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    I'm applying for law and LSE so far will probably be my top choice if I don't get into Cambridge and in fact maybe even if I do (that's another discussion haha). But as Ive done more research into LSE Im worried it wont suit my personality. I am pretty 'happy go lucky' for want of a better phrase; I dont think I am very career driven, I am much more passionate about the academia side of things. Not that Im saying LSE students arent passionate about their courses haha but more that there seems to be a real ambition and drive amongst LSE students which I find quite intimidating as I am just pretty chilled out about the whole career thing and am not even sure what exactly I want to do. I just want peoples thoughts I guess; is my whole idea just a massively wrong stereotype? Would I feel like an odd one out?
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    LeapingLucy might be able to give some insight (although I don't think she does law...?)

    I believe people have commented before law is among the courses where students tend to be a bit more focused on that (along with A&F, econ and the various similar courses), but I don't know to what extent that is true. Invariably there will be some who have less focused interests in that regard in the course, and undoubtedly outside it.
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    (Original post by Potentiallawgirl)
    I'm applying for law and LSE so far will probably be my top choice if I don't get into Cambridge and in fact maybe even if I do (that's another discussion haha). But as Ive done more research into LSE Im worried it wont suit my personality. I am pretty 'happy go lucky' for want of a better phrase; I dont think I am very career driven, I am much more passionate about the academia side of things. Not that Im saying LSE students arent passionate about their courses haha but more that there seems to be a real ambition and drive amongst LSE students which I find quite intimidating as I am just pretty chilled out about the whole career thing and am not even sure what exactly I want to do. I just want peoples thoughts I guess; is my whole idea just a massively wrong stereotype? Would I feel like an odd one out?
    Thanks for the tag artful_lounger

    I'm a second year Government and History student at LSE, though I know a lot of people who do law.

    In my experience, the majority of the law students at LSE do seem very career-driven. Even in first year they were always off going to first-year events at magic circle/silver circle firms, and going to law application training sessions/workshops + networking events. I think this is what you have to do to be honest if you want a corporate law career - the recruitment process effectively starts when you're in second year, with applications for vacation schemes, so you have to start preparing in first year. It's especially important for international students (there are a lot of Chinese/Singaporeans on the law course) because if they want to stay in the UK after they finish their degree, they have to graduate with a job to go to. Having said that, there are also several aspiring academics among the law students, so some of them do place academics above training contracts.

    The Economics/Finance students are also, on the whole, very career-driven. (For them, getting recruited to investment banks starts even earlier, in first year)

    But other courses - government, history, social policy, social anthropology, IR etc. - tend to have slightly less career-focused students in my opinion. Most of the people I've met doing these courses chose these subjects because they love studying them (as did I). They tend to have a less fixed idea of what they want to do after uni, and most will probably do a masters before making a final decision.
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    Is your mother the Vice President of Chile? If so, you will fit in just fine.
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    If you'd prefer a more normal, less pressured environment, try somewhere like Bristol - all the respectability but without the stupidly over-competitive culture.
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    I’d worry about it when/if you get an offer
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    (Original post by Potentiallawgirl)
    I'm applying for law and LSE so far will probably be my top choice if I don't get into Cambridge and in fact maybe even if I do (that's another discussion haha). But as Ive done more research into LSE Im worried it wont suit my personality. I am pretty 'happy go lucky' for want of a better phrase; I dont think I am very career driven, I am much more passionate about the academia side of things. Not that Im saying LSE students arent passionate about their courses haha but more that there seems to be a real ambition and drive amongst LSE students which I find quite intimidating as I am just pretty chilled out about the whole career thing and am not even sure what exactly I want to do. I just want peoples thoughts I guess; is my whole idea just a massively wrong stereotype? Would I feel like an odd one out?
    @LeapingLucy's given a solid insight already, so I'll add my two cents (as a final year A&F student with friends in various courses). Most people in Law are very driven. If your ideal university life involves chilling out and having engaging intellectual debates with your course mates, don't come to the LSE. Most people would fill their time with applications, networking and prestigious extracurriculars. I'm not saying that chill people don't exist, just that there's a low probability of finding them, although if you do then you're set. I personally was not very driven and managed to find people like me- however my friends aren't as intellectually minded either, which is a bit disappointing. On the other hand if you're into sports, drama, music or dance you can join one of these and meet like-minded people who don't really stress about jobs and want to enjoy themselves, because all the job-obsessed ones tend to be in career societies. Other socs aren't really active (apart from cultural socs) so it's a hit or miss whether the committee of any specific one is good during the time that you'll be there. The UN and Debate socs may suit you but people normally do stuff like that for their CV, so you might feel a bit left out when they start talking about parliamentary work experience and stuff like that.
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    Yawn

    Academia and 'careers' are not exclusive

    Quite the opposite - the people that boss that latter tend to be academic weapons
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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    Yawn

    Academia and 'careers' are not exclusive

    Quite the opposite - the people that boss that latter tend to be academic weapons
    But I didnt say that they were exclusive, I was asking if the drive in LSE students was mainly from their next steps in their career path meaning they would typically be very concerned with things like their placement schemes and networking ect which take priority over other things in their free time. Clearly, anyone who goes to a top institution like LSE would be academic, maybe I should have worded my post better haha
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    op read this https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=4273688
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    (Original post by rumatar)
    I’d worry about it when/if you get an offer
    Im a gap year applicant so unless I really screw up my LNAT I'm hoping I will likely get an offer, that might be naive thinking though. I dont think it really hurts to think about, its nice to have a clear idea of where you would like to end up.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)If you'd prefer a more normal, less pressured environment, try somewhere like Bristol - all the respectability but without the stupidly over-competitive culture.

    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    If you'd prefer a more normal, less pressured environment, try somewhere like Bristol - all the respectability but without the stupidly over-competitive culture.
    Yeah I am not a very competitive person at all haha, maybe I could become one though if I needed to? Ive applied for glasgow, ucl, lse, cambridge and durham I have no idea if any of those unis are particularly non-competitive... maybe Glasgow but that was kind of just to fill up an application space
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    I feel like there needs to be a little bit of a caveat here:

    Law students at all of the top law schools tend to be concerned with career placements, vac schemes, and whatever else it is that corporate sell outs... corporate law focused students tend to do.

    The public lawyers tend to be virtually uninvolved in all of that stuff. Though I didn’t go to LSE, none of my law friends were worried talking about vac schemes and this firm or that firm, because we simply didn’t care. I went and worked for non-profits during the summer.
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    (Original post by Potentiallawgirl)
    (Original post by returnmigrant)If you'd prefer a more normal, less pressured environment, try somewhere like Bristol - all the respectability but without the stupidly over-competitive culture.


    Yeah I am not a very competitive person at all haha, maybe I could become one though if I needed to? Ive applied for glasgow, ucl, lse, cambridge and durham I have no idea if any of those unis are particularly non-competitive... maybe Glasgow but that was kind of just to fill up an application space
    Plenty of people you should be able to find at Durham, speaking from personal experience.
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    (Original post by LeapingLucy)
    Thanks for the tag artful_lounger

    I'm a second year Government and History student at LSE, though I know a lot of people who do law.

    In my experience, the majority of the law students at LSE do seem very career-driven. Even in first year they were always off going to first-year events at magic circle/silver circle firms, and going to law application training sessions/workshops + networking events. I think this is what you have to do to be honest if you want a corporate law career - the recruitment process effectively starts when you're in second year, with applications for vacation schemes, so you have to start preparing in first year. It's especially important for international students (there are a lot of Chinese/Singaporeans on the law course) because if they want to stay in the UK after they finish their degree, they have to graduate with a job to go to. Having said that, there are also several aspiring academics among the law students, so some of them do place academics above training contracts.

    The Economics/Finance students are also, on the whole, very career-driven. (For them, getting recruited to investment banks starts even earlier, in first year)

    But other courses - government, history, social policy, social anthropology, IR etc. - tend to have slightly less career-focused students in my opinion. Most of the people I've met doing these courses chose these subjects because they love studying them (as did I). They tend to have a less fixed idea of what they want to do after uni, and most will probably do a masters before making a final decision.

    Thanks this was such a useful insight! I wouldnt mind going to a few events here and there but yeah I would never want it to take over my life, at least until I knew for sure what I wanted to do. Im just worried I would feel really intimidated and inadequate I guess
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    (Original post by CityofMud)
    @LeapingLucy's given a solid insight already, so I'll add my two cents (as a final year A&F student with friends in various courses). Most people in Law are very driven. If your ideal university life involves chilling out and having engaging intellectual debates with your course mates, don't come to the LSE. Most people would fill their time with applications, networking and prestigious extracurriculars. I'm not saying that chill people don't exist, just that there's a low probability of finding them, although if you do then you're set. I personally was not very driven and managed to find people like me- however my friends aren't as intellectually minded either, which is a bit disappointing. On the other hand if you're into sports, drama, music or dance you can join one of these and meet like-minded people who don't really stress about jobs and want to enjoy themselves, because all the job-obsessed ones tend to be in career societies. Other socs aren't really active (apart from cultural socs) so it's a hit or miss whether the committee of any specific one is good during the time that you'll be there. The UN and Debate socs may suit you but people normally do stuff like that for their CV, so you might feel a bit left out when they start talking about parliamentary work experience and stuff like that.
    Thanks this was really insightful! I really like the sound of the law course at LSE, especially the contemporary factor which Ive heard LSE in general is just very good at. Obviously I do want to do some work for my CV and all that stuff but I dont think I would want it to be all I do. I have to think about it all I guess...have you found there to be a competitive culture at LSE or is everyone quite friendly? I feel like thats such a dumb unaswerable question lol but I guess thats just one of my worries. Thanks again
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    (Original post by Potentiallawgirl)
    Im a gap year applicant so unless I really screw up my LNAT I'm hoping I will likely get an offer, that might be naive thinking though. I dont think it really hurts to think about, its nice to have a clear idea of where you would like to end up.
    You most likely will get an offer but LSE are a bit weird. I’m also applying to LSE as a gap year applicant, exceeding the entry requirements and I’m still nervous about not getting an offer. Good luck with your application anyway
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    (Original post by Potentiallawgirl)
    Thanks this was really insightful! I really like the sound of the law course at LSE, especially the contemporary factor which Ive heard LSE in general is just very good at. Obviously I do want to do some work for my CV and all that stuff but I dont think I would want it to be all I do. I have to think about it all I guess...have you found there to be a competitive culture at LSE or is everyone quite friendly? I feel like thats such a dumb unaswerable question lol but I guess thats just one of my worries. Thanks again
    Your framing is terrible:

    Most law students don't go into corporate law
    Applications tend to be sent off over the holidays
    People who are competitive in what they think can still be nice to other people - particularly if they've only just met them. There's no reason for anyone to be a **** to anyone else.
    Plenty of law students help each other out, particularly in third year and beyond. Things like reading each others' applications are mutually beneficial.
    Most law students don't hang out with each other - their friendship groups (just like any other friendship group in London) are created through societies and halls (and student houses in second and third year)

    If you want to be academic, just be academic and find friends through societies that you care about. That's about it.

    There's no special 'contemporary factor' in the LSE law course. It does offer some modules which tend to be reserved for postgrads elsewhere (e.g. tax, labour law), but that's only by turning its obligations and property/trusts modules into a content-packed nightmare (which frees up space for more options).
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    (Original post by NYU℠)
    I feel like there needs to be a little bit of a caveat here:

    Law students at all of the top law schools tend to be concerned with career placements, vac schemes, and whatever else it is that corporate sell outs... corporate law focused students tend to do.

    The public lawyers tend to be virtually uninvolved in all of that stuff. Though I didn’t go to LSE, none of my law friends were worried talking about vac schemes and this firm or that firm, because we simply didn’t care. I went and worked for non-profits during the summer.
    finally someone who said it

    thank u my good sir
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    (Original post by JohanGRK)
    ‘Contemporary factor’
    I was going to bring this up, but I’m glad you did.

    To OP Potentiallawgirl... I’m not sure what you mean by ‘contemporary factor,’ but I’ve never heard of such a thing. I would hope that every law school is teaching contemporary (i.e. up to date) law, otherwise they would be teaching you bad law.
 
 
 
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