I think I've picked the wrong course. Watch

TheBigT
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Hey,

I'll try to keep this concise. I made a snap decision to study biomedical science as I have an interest in the medical industry and biology, but lately I feel as if it's more of a hobby rather than something I can seriously dedicate most of my free time to.. I enjoy reading some scientific literature and keeping up to date with medical advances, but that's about it. I find it quite difficult to motivate myself to study any of the course content. Not to mention that I can't stop thinking about how I'll spend 4 years of my life and £36,000 to graduate and earn £21,000 per year then face having to wait a further 4 years to complete my HCPC registration to move up to ~£25,000. I could earn that much in 4 years worth of quarterly performance-based salary reviews in my current job.

I've always loved managing things and being in a responsible position, as well as leading a team. For these reasons (and the fact that I've realised the salary ceiling of my work is actually very important to me), I feel as if I should transfer on to a management related degree. The prospect of getting on to a related grad scheme is so exciting to me; I'm particularly keen on anything customer service related. I have experience in running my own business as I started one relating to gaming when I was 14, we were even sponsored by a huge tech company. In recent years I've written a few business plans, though as I'm now a broke student, these are obviously on hold.

When I analyse all of my interests, management and business are the ones which stand out the most. I feel like I am faking it with biomedical science sometimes. If I'm not giving advice or teaching someone, I lose interest quickly.

I believe some people are made for BMS, but I'm starting to think I'm not one of them. I really do love science, but the practicality of it all really puts me off. I don't want to be waiting years and years to move up to the next grade and earn an extra few quid. I've always put a lot of value in having enough leftover cash each month to put towards starting a business.

I'd kept these thoughts suppressed as I saw them as negative before, but I'm starting to face reality and understand that they're not something to shy away from - they are what really drives me. I'll never be that always in the lab PhD because I simply cannot push myself that far knowing how bad the pay will be. Greedy? Probably. But that's how it is.

I made this thread to ask if anybody out there has gotten themselves on to the wrong degree, and if so, what was the outcome like after you changed? While I'm analysing myself and what I really want, I'm trying to be as objective as I can, but it's tough. Am I overthinking this all? Should I just stick with BMS? I'm leaning towards no, but I'd be grateful to hear somebody else's perspective.

Oops, this got a bit longer than it was supposed to. Anyway, have a good day people!
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JTR__
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I had a slightly similar situation:

I had been set on studying science (chemistry) for a few years, then the summer before applying I 'discovered' an interest in economics- it was the application of maths that drew me to both but I realised that economics was more appealing (won't go into details). I read lots, found a couple of online courses, and started linking some parts of my science interests to economics!

Spent a few months worrying over it, but was eventually convinced that chemistry was the safe/smart/responsible option so I applied and got in. When I went to uni I wanted to keep up some volunteering at a lab I'd been doing previously, which clashed with the economics class so I took biology and maths as my side subjects instead.

I hated it. I loved the university and some aspects of the course, but I realised I didn't want a career in this and that economics was the right path. I did a few weeks of sitting in on the class in second semester, then decided to redo first year and switch degrees, taking a leave of absence; my uni let me switch without reapplying which was a godsend. It was a terrifying decision, but I'm in my final year now and I can't imagine doing anything else!

I do still use my love for the sciences though- I've written an essay on genetic patents, had a project on environmental agreements, and tried to model a game of governments choosing organ donation laws etc

Honestly, it's such a hard decision to make but if you have a strong instinct towards one I'd maybe listen to your gut.

Whatever you choose, best of luck!
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TheBigT
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(Original post by JTR__)
I had a slightly similar situation:

I had been set on studying science (chemistry) for a few years, then the summer before applying I 'discovered' an interest in economics- it was the application of maths that drew me to both but I realised that economics was more appealing (won't go into details). I read lots, found a couple of online courses, and started linking some parts of my science interests to economics!

Spent a few months worrying over it, but was eventually convinced that chemistry was the safe/smart/responsible option so I applied and got in. When I went to uni I wanted to keep up some volunteering at a lab I'd been doing previously, which clashed with the economics class so I took biology and maths as my side subjects instead.

I hated it. I loved the university and some aspects of the course, but I realised I didn't want a career in this and that economics was the right path. I did a few weeks of sitting in on the class in second semester, then decided to redo first year and switch degrees, taking a leave of absence; my uni let me switch without reapplying which was a godsend. It was a terrifying decision, but I'm in my final year now and I can't imagine doing anything else!

I do still use my love for the sciences though- I've written an essay on genetic patents, had a project on environmental agreements, and tried to model a game of governments choosing organ donation laws etc

Honestly, it's such a hard decision to make but if you have a strong instinct towards one I'd maybe listen to your gut.

Whatever you choose, best of luck!
Wow! It's great to hear of such a similar situation. The decision surely is terrifying, haha. Glad everything worked out for you. Hearing your story gave me a boost of confidence, so thanks
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SJW-
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Yeah you should have just self studied your degree subject via books, YT, TV, podcasts etc all for little or no money.

In regards to management I have a related degree and in short we all want to get on those super impressive business graduate scheme. But the sad truth is this - very few of us actually will. There is just too many grads vs grad schemes or jobs. And again it goes back to self study part - all the stuff I learnt during my degree is freely available online or for little money. You don’t need to sit through a marketing class etc you can obtain the same info by fkn googling it
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TheBigT
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I appreciate that you can learn content from a degree online, but let's not pretend it doesn't open more doors actually having the degree. Besides from grad schemes there are a ton of jobs out there requiring at least degree level education.
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hallamstudents
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Hey TheBigT

I studied Computer Science after doing 2 years of it in College. I'd had enough of it by this point and decided, even though it was easy peasy for me, I wasn't interested in it. I decided the dramatic change to Media, something I enjoyed at GCSE but hadn't touched since.

I was able to get into contact with my lovely now course leader, who sat me down and asked why I wanted to join his course. He wasn't interested in grades, just that I had a knack for computers and wanted me to tell him why I'm passionate. He showed me the work he'd been doing while a university lecturer, how he's been studying, and he showed me a great amount of passion back. I was really enthralled, and haven't looked back since he welcomed me onto the course.

Hopefully you'll be able to do the same. It's not easy by any means, but it's definitely worth it when you find the right thing. Of course... there's the chance you'll fall into something you hate. But, that's the risk.

Wishing you the best over the holidays!
Josh
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