Should organ donors be asked if they are religious? Watch

Spirithorse
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People who join the NHS's UK organ donation register are to be asked if they want their religious beliefs to be considered in the donation process.

The question aims to reassure people that donation can take place in line with their faith or beliefs. It is hoped the measure can help to boost the low proportion of donors from black and Asian backgrounds. Research has found religious and cultural beliefs are the main barrier to organ donation in these communities.

Last year, 42% of black and Asian families agreed to donate their relative's organs, compared with 66% of families from the overall population. More than a third of patients waiting for a kidney transplant are from black, Asian and other minority ethnic communities and often their best chance of a match will come from someone of the same ethnic background.

A part of the shortage of donors is caused by people from these backgrounds choosing not to donate. But even if a person does choose to donate by signing up to the register, families have the final say on whether their organs should be used.

What do you think? Should people be asked about their religious beliefs when signing up for organ donation?
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Leviathan1611
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what do they're religious beliefs need to be considered for? I'm confused
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Spirithorse
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(Original post by Leviathan1611)
what do they're religious beliefs need to be considered for? I'm confused
There are many aspects that can be effected:

For example, in Islam there are two schools of thought with regard to organ donation. The human body, whether living or dead, enjoys a special honour and is inviolable, and fundamentally, Islamic law emphasises the preservation of human life. The general rule that ‘necessities permit the prohibited’ (al-darurat tubih al-mahzurat), has been used to support human organ donation with regard to saving or significantly enhancing a life of another provided that the benefit outweighs the personal cost that has to be borne.

According to a similarly large number of Muslim scholars, organ donation is not permitted. They consider that organ donation compromises the special honour accorded to man and this cannot be allowed whatever the cost. Scholars, such as the Islamic Fiqh Academy of India, allow live donations only.”

This is just one religious example. There are caveats linked to multiple religions including Jainism, Hinduism, Judaism and many more. The majority of which support the process of organ donation due to the positive impact it can have on another.
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Andrew97
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Just have it a as opt out,

Once I’m dead, I’m dead. I don’t care what happens to my organs. I won’t be needing them.
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tcameron
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My family are black Christians and have opted to be organ doners.
Most religious people don't see the physical body as the thing that is sacred/holy, but rather the soul so I don't think this statistic is really to do with soley being religous
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