also saw on the module list that some of the modules say 'for natural sciences', does this mean you are taught separately to single sciences?

Having never studied it before, how does the pharmacology content compare to biology because, for example i know both streams cover neuroscience, how different is the teaching, ie how focused is the pharma on drugs as opposed to learning about the brain.

Thanks in advance
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(Original post by skiii)
hi, i'm in year 12 considering applying to bath for natsci and i do biology, chemistry and psychology. we haven't got our predicted grades yet, but should i still apply if my predicteds are AAA? i know the requirements say A*AA but there is a lowered offer for AS maths/EPQ, both of which I'm doing.

also, does doing a placement make it more likely you'll get a job at that organisation after graduating? and can i switch onto/off the placement course option? thank you!
Hi there,

That's great that you're considering applying to Bath for NatSci! With biology and chemistry, you can study any of the Bath NatSci streams, except for physics, so it's a really good A-Level combination to have.

I would say that you should still apply if your predicted grades are AAA - predicted grades aren't always accurate, and universities know that, so it won't be the only factor they take into account. If you believe your grades could be higher, then I believe you can contest your predicted grades in some cases. If you're doing AS maths and an EPQ, then even more reason for you to still apply if your predicted grades are A*AA! Overall, I'd say to definitely apply as th university will look at the full package, not just your predicted grades

In terms of placements, it depends really! Employers often offer placements as a way to secure graduates when they graduate, as then they get fresh new employees. So, many employers may offer you a graduate job, but this isn't a guarantee obviously. Having links and experience with an employer will obviously increase your chances of getting hired by them, but again it doesn't guarantee it. All in all, doing a placement will increase your chances of securing a graduate job, be that with your placement employer or someone else. Most students won't have industry experience when they graduate, so doing a placement sets you above the rest.

And finally, you can (within reason) switch from placement to non-placement and vice-versa. It is generally advised that you apply and start with a placement, as that way you have access to all the training sessions they give in first year. Throughout first year the placements teams do sessions on how placements work, writing a CV, job interview and skills assessment practices and so on. If you started without a placement, you would miss all these sessions. In the summer between first and second year, the placements team helps you write a CV, and at the start of 2nd year you begin applying for placements. Essentially, it's better to start with a placement so you get all this help, and then drop out of the placement, as opposed to starting without and deciding last minute that you do want a placement.

I hope this has helped,
Jessica, a final year NatSci student
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Hi

I'm currently thinking of doing Biology, Chemistry and Pharmacology at Bath. I know you've already answered this, but would you be able to give an updated breakdown of how much contact time/small group teaching you hand in first and second year, did you have any tutorials for Biology. I also saw on the module list that some of the modules say 'for natural sciences', does this mean you are taught separately to single sciences?

Having never studied it before, how does the pharmacology content compare to biology because, for example i know both streams cover neuroscience, how different is the teaching, ie how focused is the pharma on drugs as opposed to learning about the brain.

Thanks in advance
Hi,

I'll give as good a breakdown as I can

First Year


I started out with biology major, chemistry minor and pharmacology as my optional module
Biology
About 5 lectures per week, and an occasional lab or workshops throughout the year. I personally never had any tutorials for biology, and I don't know anyone who did. A few people I know had biology-related tutorials as their personal tutor was a biology lecturer, but I didn't have this. I can only remember 2 labs, both for the Ecology and Evolution modules - one observing fossils in the lab, and one going to Bristol Zoo and doing different observational activities.
Chemistry
About 6 lectures per week - 3 per chemistry module I took. I took inorganic and organic, but not physical chemistry. I also had a chemistry tutorial with a group of about 5 of us on a Friday - inorganic one week, organic the next and then nothing the 3rd week (this would be physical Chemistry but I didn't take this module). Basically, the 3 chemistry modules have tutorials on a rotating cycle. We also had a 4 hour slot on Friday for chemistry labs. These also worked on a cycle, so we'd have about 5-6 weeks for organic chemistry, then inorganic, then physical. Again, I only had this for organic and inorganic.
Pharmacology


About 4 pharmacology lectures per week. I had the occasional workshop of about 30 people, and I can only remember doing 1 lab which was basically a full day in a lab doing different activities.

In first year, it is mostly lectures for biology and pharmacology and very little (if any) workshops, tutorials and labs. The teaching for chemistry is a lot more varied in first year. I also didn't have any coursework in first year, only my chemistry labs which counted for 20% of the grades. Everything else was exams, but obviously your first year grades don't count towards you degree (they just help you get a good placement).

Second Year
In second year, I switched my degree to Biology major, Pharmacology minor and chemistry as an optional module. I dropped inorganic chemistry, took up more pharmacology and only kept organic chemistry as my optional module. This flexibility was amazing for me, as I ended up hating inorganic chemistry so I'm happy I was able to drop it.
Biology
About 5 lectures per week. I had quite a few labs for biology in 2nd year, but these were all for Ecology and Evolution again as there is a booklet of labs that you work through. These aren't really "labs" in the traditional sense (i.e. they aren't like a chemistry lab). One involved observing and manipulating duck behaviour and feeding out at the lake on campus, another was observing beetles mating in a petri dish and then devising your own experiment using pheromones to manipulate their behaviour. For my genomics module, we had a few computer-room workshop sessions where we had to do computer based work researching genomics topics and answering set questions. Again, I never had any tutorials for biology, but there are more workshops and labs than in first year (depending on what modules you choose). There's also a few essays for some modules, so less exams. I would say that ecology and evolution has the best variety of teaching, as the others are mainly lectures.
Pharmacology
About 5 lectures per week. There a lot more choice for modules in second year, so your contact time will vary. I only had 5 lectures as I chose practical pharmacology as one of my modules, and this is entirely lab based. This meant I had a few ~4 hour lab sessions in one semester for this module, instead of lectures. I also had quite a few workshops in 2nd year for pharmacology, so you end up doing more smaller-group (~30-50 people) teaching sessions. This could be sitting in groups and doing group work/problem solving. I never had any tutorials for pharmacology.
Chemistry
About 3 lectures per week (half as many as first year as I dropped one of the modules). The same system with labs and tutorials as in first year.

In 2nd year, you have a lot more freedom in choosing your modules, so your time breakdown can vary quite a lot. Chemistry has a good variety of teaching, as they incorporate workshops into lectures (i.e. midway through a lecture you'll be given some workshop questions to do), and have labs and tutorials. Some biology modules, like cell biology, are basically 100% lectures, but others, like ecology and evolution, have a really good variety.

I would say that the one downside to the course is how exam-heavy the course is in 1st and 2nd year, as the majority of your grades depend on exams (so I had about 5-7 exams per semester). Only about 20-30% of my grades came from coursework. Now in my final year however, my grades are basically entirely coursework based with only 2-3 exams. The department coordinator has told me that they know this is an issue so are working on making it less exam-heavy, so hopefully the improvements will be made

All in all, your breakdown depends on modules you choose. You can see detailed information about the modules, what content is taught, and how they are examined (i.e. what % of the grade is from exams, group work, presentations or essays) in the unit catalogue.

In terms of modules saying "for natural sciences", again it depends. All of my biology and chemistry lectures were with the normal biology and chemistry lectures. My labs were separate, but this is just because of numbers (i.e. they can't fit 2 courses-worth of students in one lecture hall). For chemistry, NatSci students only do 3 out of 5 (I believe) chemistry labs, but this is just because the final 2 labs contain content from other chemistry modules that not all NatSci student will take. For pharmacology, I can't remember exactly but I think some lectures were just NatSci and others with the normal pharmacology students. All in all, regardless of whether your lectures are with the students from that course, you are studying the same content to the same depth and detail as they are. The only reason it says "for natural sciences" is if they have to adjust it slightly for NatSci, as NatSci students all study different modules. For example, I may study pharmacology modules A and B, but another NatSci may only study A. That means they cannot include information from B when teaching A, as some students may do module B so won't have the same knowledge. On the straight pharmacology course, everyone studies all the modules so they don't need to adjust anything.

Personally I would say that there isn't a lot of neuroscience in either biology or pharmacology. First year biology you have no neuroscience at all, and first year pharmacology is basically studying and learning all the systems in the body. So, you'll study the nervous system, but no detailed neuroscience. In 2nd year pharmacology, you can choose to do Central Nervous System (i.e. mental health and other CNS disorders like Parkinson's) and Peripheral Nervous System modules, which is the closest you'll get too any neuroscience. These basically involve learning about different conditions, what causes them, what drugs can treat them and the mechanisms of these drugs. There is a neuroscience module you can choose in biology, but I didn't take it so I cannot comment on it. This module progresses onto a final year neuroscience module (molecular and medical neuroscience), and the pharmacology CNS module also progresses onto a final year module. Basically, the only neuroscience you get is via CNS modules in pharmacology, and if you choose the neuroscience module each year in biology. The only other way would be to take psychology as your optional module, as this progresses to a cognitive neuroscience module in second year. You don't take your optional module in final year though!

Basically, if you are interested in neuroscience then your best bet would be to do Biology major, pharmacology minor (or pharmacology major and biology minor - the only difference if your final year project is in your major) with psychology as your optional module The biology module is definitely more neuroscience based, a the pharmacology is more condition --> what causes it and what are the symptoms --> what drugs can be used ---> what mechanism does the drug work by.

I hope this has covered everything, and please let me know if you have any more questions
Jessica, a final year NatSci student
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skiii
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#18
(Original post by University of Bath)
Hi there,

That's great that you're considering applying to Bath for NatSci! With biology and chemistry, you can study any of the Bath NatSci streams, except for physics, so it's a really good A-Level combination to have.

I would say that you should still apply if your predicted grades are AAA - predicted grades aren't always accurate, and universities know that, so it won't be the only factor they take into account. If you believe your grades could be higher, then I believe you can contest your predicted grades in some cases. If you're doing AS maths and an EPQ, then even more reason for you to still apply if your predicted grades are A*AA! Overall, I'd say to definitely apply as th university will look at the full package, not just your predicted grades

In terms of placements, it depends really! Employers often offer placements as a way to secure graduates when they graduate, as then they get fresh new employees. So, many employers may offer you a graduate job, but this isn't a guarantee obviously. Having links and experience with an employer will obviously increase your chances of getting hired by them, but again it doesn't guarantee it. All in all, doing a placement will increase your chances of securing a graduate job, be that with your placement employer or someone else. Most students won't have industry experience when they graduate, so doing a placement sets you above the rest.

And finally, you can (within reason) switch from placement to non-placement and vice-versa. It is generally advised that you apply and start with a placement, as that way you have access to all the training sessions they give in first year. Throughout first year the placements teams do sessions on how placements work, writing a CV, job interview and skills assessment practices and so on. If you started without a placement, you would miss all these sessions. In the summer between first and second year, the placements team helps you write a CV, and at the start of 2nd year you begin applying for placements. Essentially, it's better to start with a placement so you get all this help, and then drop out of the placement, as opposed to starting without and deciding last minute that you do want a placement.

I hope this has helped,
Jessica, a final year NatSci student
thank you so much, this has really helped
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skiii
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#19
(Original post by University of Bath)
Hi there,

That's great that you're considering applying to Bath for NatSci! With biology and chemistry, you can study any of the Bath NatSci streams, except for physics, so it's a really good A-Level combination to have.

I would say that you should still apply if your predicted grades are AAA - predicted grades aren't always accurate, and universities know that, so it won't be the only factor they take into account. If you believe your grades could be higher, then I believe you can contest your predicted grades in some cases. If you're doing AS maths and an EPQ, then even more reason for you to still apply if your predicted grades are A*AA! Overall, I'd say to definitely apply as th university will look at the full package, not just your predicted grades

In terms of placements, it depends really! Employers often offer placements as a way to secure graduates when they graduate, as then they get fresh new employees. So, many employers may offer you a graduate job, but this isn't a guarantee obviously. Having links and experience with an employer will obviously increase your chances of getting hired by them, but again it doesn't guarantee it. All in all, doing a placement will increase your chances of securing a graduate job, be that with your placement employer or someone else. Most students won't have industry experience when they graduate, so doing a placement sets you above the rest.

And finally, you can (within reason) switch from placement to non-placement and vice-versa. It is generally advised that you apply and start with a placement, as that way you have access to all the training sessions they give in first year. Throughout first year the placements teams do sessions on how placements work, writing a CV, job interview and skills assessment practices and so on. If you started without a placement, you would miss all these sessions. In the summer between first and second year, the placements team helps you write a CV, and at the start of 2nd year you begin applying for placements. Essentially, it's better to start with a placement so you get all this help, and then drop out of the placement, as opposed to starting without and deciding last minute that you do want a placement.

I hope this has helped,
Jessica, a final year NatSci student
oh also, how would you write a personal statement as natsci is about different sciences?

and do you have any recommendations in terms of further reading/lectures for biology and chem? thank you!!
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University of Bath
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#20
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#20
(Original post by skiii)
thank you so much, this has really helped
Hi there,

No problem, I'm happy to help

Jessica, a final year NatSci student
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